Andrzej Lukowski

Andrzej Lukowski is a critic with Time Out London. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (134)
Time Out London

An absolute hoot, a joyous, big-hearted, ludicrously incident-packed and magic-heavy romp that has to stand as one of the most unrelentingly entertaining things to hit the West End. Full Review

Time Out London

‘Pretty Woman: The Musical’ is a good times and low expectations sort of show that does the minimum expected of it, and no more... cynical, soulless, nostalgia cash-in. Full Review

Time Out London

Midway between a panto, a musical and a morality lecture ... [it] is a kinder, gentler alternative to a full-on panto. Writer-director Sarah Punshon’s production is a bit shoestring but very endearing, with an extremely hardworking cast. Full Review

Time Out London

‘PRIME_TIME’ is absolutely not a slick, self-righteous takedown of Amazon. But ... almost everybody in the Western world is on some level infuriated with Jeff Bezos, and in a sense all In Bed with My Brother are doing is pushing this into the realm of art via entertaining absurdity and stomach-churning bile. Full Review

Time Out London

‘Get Up, Stand Up!’ has wonderful tunes, a phenomenal star turn, and a weak story. For now, the first two points largely cancel out the third. But there is an awful lot resting on Arinzé Kene’s prodigious shoulders, and he’s not going to stay with the show forever. Full Review

Time Out London

I don’t think anybody could realistically see this imperfect, absurd, magnificent show and suggest that its crown as London’s longest-runner is in any danger. Full Review

The Great Gatsby
Westminster
Time Out London

London’s longest-running immersive theatre show is a fun night out, but not a lot more than that...really, it’s no more articulate an adaptation than that gif of Leonardo DiCaprio toasting the camera.' Full Review

Frozen (London)
Covent Garden
Time Out London

This isn’t ‘Frozen’ for adults, a dark new take on ‘Frozen’, or a radical reinvention by spectacle like ‘The Lion King’. But it’s a thoughtful, attractive and human spin that manages to balance a Drury Lane-size spectacle. If the film is a pre-school classic, the musical is maybe a couple of years more grown-up. Full Review

Time Out London

It’s a fascinating play ... for me the biggest problem was that its fitful brilliance fails to yield a final killer point. Still it’s a brave, hilarious and singular play – perhaps it’s not the masterpiece it threatens to be, but it’s still something pretty special. Full Review

Anna X
Westminster
Time Out London

Daniel Raggett directs the hell out of this thing. Legal restrictions are almost certainly the ... reason for ‘Anna X’ not being a ‘proper’ Anna Delvey play. It‘s come on ... since it premiered ... but ... it’s not quite the thing that it wants to be. Full Review

Leopoldstadt
Covent Garden
Time Out London

Ultimately, ‘Leopoldstadt’ is a powerful and sincere tribute to a vanished people. Hopefully they can live on for a little longer thanks to the last great play of the last great writer of the twentieth century. Full Review

Anna X
Westminster
Time Out London

‘Anna X’ is a weird play. It’s very good on the idea of society as an arbitrary, transactional construct...But there’s a surprising lack of grit here. Full Review

Time Out London

But it’s a zingy, entertaining play. Atim and Jeremiah nail it. Wanamaker and Capaldi don’t quite. There will be some universes where it’s the opposite. But it’s hard to imagine there are any in which ‘Constellations’ doesn’t add a little magic to our summer. Full Review

Under Milk Wood
Waterloo
Time Out London

Michael Sheen is terrific in Dylan Thomas’s linguistic tour de force, which remains undimmed by the years. Full Review

Time Out London

All Julia Donaldson adaptations are ultimately an exercise in making a book that takes five minutes to read last 45 or so minutes on stage. But the way ‘The Smartest Giant…’ goes about it really is lovely... Full Review

Time Out London

[The Sun, The Moon and The Stars is] a solid debut play from Baruwa-Etti, and a springboard for a truly epic performance from Tanji. Full Review

