Anya Ryan

Anya Ryan is a critic with The Independent (UK). This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (26)
The Stage (UK)

"It’s a pity, as with the right focus, this could have been a genuinely amusing show. But in its current state, it requires further evolution." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

"There is no weak link in this cast of six, who work as well as an ensemble as they do individually. But while this is a good first outing for this new musical, it could do with digging deeper than its prettily decorated interior." Full Review

Jitney (London)
Southwark
Time Out London

This is a talent-packed cast that would do [Wilson] proud. Wondrous and captivating, Craig’s production gets this play’s soul. Full Review

Time Out London

[Eileen Walsh and David Walmsley] are tectonic performers with arresting chemistry. Despite its imperfections, it is this disturbing vision that will stay with you long past the bloody finale. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Grease’s hopeless devotees will not be disappointed. The central girl-meets-boy high-school love story remains intact. But the truly affecting moments come with Foster’s considered directorial choices. Though the humour in this production ... could be cranked up a notch or two, this is a good night out. Full Review

Scandaltown (London)
Hammersmith
The Independent (UK)

But beyond packing as many contemporary cultural references into his script as possible, Bartlett’s satire about the rich and powerful is underachieving...Though we might be having a Mike Bartlett moment, this is a clutter of a parody that, unlike some of his other triumphs, leaves a sour taste. Full Review

The 47th (London)
Southwark
The Independent (UK)

Writer Mike Bartlett has crafted an epic. Like his 2014 play King Charles III, The 47th is an imagination of a future world. The year is 2024, and Trump is having another bash at the presidency. But, while the play’s events feel eerie in their potential realism, Bartlett’s form is, crucially, theatrical. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

The strong moments come when the women talk frankly. In their occasional mirroring monologues, they reflect on their individual struggles...Walker’s point is hammered hard. For women – even “bloody difficult” ones – the fight for success is an uphill climb. Full Review

SPLINTERED
Soho
The Guardian (UK)

An expert in merging history lessons with humour, Aboud has created an audience-embracing celebration of the origins of Caribbean carnival...the defiantly flamboyant spirit of the festival is deeply woven into every directorial decision. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Under Alice Fitzgerald’s vibrant direction, Hanly bounces around an initially clean, green stage designed by Jacob Lucy. While the play has big ideas, too many are left hanging. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Filled with timely, if sometimes too on-the-nose, jokes about Brexit and the failed NHS Covid app, [Vikki Stone's] script celebrates Hammersmith in all its glory. Full Review

The Independent (UK)

[Neil Gaiman's] story is brought to life in Joel Horwood’s thunderous adaptation, which finds wonder even in the most unremarkable of moments. Full Review

A Place for We
Finsbury Park
The Guardian (UK)

Full of subtlety and naturalism, Maddocks’ script ... is a gift to its actors. 'A Place for We' is a moving portrait of the ever-evolving face of London. Full Review

Time Out London

"The power of this production’s focus on Dwight is realised with an extraordinary performance from Lee Phillips. Excelling in his character, he balances his unease with a genuine love for his family. Heart-wrenching and essential, this is not perfect theatre, but it packs a punch." Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

"There are sophisticated flashes of confrontation between the sisters but, stretched longer than two and a half hours, the script is slow and bloated. Jokes are repeated – one about Amazon’s Alexa initially brings laughter but eventually fatigues. It takes a while before each scene moves from being a shouting match and settles to drive this big-life tale along." Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Though, at times the volume of the melodies drown out the action, this is a play that fights for the rousing power of music. [It's a must] see for music heads and non-music heads alike. Full Review

LIFT (London)
Elephant and Castle
The Stage (UK)

The plot of this 90-minute musical is almost entirely non-existent. Songs are shoved into sequences in a way that is impossible to follow. The actors shift identity in a manner that lacks clarity. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

The results are more comic than epic. Deaths are almost laughable in their lethargy. There are a few good performances ... [but] this production is something of a wasted opportunity... [it] is a limp interpretation that lacks any true sense of identity or purpose. Full Review

Wolf Cub (London)
Hampstead
The Stage (UK)

Ché Walker’s play is a coming-of-age story in Reagan’s America. But, with years of ground to cover, the result is a thinly drawn history...Despite this, Wolf Cub drags as a play. It never roars. Full Review

Anyone Can Whistle (London)
Elephant and Castle
The Stage (UK)

Sondheim described his show as a “cartoon”, which seems a fitting description for Rankcom’s fantastically silly retelling...In a production that celebrates all that are considered ‘other’ in society, it is fitting that the abundantly talented, diverse cast carry this largely muddled story. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Still, this is a story that deserves attention. Gay conversion practices continue to be legal in the UK. Although the musical is rooted firmly in comedy, it shines a light on the horrors of such unethical treatments. Full Review

Never Not Once
Finsbury Park
The Guardian (UK)

Crim’s gut-wrenching play is a visceral interrogation of the lasting effects and consequences of rape. Weighty and forceful, it asks how life can continue after panoramic trauma. Full Review

Folk (London)
Hampstead
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production Described as a play with songs, the text is littered with folk music favourites and bursts off the stage with an autumnal accompaniment of fresh morning breeze and birdsong designed by Tingying Dong. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Though at times too gentle in its approach, Straight White Men is a timely identity study that gives a powerful critique of 21st-century white male psychology. Full Review

Rice
Richmond
The Stage (UK)

It’s a play that feels both ambitious and necessary. But while the production is often striking in its beauty, it could benefit from a clearer, more focused understanding of what it is trying to say. Full Review

The Independent (UK)

The best moments come when Saunders is centre-stage, [though] the rest of the cast do ... hold their own. Rose Wardlaw’s portrayal of the anxious housemaid Edith ... is one of the few properly laugh-out-loud moments. Full Review