Alice Saville

Alice Saville is a critic with A Younger Theatre. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

If you are this critic, please see the instructions on how to add reviews, update your profile, or make changes to your excerpts and scores.

Reviews (62)
Time Out London

" ‘Chasing Hares’ tries to get the audience chanting along fall a little flat. But even if it doesn't fully rouse the masses, this is still a thoughtful and thoroughly welcome contribution to the conversation around workers' rights, as our politicians try their best to erode them." Full Review

The London Evening Standard

"There’s something jarring about watching an actor deliver a bravura performance surrounded by the bored faces of their fellow cast members: it’s a poignant reminder that even the most moving work of art will leave some people cold." Full Review

The London Evening Standard

"Understandably, this production softens the testosterone-marinated arrogance of spurned suitor Gaston … And Beast is less terrifying monster, more grumpy pussycat … All in all, it’s an extravagant, memorable update on a tale that’s as old as time, but as exhilarating as ever." Full Review

The Independent (UK)

Director Moritz von Stuelpnagel keeps things pacy, and secures fine, flamboyant performances from this A-grade cast. But still, this is all deeply old-fashioned stuff which ... could have easily been written any time in the last five decades. Full Review

Time Out London

Davies and Kelly have a winning chemistry... Still, it's not quite enough to make this paranoid pair entertaining company for this play's one-hour 45-minute running time. Full Review

The Independent (UK)

The Glass Menagerie is typically funny as well as tragic, but this production is light on laughter. That’s mostly down to Adams, who delivers a likeable but underpowered performance. This staging lacks the vigour to fully hit home. Full Review

Time Out London

Bartlett Sher’s production is slick and accomplished, but loses the narrative's subtlety in a crowd-pleasing burst of top-hatted kitsch. This production will just about satisfy its fans, without offering enough to win over sceptics. Full Review

Time Out London

The second act’s sickly lurch into tragedy comes as a shock ... the darkness doesn't quite land. It's a memorable start to the summer season, full of music and mayhem in equal measure. Full Review

Time Out London

This is a fine example of how to revive a dated play and make it feel postmodern and fresh. But the text of ‘The Corn is Green’ lacks the raw power needed to make this exercise feel worthwhile...Strong performances and an undeniable momentum make it fun to watch, but there's not much to ponder when the music fades. Full Review

Time Out London

Half-baked story aside, ‘Mary Poppins’ serves up everything you could want in a mega-budget family musical: memorable songs, dazzling visuals and a nostalgic ideal of a London that never existed. It’s supercalifragelistically good fun to visit for an hour or three. Full Review

The London Evening Standard

But as Covid restrictions force us all further apart, its rich atmosphere of longing feels powerfully current. It’s as soft and heartbreaking as an overheard sob in the night. Full Review

The London Evening Standard

...rather than emphasising [Measure for Measure's] bleak ironies, Blanche McIntyre’s oddly muted production strikes an uneasy balance between darkness and light. Full Review

The Independent (UK)

Parks’s play is undercut with a fatalism about a culturally required wokeness that only goes surface-deep ... It’s grim, brilliantly perceptive, and lets no one off the hook. Full Review

Time Out London

‘Come from Away’ creates a kind of temporary utopia: a little world where (almost) everyone is forced, by earth-shattering events hundreds of miles away, to come together and build a community based on principles of generosity and care. Full Review

Time Out London

Amélie’ is at its best when it’s slightly sending up its own po-faced premise...This production doesn’t fix ‘Amélie the Musical’, but mon dieu it makes it fun. Full Review

Time Out London

Jasmine Lee-Jones’s powerfully original debut play follows these two female friends having the most blistering, agonising, meme-scattered row of their lives. Nothing’s off-limits, from primary school humiliations to the vast structural privilege that light-skinned women have. Full Review

Poet in da Corner
Sloane Square
Time Out London

Buzzing with Dizzee Rascal tunes and daffy energy...Stevenson’s performance feels undeniable, soaked in the sweat of a ’00s east London that’s not quite Dizzee Rascal’s, but authentically hers.' Full Review

Time Out London

It’s a free adaptation that could afford to be freer, to dig into historical events without being tied to its Russian source – but when Ellams finds moments of synchronicity between continents, they’re painfully beautiful. Full Review

Time Out London

for a previous production A West End newcomer, 21-year-old Sam Tutty glows with sweat and goodness, bringing integrity to a storyline that’s somewhere between ingenious and tortuous. Full Review

On Bear Ridge
Sloane Square
Time Out London

Its cinematic staging creates a gloriously detailed shop-world that’s gradually dismantled...There’s nothing much new about this lament for lost rural identity, but it seeps into you...' Full Review

Falsettos
Victoria
Time Out London

This beautifully sung production is a reminder that ‘Falsettos’ deserves to be better known; its knotty, prophetic explorations of queer family shine out, even in a production that’s (metaphorically, not literally) a little off-key.' Full Review

Time Out London

for a previous production An intense, ambitious survey of women’s shifting roles, which amplifies each step in Ibsen’s elegantly crafted story, as though Nora’s stamping through a cathedral in Doc Martens.' Full Review

Time Out London

...lyrical passages aren’t matched by this production’s clumsy staging...The reviews from its debut suggest that this musical worked a kind of tentative charm on Broadway, but its sunny magic feels faint here.' Full Review

Man of La Mancha
West End
Time Out London

Producers Michael Linnit and Michael Grade don’t make a convincing case for reviving it: a mismatched celebrity cast and a by-numbers production mean that contemporary relevance, like chivalry, really is an impossible dream. Full Review

