Allison Adato

Allison Adato is a critic with Entertainment Weekly. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

If you are this critic, please see the instructions on how to add reviews, update your profile, or make changes to your excerpts and scores.

Reviews (24)
Entertainment Weekly

Grade: B, "Bob Dylan's songs come to the stage in Conor McPherson's 'Girl From the North Country'" Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

Grade: A-. "Laura Linney makes memory mesmerizing in 'My Name is Lucy Barton'" Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

“A near-perfect production of Shakespeare’s finest rom-com...While the production references our dispiriting current political climate, the mood is generally joyous, the laughs plentiful, and the focus rightly on Shakespeare’s battle of the sexes...For the most part the...text and updated milieu mesh nicely...At other moments, the plot bangs up against the setting...This ‘Ado’ offers too much joy to worry about vexing questions. For the most part, it makes a virtue of its contemporary touches.” Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"With Tracy-Flick pluck, she dives into an energetic civics lesson. And soon, she springboards from the Ninth and 14th Amendments to talk about the women in her family, and about herself in the most personal terms...It’s no small achievement to eke laughs out of that material, but Schreck certainly does, her humor swinging from self-deprecating to the can-you-believe-these-guys variety...It is shaggily structured, but also original, which is to be celebrated." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"A thoughtful, tension-filled 90 minutes. It is a play about race, yes, and about the assumptions we make about people. It is also a play about misunderstandings, inadvertent and willful, inconsequential and potentially fatal...Kenny Leon paces this taut production more like a thriller than a polemic...'American Son' is most affecting when it is personal, not political...There is, contained within 'American Son’s' lean script, much to discuss after the curtain falls." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"It’s kind of a medical miracle, what Mike Birbiglia has done. No, not fathering a child after fertility doctors informed him 'my boys don’t swim.' Rather, he has miraculously breathed life into a catalogue of ancient comedy targets...His take on these subjects is frequently hilarious, and fresh nearly to the point of innocence, as Birbiglia encounters each awful reality for himself...An affecting story is at first funny, then sad, and finally profound." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"Director Ruben Santiago-Hudson’s confidently unfussy staging, and many of the performances by a cast that includes several Public Theater regulars, are a thrill to witness...As villianous Iago, Stoll brings a comic’s timing and puts over even very well known lines as if he is speaking extemporaneously. It is not only a delight to watch, it is a boon to anyone who avoids Shakespeare for fear of missing the meaning...This is a traditional take on the Moor, with all the trimmings." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"Far from an easy evening of theater, despite being a swift, intermission-less hour-and-a-half...Many of the hallmarks of great Albee — pitch black humor, verbal takedowns, delightfully indulgent cynicism — are initially in short supply here...It is an imperfect play, but there are two excellent reasons to see 'Three Tall Women': Jackson and Metcalf." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"Ensler is smart, funny, mostly fearless, empathetic - an engaging if sometimes tangent-plagued raconteur...Parts of 'In the Body of the World' are hard to hear...With a piece this intimately personal and politically significant, it feels churlish to take Ensler to task for stylistic shortcomings. Yes, the show is a mishmash of worthy concerns. But Paulus is comfortable with chaos, and helpfully reigns in the tangents, presenting each segment in a well-defined space." Full Review

M. Butterfly
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

"Success here hinges on pinning the right Butterfly...Julie Taymor’s take meets that challenge with the casting of newcomer Jin Ha in a fearless, confrontational, and often seductive turn as the diva...Spared the pressure of keeping a spoiler under wraps, this revised 'Butterfly' has room to expand its political parable, and more deeply explore Song’s backstory." Full Review

Marvin's Room
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

"Unfortunately, this first Broadway production of 'Marvin’s Room' never quite justifies its trip back to the early ’90s. While not a conspicuous period piece, it resists updating, and yet lacks the emotional power and resonance to move us from its long-ago vantage...While director Anne Kauffman’s take on 'Marvin’s Room' is frequently funny, it is merely serious when you wish it would be moving." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"A feel-good musical about 9/11?...Save for one woman who cannot get in touch with her NYC firefighter son, our travelers are, at worst, disoriented and inconvenienced...The music is confident and lively, and the lyrics keep the story moving...The double-and-more casting underscores 'Come From Away’s' people-are-people theme. The point is struck somewhat heavily at times. But when the show threatens to feel pat, it helps to remember this all happened." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

