Alexandra Schwartz (critic)

Alexandra Schwartz is a critic with New Yorker. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

If you are this critic, please see the instructions on how to add reviews, update your profile, or make changes to your excerpts and scores.

Reviews (6)
New Yorker

"A Millennial Reboot of Chekhov, and 'Moulin Rouge!' on Broadway. Halley Feiffer translates 'Three Sisters' into Internet-speak, and Baz Luhrmann’s glitzy movie comes into its own onstage." Full Review

New Yorker

“Jacqueline Novak’s comedy is an overthinker’s delight, and a reminder that a woman’s humor can cut as deeply as her rage.” Full Review

New Yorker

"John Doyle’s sober revival of Bertolt Brecht’s 'The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui' couldn’t be more timely, though whether that timeliness enhances or diminishes its message I can’t quite decide...The production’s stripped-down realism has mixed results. It can pay to highlight Brecht’s stylish extremity. If Doyle vacillates between embracing and undercutting the play’s inherent cartoonishness, it is perhaps because our own daily reality has long since surpassed it." Full Review

New Yorker

"A Millennial Reboot of Chekhov, and 'Moulin Rouge!' on Broadway. Halley Feiffer translates 'Three Sisters' into Internet-speak, and Baz Luhrmann’s glitzy movie comes into its own onstage." Full Review

New Yorker

"Some of this self-parodying obtuseness is more cringey than cute. And yet the show, which knowingly leans deep into kitsch, is at once preposterous and delightful. Singing and dancing are probably not going to persuade anybody to 'love thy neighbor,' as one of the more infectious numbers advises. But, until someone has a better idea, it can’t hurt to try." Full Review

New Yorker

"Thus are the battle lines drawn: soulful artist vs. nitpicking pedant, in John’s view; amoral fabricator vs. ethical realist, in Jim’s...For such a conceit to work, we have to believe in the merit of the thing that is in dispute. Is one essay really worth all this fuss?...As the play goes on, and its initially sharp comedy dulls into a repetitive deadlock, it becomes clear that John is a martyr not to his notion of poetic truth but to the demands of his paper-thin writerly pride." Full Review