Time Out London

"It’s all totally, soul-feedingly wonderful...It feels so organic that you almost don’t notice how carefully it’s been crafted. Individual stories are woven through rousing, foot-stomping, all-company choruses. Actors swap between playing locals and incomers with a fluidity that shows it’s just chance separating the two...It’s seductive in its resolute unsexiness, and its gentle uncynical warmth spills off the stage, extending a hug to an audience that wouldn’t dream of turning it away." Full Review

Closer (London)
Hammersmith
Time Out London

"There's something refreshingly frank about the way that both genders speak about sex here. Marber’s play fizzes with one-liners that still shock, as well as twists that get genuine gasps from the audience. This beautifully-judged revival is a gauntlet thrown down to the next generation of playwrights: it's time for an exploration of sex for the twenty-first century." Full Review

The London Evening Standard

"This play contains fascinating, and unresolved questions about the role of a church in a community whose inhabitants only darken its doors for christenings, weddings, and funerals." Full Review

Time Out London

"‘The Fellowship’ is one of those stories that you emerge from feeling like you've gone on an epic journey with the people in it. It's full of moments that stretch out and become dreamlike, aided by designer Libby Watson's wonderfully surreal set with its long curving staircase. But it's also full of a political heft that punches through decades and speaks directly to the post-Brexit present day." Full Review

The London Evening Standard

Playwright Chris Bush’s story is full of thoughtful meditations. [The cast] play at least three roles apiece and make impressive work of it. Full Review

Britannicus (London)
Hammersmith
Time Out London

This production feels like a masterclass in how to take a seldom-staged ... text and seduce an audience into confronting it, in all its writhing, sexy ugliness. Full Review

The London Evening Standard

We Started To Sing feels like the work of a playwright wrestling to understand his place in the world and the family that formed him. It’s intriguing and exhausting at the same time. Full Review

Time Out London

‘The Ministry of Lesbian Affairs’ tackles massive themes, in ways that threaten to unbalance what's fundamentally a feel-good comedy. But it all just about works, thanks to a septet of winning performances and Hannah Hauer-King’s taut direction. It's a warm cosy hug of a show. Full Review

The Independent (UK)

In this revival ... all the old magic is intact and potent as ever. Perhaps it overly romanticises its drug-peddling hero, but with Rylance in the role, its spell is irresistible. Full Review

Scandaltown (London)
Hammersmith
Time Out New York

Rachel O’Riordan’s production gets some strong performances from the cast, but it never descends into the level of boisterous mayhem this kind of satire needs...it's hard not to wish he'd gone out all guns blazing, railing against times that badly need a satirist's pen. Full Review

The Independent (UK)

But a sense of real narrative progress needs to come from the story, not the scenery. Ultimately, it feels like a feeble, oddly bitter attempt to capture the lustre of a star who’s already fading from cultural memory. Full Review

The London Evening Standard

It’s a fascinating, slightly sombre panto that’ll delight kids with a taste for the macabre, even if it lacks the usual festive sweetness. Full Review

The London Evening Standard

Breen’s production is serious about being funny, which means each scene is carefully designed to squeeze every inch of laughter out of its audience. Full Review

A Place for We
Finsbury Park
The Independent (UK)

[Its] large cast of characters ... [disappointingly] doesn’t ... explore how [agencies] have colluded to transform the social character of neighbourhoods like Brixton. But it succeeds as an elegy for things lost. Full Review

Time Out London

The songs are sublime in Stephen Schwartz’s adaptation of his Biblical cartoon, but the rest is a muddle. Full Review

My Night with Reg
Battersea
The London Evening Standard

Kevin Elyot’s gay classic is timely and deserves to reach a new generation - but it needs a fresher production than this. This play deserves to reach new generations, but it’ll need more than a few houseplants to make it feel fresh. Full Review

Be More Chill
Victoria
Time Out London

for a previous production "Be More Chill’ is not an innovative addition to the crowded canon of male coming-of-age stories. But its saving grace is its willingness to have fun.' Full Review

Time Out London

...a fresh but sometimes overburdened new take...a free adaptation that could afford to be freer...but when Ellams finds moments of synchronicity between continents, they’re painfully beautiful.' Full Review

Time Out London

But somehow, it feels underpowered here: the 22-strong cast isn’t numerous enough to make the dance routines feel lavish...What this plucky production does deliver is charm. Full Review

Time Out London

Wendell Pierce and Sharon D Clarke remaining on board; they’re on incredible form as a married couple whose wistful reveries rarely deliver their promise. Full Review

Vassa
Camden Town
Time Out London

Bartlett’s adaptation is very, very funny, and its nihilist jokes are underscored by Craig’s uproarious staging. Full Review

Time Out London

This gloriously weird and subversive musical will please adults and kids alike...kids...lap up this offbeat blend of bad-old-days violence, giant dancing doughnuts, and knowing, but expansive, joy.' Full Review

Present Laughter
Southwark
Time Out London

Andrew Scott is wondrous in this revelatory update... Coward’s comedy lets Scott show off both his endless proficiency for delivering a well-timed quip, and his physical virtuosity.' Full Review

Time Out London

Shaking your fist at this play’s ridiculousness is...pointless...The only thing for it is to enjoy some of its most memorable moments...a comedy that’s lost some of its jokes but none of its central poignancy.' Full Review

Going Through
Shepherds Bush
Time Out London

A delicate and moving coming-of-age narrative of child migrant experience...It’s a production that shows the richness of communicating using sign language...' Full Review

Time Out London

“Parton's somewhat hallucinatory musical is a wilfully preposterous crowd-pleaser...Although this show started out...in 2005, it feels pretty post-Weinstein, with its uncompromising focus on male shitness and violent retribution...The plot is about as ridiculous as these women’s ultra-glam interpretation of ‘office wear’...Fortunately, no one even pretends to take it seriously...‘9 to 5’ is this show’s best song, and it knows how to use it, ie as often as possible." Full Review