Abigail Weil

Abigail Weil is a critic with The Theatre Times. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (11)
The Theatre Times

"Invites us into Swan’s salon for a scintillating evening of dance, poetry and visual art. It’s appropriately staged...Torn’s performance is touching and beautiful. In less capable hands, Swan’s fey movements and pompous pronouncements could come across as silly, even ridiculous...The show is a quiet sort of musical...Funny as hell, and queer as Fire Island in July...Yet it’s not a sheer camp extravaganza. The play deals seriously with aging, loss and loneliness.” Full Review

The Theatre Times

"How do I love 'Mrs. Murray’s Menagerie'? Let me count the ways. Extraordinary attention to detail, captivatingly committed performers, songs that are no less catchy for being incidental, and wicked bad hair on heads and faces...It amounts to the most fun I’ve had in the theater since the first Ars Nova production I ever saw: 'Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812.'" Full Review

Smoke & Mirrors
Chelsea
The Theatre Times

"Velour, who is gender fluid and uses feminine pronouns when dressed as a Queen, pushes us to realize that the distinction between male and female, like past and present, good and evil, singular and plural, is a construct, restrictive for daily living but productive for artistic creation...It’s not quite right to say that there’s just one person in the show. There are many performers and characters, but most of them are Velour herself." Full Review

The Theatre Times

"The play imagines a world in which figures from First Nations mythology coexist with contemporary ecological concerns and an urban landscape...Diversity is woven into every aspect of this show, from the range of musical styles to the variety of puppetry techniques...A talented puppeteer and singer, Henry is above all a storyteller, and this is her role both in the world of the play and on the stage...The show’s finale is a spectacular display of technical virtuosity." Full Review

Bonnie's Last Flight
East Village
The Theatre Times

"The play borrows a lot from pop culture, with some bits landing better than others...'Bonnie’s Last Flight' grapples with some weighty issues – regret, honesty, fidelity, aspiration, the degradation of air travel etiquette – and it packs a real emotional punch into the short time it takes to fly from New York to Chicago. By the time we were wheels down, I was in tears, and rooting for every last one of the Smelta crew. I also belly-laughed loud enough to disturb my seat-mate." Full Review

The Tricky Part
Midtown W
The Theatre Times

"Where Moran succeeds so brilliantly is in depicting the complexity of his relationship with Bob, a relationship that wasn’t without tenderness or even love...Moran is a subtle story-teller and his attention to detail nothing short of surgical...It’s his warm voice and soft, gentle eyes that make you feel like you’re sitting across a dinner table and he has just decided he can really trust you." Full Review

The Theatre Times

“’Norma Jeane Baker Of Troy’ is The Shed’s first commissioned work and all the parts are in place to make for a stunning theatrical experience. Like the entire Hudson Yards project, tremendous resources and top-notch talents have been poured into this project, and yet it somehow comes out as less than the sum of its parts. The Shed, maybe the one feature which could potentially redeem Hudson Yards, has room to grow. As a construct, it’s still a work-in-progress." Full Review

The Theatre Times

“It’s a story about stories...Perfect source material for a director like Herskovits...The entire cast was solid...The character work is extraordinary, including the seamless passing back and forth of different roles. You never feel like you’re struggling to remember who’s who because it really doesn’t matter. Thanks in part to the gorgeous set...and the inventive music performed live by Eamon Goodman, you’re well immersed in the world of the play." Full Review

Skinnamarink
East Village
The Theatre Times

"With great silliness, the show depicts the ridiculous potential of performative learning...The text is easy to laugh at from the vantage point of our cozy, atheistic, hyperlinked twenty-first century...There’s an earnestness in the language too, goofy as it is...Everything theater about childhood should be: nostalgic, embarrassing, unpredictable, and bizarre." Full Review

The Theatre Times

"It surges with authenticity. This is ironic because, of course, the authenticity is artificial. 'Fiddler' is no more a Yiddish show than 'Cabaret' is German; both are Great American Musicals...It’s funnier. Yiddish, as everyone knows, is man’s funniest language, both in the shapes of its sounds and its metaphoric flexibility...The use of Yiddish becomes truly meaningful...Speaking Yiddish is a labor of love, an act of resistance." Full Review

Awake
Midtown W
The Theatre Times

“There is nothing soft about the effects of this play. Its investigation into racial identity, gun violence, political ambition, and xenophobia is as sharp as a diamond...While the scenes don’t interweave, the themes certainly do...What the play gains...in breadth, it inevitably sacrifices in depth...Each of the dialogues come to feel like face-offs...Sometimes I yearned for more...But this is what you can do with small-form theater: tantalize, provoke, and move on to the next bit.” Full Review