Harm
Shepherds Bush
Time Out London

Eclair-Powell’s script is sharp, but my biggest problem with ‘Harm’ is that its protagonist’s mix of relatable depression and Jagger-ish pizzazz only goes so far in dressing up the fact she becomes a stalker, something Eclair-Powell’s text and Atri Banerjee’s production feels strangely forgiving of. Full Review

Magic Goes Wrong
Westminster
Time Out London

If you enjoy watching flustered English people get more flustered as stuff goes wrong – and let’s be clear, that is literally their entire shtick – then ‘Magic Goes Wrong’ sees them pulls the trick off once again. Full Review

A Number
Southwark
Time Out London

Polly Findlay brilliantly reimagines Caryl Churchill’s cloning play as a kitchen sink drama, powered by a phenomenal performance from Roger Allam... it’s devastating because it feels so familiar.' Full Review

The Welkin
Lambeth
Time Out London

The play is relentlessly interesting, but for me it’s the dependence on melodramatic reveals to advance the plot that ultimately sinks ‘The Welkin’ a bit...there’s a magnificence in its muddle.' Full Review

Time Out London

Natalie Abrahami’s production is a searing 90 minutes that deals with history you’ll probably know, from angles you might not...it’s hard not to be impressed by Elizabeth’s cold-eyed triumph.' Full Review

Cyrano de Bergerac
Westminster
Time Out London

It doesn’t have the euphoric effortlessness and virtuoso authenticity of ‘Hamilton’; but it’s not a million miles off...Lloyd and co have cooked up something pretty remarkable. Full Review

The Boy Friend
Southwark
Time Out London

Not so much a musical as a lobotomy with songs, Sandy Wilson’s 1953 opus ‘The Boy Friend’ is an exercise in frothy escapism so extreme it’s basically trolling us.' Full Review

Time Out London

Ecstatic, shamanic and psychedelic take on the beloved fantasy novel from the great Sally Cookson...a wilderness of pure imagination, unshackled, ecstatic and pagan.' Full Review

Henry VI
Bankside
Time Out London

Here, ‘Henry VI’ (a three-and-a-quarter-hour edit of original parts two and three) is rendered atmospherically and interestingly...' Full Review

Time Out London

Is a feelgood jukebox musical the absolute best medium to tell a story about domestic abuse? Put crudely, that is the problem at the heart of big-budget global premiere...Don’t get me wrong: it’s an entertaining night, brilliantly performed. Full Review

Manor
Waterloo
Time Out London

‘Manor’ is a misfiring state-of-the-nation satire that doesn’t work, but is enjoyably messy nonetheless. As [it] heads for the interval, it’s actually quite intriguing ... [but] the second half is basically nonsense. Full Review

Little Scratch
Camden Town
Time Out London

[The actors] throw themselves into the role emotionally, but don’t do a lot of body acting ... It would work almost as well on radio ... 'Little Scratch’ is a virtuoso articulation of a remarkable piece of writing. Full Review

'Night, Mother
South Hampstead
Time Out London

I just wish I could be more enthusiastic about the show. It’s admirable that Channing traversed the Atlantic to star in a play that’s hardly awards-bait. It’s an almighty subject. But the treatment here is numbing, verging on dull. Full Review

Anything Goes
Barbican
Time Out London

Imported Broadway star Sutton Foster effortlessly steals every scene as Reno with a devastating mix of raw talent ... and sheer, gutbusting effort. They don’t make ’em like this anymore ... but it feels fresh. Full Review

Is God Is (Royal Court )
Sloane Square
Time Out London

'Is God Is’ is weighted with symbolism and potential meanings ... still, for all the thrill of the trip, its mix of nihilism and glibness left me a bit cold, emotionally speaking. [It] might have felt more meaningful if it had taken its time just a little more. Full Review

Time Out London

‘Rockets and Blue Lights’ is illuminated by dazzling flashes of brilliance. But ... I could never quite grasp the full shape of what Pinnock and Crowell were creating. Full Review

