Alan Scherstuhl

Alan Scherstuhl is a critic with Village Voice. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

If you are this critic, please see the instructions on how to add reviews, update your profile, or make changes to your excerpts and scores.

Reviews (8)
King Kong (NYC)
Midtown W
Slate.com

"The two-story, two-ton puppet star is a fearsome marvel...Generally speaking, when the ape’s onstage, flirting with his new friend Ann or battling a sickly snake, 'King Kong' rules. When he’s not, it’s a very occasionally inspired musical about a plucky star to be trying to make it in New York in the Depression. Director-choreographer Drew McOnie’s staging tends to clutter the production numbers." Full Review

Illyria
East Village
Village Voice

“As unshowy a play as you’re ever likely to see about show people...It’s revealing, when you tease significance from it...It’s also at times a little listless, quiet enough that if you’re not in the front rows you might have to lean in and strain to catch it all. It’s less like you’re watching a play than trying to make sense of your first day at an internship...The show is often muted...'Illyria’s' artists catch us up in their rich, reeling talk. But the scale and scope here is vigorously hu... Full Review

Village Voice

for a previous production "Every complaint you might have about the buffoonish wannabe autocrat and his administration gets belted to the rafters, often with wit and always with a familiar tune and principled razzle-dazzle. Such a show is by nature hit or miss...but if the current gag doesn’t hit you, the next one’s always incoming and quite likely on target...This is the first show I’ve ever adored that I hope has cause to close very soon." Full Review

In White America
Midtown W
Village Voice

"Most moving, in Charles Maryan's barebones but vital production, is the testimony of those who weren't orators...Rhinehart's performance is a wonder of pain and strength, but what hurts most is this nation's reluctance to heed the call of Barack Obama that bookends this fiery revival: 'For too long, we've been blind to the way past injustices continue to shape the present.' Be ready to rage-cry." Full Review

Whales
Gramercy
Village Voice

"A scruffy-punkish sixty-minute shadow-puppet sing-along unclassifiable, more a hard-boozing playdate or thought experiment than a narrative...Some of 'Whales' plays like boozy, swearing children’s theater for grown-ups. In playful and engaging crowd-interaction sequences, the cast enlists audience members to playact the life of whalers...The economics of whaling stir terrific feeling from a cast of musicians, puppeteers, and presenters." Full Review

Village Voice

“A mostly tepid entertainment best suited for people who enjoy nodding emphatically to the utterance of truths they knew walking in…Moore and director Mayer pad it out with crowd interactions...The one-person-can-change-things argument serves as justification for the show’s most assured and engaging passages: his recounting of highlights from his career as rabble-rouser. Always more a prankster than a polemicist, Moore can spin a tale, especially when the topic is his own escapades.” Full Review

Village Voice

“Dutifully clamorous and often joyously funny…Karl, a superb physical comedian, performs the role as if he's never seen Bill Murray in the 1993 original…The show gets darker and more idiosyncratic as it goes, the ensemble faring better in the moments that don't risk inducing a sugar-rush freeze headache…The production is consistently inventive in its craft…The team that has crafted it honors what worked in Harold Ramis's original film while picking at its retrograde aspects.” Full Review

Doctor Faustus
East Village
Village Voice

"'Doctor Faustus' is a hammy drag that feels far removed from the divine. Belgrader's approach emphasizes farce over feeling. Several times, the cast stops the show to engage audience members in strained comedy. None of this illustrates Marlowe's themes of human ambition or corruptibility...Hell is other people dragged onstage." Full Review