Grade: B. "Ruth Negga crowns herself a brooding prince in Hamlet." Full Review

Betrayal
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

B+ "Tom Hiddleston, Charlie Cox, and Zawe Ashton command a smart, stripped down 'Betrayal'" Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"She offers her own take on male frailty and hubris, her voice booming, her focus astonishing. If her gender enters into her portrayal at all, it is only fleetingly toward the end; it may be in the eye of this beholder, but a woman grieving a child registers differently from man facing the same catastrophe...Worth mention in an overall solid cast is Broadway regular John Douglas Thomas as the Earl of Kent...It is this returning veteran in the title role that makes this Lear memorable." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"This show too can boast of incredible simulation. Credit for that goes largely to its star, Stephanie J. Block, a charismatic stage presence in her own right who is here a careful mimic...No discussion of thin plotting, of costumes changes subbing for character development, or of retro har-har jokes will dissuade true believers looking for a bedazzled good time. Except perhaps this: Why not go see Real Cher who, at 72, looks and sounds at least as much like her younger self as Block does?" Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"The challenge of collaborating with this monumental body of work trips up the much-acclaimed McPherson. His words — blustery, profane, biting — never find a way to mesh with the evocative, easy poetry of the troubadour himself...The cast and on-stage band put over the songs well in their new arrangements. But even as you’re tapping your toes, you may well be shaking your head: Why this upbeat rendition of 'The Hurricane' just after tragedy hits?" Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

“A 90-minute sprint that tosses out a lot of 17th-century verse in favor of contemporary lyrics. At times that does give the impression of two shows sewn, artfully if not seamlessly, together...Even the sometime use of sign, plus a brass band that trails Olivia, a smattering of sword play, and just the sheer size of the cast gives this 'Twelfth Night' a gleeful all-in feel. It rarely hits hilarious highs but delights with a steady insistence and overwhelms with a tidal wave of enthusiasm." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"'The Iceman Cometh' is in good hands with this latest creative team led by director George C. Wolfe...Yes, the play is long and the dialogue often repetitive...And yet it can be repetitive in the way music is, coming back to themes that the cast riffs on neatly under Wolfe’s orchestration...Washington’s Hickey proves a transfixing storyteller, a salesman who knows how to close." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"As relevant as ever, in part because it wrestles with timeless questions of good and evil, faith and loyalty, and what connects us to one another. In fact, in its near-total realization of some of modern theater’s greatest ambitions, it still towers over almost any stage event in its wake...Elliott...brings out the text’s dreamier aspects, blurring an unreal reality...This renewed reminder that the world will spin forward also through these troubled times feels especially welcome." Full Review

Meteor Shower
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

“A very funny play. Keening-like-a-howler-monkey funny. Design-a-new-cry-laughing-emoji funny. What it is not, however, is a substantial play...The night belongs to Schumer, her timing, her mugging, her deftness with some extremely ridiculous gags...Her delivery makes the play feel of this moment...Even as it hurdles towards its abrupt, if sentimental, ending, ‘Meteor Shower’ burns brightly with laughs.” Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"This forgotten gem of a play pushes the boundaries of its well-heeled drawing room setting into a metaphysical dream world...As deftly handled by director Rebecca Taichman, Priestley’s metaphysics are poignant where, in less able hands, they could come off as annoyingly mystical. And while its 'Downton' connection might fill seats, 'The Conways', despite some superficial period similarities, reveals its own complex pleasures — just give it time." Full Review

The End of Longing
West Village
Entertainment Weekly

"There are a few chuckles here, and some comfortingly familiar sarcasm...But for the most part 'Longing' consists of four characters announcing feelings that these actors are likely skilled enough to register without many words...Where Perry’s script and performance does graze the truth is in two monologues that his character delivers about the grip and desperation of addiction...I found myself wondering if 'Longing' might have better succeeded as a one-man show." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"One need not know Seurat to enjoy this enchanting production. Jake Gyllenhaal, bearded and intense with a rich singing voice, makes the character understood immediately...This production is smartly directed by Sarna Lapine, with an economical staging based on her 2016 concert version...This stripped down 'Sunday' doesn’t lack for its own theatrical delight and instead lets the characters’ yearnings fill the frame." Full Review