Ava Wong Davies

Ava Wong Davies is a critic with London Theatre. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (21)
The Woods
Elephant and Castle
The Stage (UK)

David Mamet’s little-performed 1977 duologue, The Woods, returns to London 21 years after it first premiered, in Russell Bolam’s confident production that never manages to escape the fundamental limitations of its text. Full Review

Running with Lions
Hammersmith
London Theatre

Oddly enough, the classic family drama has become increasingly hard to come by in post-pandemic London theatre. Sian Carter’s debut play, developed and co-produced by Talawa Theatre, steps into that gap in the market with relish. Full Review

The Independent (UK)

Moulin Rouge! is determinedly set on entertaining its audience; and if that intention can lend itself to a blandness in its slower moments, and a smoothness around some of its edges, then there’s almost always a diamond of a number around the corner. Full Review

Frozen (London)
West End
The Independent (UK)

The script ... is serviceable, if not overly adventurous – it ... does little to deepen the characters. The same goes for the new music ... for the most part, it’s filler. Stephanie McKeon’s Anna is delightfully gutsy ... and Samantha Barks as Elsa is both ethereal and commanding. Full Review

J'Ouvert
West End
The Independent (UK)

Yasmin Joseph’s debut play, a beautifully rendered love letter to Notting Hill Carnival, is a kinetic, strikingly confident piece of work that also happens to be the most “live” that live theatre has felt since its return. Full Review

London Theatre

At its highs, Amélie is very high indeed. It is a shame that there is a frankly unforgivable level of racial homogeneity in the cast...and Lucas has seemingly sidestepped the opportunity to update some of the more questionable aspects of this 20 year old film. Full Review

Six (West End)
West End
The Independent (UK)

for a previous production As dazzling as the iconic show may be, it fails to fulfil its aim of portraying Henry VIII’s wives as individual women with beating hearts. Full Review

London Theatre

...a self-consciously low-key production — really, more of a poetry reading than a piece of theatre... It’s testament to Ellams’s extraordinary talent that this autobiographical show is as engrossing as it is.' Full Review

WhatsOnStage

Elizabeth Freestone's direction, though fleet-footed and fluid, often sags where it should feel taut. It is an admirable piece of work, one delivered with full-blooded conviction...' Full Review

A Kind of People
Sloane Square
The Stage (UK)

...for a piece that does so much to unpack stereotypes, the supporting characters... feel undercooked... It’s a shame as the play really crackles in places.' Full Review

White Pearl
Sloane Square
The Stage (UK)

Ugliness runs through Anchuli Felicia King’s play. White Pearl is a scathing, gleefully nasty corporate satire set in the Singapore headquarters of an Asian skin-lightening cosmetics company.' Full Review

Our Generation
Waterloo
The Independent (UK)

Our Generation is an experiment that, though steered by some phenomenally assured performances, collapses under its own weight. Full Review

The Independent (UK)

Rice does a fairly remarkable job in making the text as lucid as it is, even if depth of character is sacrificed for breadth of narrative. In the end, it is the tireless ensemble who anchor the show. Full Review

Manor
Waterloo
The Independent (UK)

'Manor' ends up saying very little, except for a generic appeal to love one another and to see that “in our differences, we are the same”, a trite conclusion to come to after almost three hours. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

The play is a sprawling piece of work, and the pacing is oddly modulated, with a first half that takes its time setting up its chess pieces, and a second that lands only some of its gut-punches. Much of the play feels overly mannered. Full Review

After Life
Waterloo
The Stage (UK)

There are many (quite literally) moving parts in After Life, but by some miracle each part feels tempered and bolstered by the other parts around it, rather than a series of more disparate elements tied together. Full Review

Walden
West End
The Independent (UK)

Walden is a big, ambitious play that ends up collapsing somewhat under the weight of its own ideas. Full Review

Quarter Life Crisis
London Bridge
London Theatre

...a lovingly crafted, warmly entertaining piece of work — Mercy is a delightful presence, and a joy to spend an evening with...Stories about friends and family... feel less immediately gripping.' Full Review

Beat The Devil
London Bridge
The Independent (UK)

Though there is something cathartic about watching someone articulate a righteous anger... Beat the Devil comes across as somewhat slapdash, with a lumbering heavy-handedness that feels more akin to a first draft...' Full Review

Scenes With Girls
Sloane Square
The Stage (UK)

Miriam Battye’s London Royal Court debut is a springy, if wobbly, exploration of contemporary womanhood...Battye’s text is a soup of half-thoughts and scalpel-sharp observations...But the play never fully coalesces.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It does feel like some of the storytelling moments haven’t fully coalesced into the production as a whole...But at its best, A History of Water has an intoxicating, headily persuasive energy to it.' Full Review