Time Out London

Look, it’s a kids’ show with some winning songs and the budget of a small nation state. Of course it’s fun. But there’s no great revelation in this revival – it’s just a 50-year-old musical coasting on bright tunes and arched eyebrows. Full Review

2:22 A Ghost Story
Covent Garden
Time Out London

Dunster directs ... with a macabre playfulness that comes to the fore in Ian Dickinson’s magnificently unsettling sound design. There’s no denying that Allen is the one who’ll put bums on seats. But ‘2:22’ is a rare ... example of a Good West End Ghost Play. Full Review

& Juliet
Westminster
Time Out London

The plot is fun provided you refuse to take any of what happens seriously. It’s basically ‘Romeo & Juliet’ rewritten into a sort of woke panto. Full Review

Lava
Shepherds Bush
Time Out London

Anthony Simpson-Pike’s kinetic production often feels more like a freeform poetic eruption than a sculpted piece of drama. But Adékoluejo is such a titanic presence she sort of irons out the kinks by charisma alone. Full Review

Time Out London

And there are lots of fine performances: Rebekah Murrell...is a compelling ball of energy as Juliet...It’s a bit broken. Traditionalists will recoil. But it’s thrillingly imperfect. Full Review

Bach & Sons
London Bridge
Time Out London

But ‘Bach & Sons’ is entertaining stuff, made with care, and if the drama is on the cosy side, it’s worth saying the music always thrills, melodic razors of harpsichord, slashing thrilling patterns through the air. Full Review

and breathe...
Islington
Time Out London

‘and breathe…’ is a beautiful balance of words, sound and feeling, delicate and indestructible as a shaft of light. Full Review

After Life
Waterloo
Time Out London

Jack Thorne’s stunning version of Hirokazu Kore-eda’s magical realist drama is the best show to run in London since the pandemic. Full Review

Time Out London

But in 2021, [Midsummer Night's Dreams'] cheery maximalism is a blessed relief from the endless diet of minimalism, misery and compromise we’ve been subject to over the last year. Full Review

Lungs
Lambeth
Time Out London

Claire Foy and Matt Smith are magnetic in this big stage outing for Duncan Macmillan’s climate change drama...‘Lungs’ isn’t a flat-out masterpiece: but it is a good play about climate change...' Full Review

Time Out London

Jacobean tragedy meets ‘Dynasty’ in this agreeably fabulous take on Thomas Middleton's gorefest...This is an audacious take on ‘Women Beware Women’, but it loses its nerve at the end...' Full Review

Time Out London

Kushner’s language is wonderful. You won’t be bored. But his Kushner-isms ultimately get in the way of this play being as good as it could be...singular but rambling take on a European classic.' Full Review

Endgame
Lambeth
Time Out London

‘Endgame’...can be far more ominous and chilly; here it almost has the air of a surrealist sitcom...Daniel Radcliffe shows off his gifts for physical comedy in this uncharacteristically fun night of Beckett.' Full Review

Time Out London

It’s a great way to divert your own little piggies for 90 minutes. But it’s a little on the lowest-common-denominator side: sincerely, there is a better ‘Peppa’ stage show waiting to be made. Full Review

Fairview
Lambeth
Time Out London

‘Fairview’ unfolds as a sometimes hysterically funny, sometimes deeply uncomfortable, sometimes desperately impassioned and earnest plea for white American culture to leave black American culture alone.' Full Review

Time Out London

...gloriously widescreen, five-hour, two-part adaptation ...ultimately it’s about two towering performances, one delicate and nuanced, one dense and dark as a neutron star.' Full Review

Richard III
Bankside
Time Out London

Sophie Russell’s psychotic Richard takes centre-stage for the second play in the Globe Ensemble’s thrilling new rep season.' Full Review

Touching The Void
Charing Cross
Time Out London

What elevates ‘Touching the Void’ from ‘well-judged’ to ‘spine-tingling’ is Morris’s exemplary staging, in cahoots with a crack creative team headed by designer Ti Green and movement director Sasha Milavic Davies. Full Review