Beate Hein Bennett

Beate Hein Bennett is a critic with New York Theatre Wire. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (17)
80
New York Theatre Wire

"Brief but entertaining production...The black-box space downstairs at TNC has the perfect atmosphere for CMT's old time puppet theater...We all had a 'happy good night'—and the moral of the tale? Let each one ruminate on how the devil will get his due (or not)." Full Review

85
New York Theatre Wire

"The 70 minute performance takes us on a wild romp through the underbelly of Soviet-Russian life with all its horror and absurdities—the laughter gets stuck in our craw...Varda created a compact script that contains the rich dark tapestry of Soviet life as Erofeev wove it from the tatters of all-too human existence...all mixed with a keen sense of absurd humor and irony...The verbal and physical dexterity of the three actors...brings the dense text to life." Full Review

80
New York Theatre Wire

"Friedman touches the raw nerve of race relations in American history which has not been fully resolved yet...The production is very handsome...Woods Jr. directed this production with obvious care for detail. He maintains pace and rhythm of the scenes and uses space quite ingeniously...Solid cast...Each maintains distinct a characterization and together they create a microcosm of the vast American social landscape during and post-Civil War that resonates still today." Full Review

70
New York Theatre Wire

"Kowalchuk presents 'her' Anne as an independent full-bodied sensual woman...While the ear at times is jarred with some anachronisms, her performance slides over these with her delightful sense of ironic humor....I wish McGurl’s choreographic direction would trust audience attention more by giving Anne some longer moments of repose where the text warrants. The performance presents an enjoyable thought experiment about the life of the underexposed companion to Shakespeare." Full Review

85
New York Theatre Wire

"Quite timely. The discursive structure and combative argument among four highly individualized women, laced with humor and pathos, allow for a differentiated view of an explosive topic...Director Hamilton Clancy brought together four superb actors with whom he produced, over an extended workshop process, a tight, well-paced performance of a smart play." Full Review

85
New York Theatre Wire

"Meadows has created a much fuller and more fitting portrait of Tubman than a $20 bill could ever present...Meadows performs with untiring energy...The performance brings to life the way stations of this woman with insight into the many painful conundrums...Performs an actor's tour de force as she brings to life the complex history of a remarkable person, always down-to-earth but with a soaring spirit." Full Review

80
New York Theatre Wire

"Takes us into Yiddishkeit and Yiddishland with all the requisite humor and pathos...A panoramic tapestry of Jewish immigrant life...Wasserman’s direction delineates for each actor a distinct personality in each scene and yet shapes the ensemble into flexible groupings that underscore the social aspect of the Jewish immigrant experience...The journey through the turbulent life of Yiddishland comes thus to an end and the audience like a huge family reunion is on its feet with joy." Full Review

65
New York Theatre Wire

"Cowhig wrote a lively play that compounds different cultural strands as they collide...Director Fan moves the cast with speed through the twelve scenes, however, I wish that he had trusted the text more...The deeper layer of the collage-like dramaturgy is lost to the audience by the hyper-energized physicalization of the text...The young enthusiastic cast is adept at executing the breakneck choreography but I would have liked to be able to empathize more with their inner lives." Full Review

85
New York Theatre Wire

"Performer/playwrights Lorinne Vozoff and Eduardo Machado contemplate the vicissitudes of age in three one-act plays...There is one line given to Duse which rings of contemporary truth and was delivered with great conviction by Vozoff: 'They don’t write parts for women in their 70s.' These three one-acts try to rectify that lack and are worth seeing for that reason—and the fact, that they render a vigorous image of what parts for older actors can contribute to the theater repertory." Full Review

80
New York Theatre Wire

"Paley's direction deftly moves the play which is a contest of ideas and perceptions between two highly spirited personalities. Inspired by Baraka’s life-long interest in jazz and its syncopated rhythms, she structures the verbal explosions, riffs, and variations of the arguments...Tyler Fauntleroy, as Taj, matches Sullivan’s Baraka in energy, intelligence, and fervor to 'do the right thing.' However, Kim Sullivan imbues Baraka also with vulnerability underneath his bluster." Full Review

85
New York Theatre Wire

"Author Douglas Lackey and director Alexander Harrington have managed to extract a thought-provoking stimulating performance from two of the most controversial public intellects of the twentieth century...Their conflict is presented through an exhilarating poignant dialogue...Simon and Stuyck are a superb pair, attuned to each other, finding the nuances, and portraying in subtle ways the impact on their relationship that their external reality imposes.” Full Review

60
New York Theatre Wire

"Josef's descent into the irrational underworld of power is told scene by scene -- grotesque, satirical, pathetic, and fantastic until his inevitable demise...Visnevski's adaptation is economical and theatrical...Dense script...Lee directed the work so 'eerily relevant to our own turbulent moment' and shares with the ensemble of actors...Perceptive works of art, such as Kafka's writing, endure beyond the transient and fashionable." Full Review

85
New York Theatre Wire

"Murder or suicide-this becomes the driving question for the duration of the performance as it meanders through the metamorphosing plot enacted by five superb pliable actors...The acting ensemble is virtuoso in maintaining rhythm, energy, pacing, and intelligibility while making switchblade changes in mood...They are riveting as they build this disparate vision of a world in disarray. It is peculiar how a work of art that is filled with human despair gives hope through the creative spirit." Full Review

80
New York Theatre Wire

"A hybrid of performance strategies...The video, interspersed with selective personal and archival footage, presents a parallel drama, a kind of augmented perspective to the written/read text. The live performance of Nina Hoss's delicate reading is balanced by Eribon's silent presence in the video...The sound design and music help to meld the dichotomous performance strands together...The text and the non-theatrical performance touched a chord in our time of hyped sensations." Full Review

80
New York Theatre Wire

"The play is structured like an epic folk tale and enriched with original music...Fulton brings to the stage several familiar tropes from 19th century Southern plantation life—some a bit too romantic, some with a 20th century perspective...Within those tropes, however, Ms. Fulton embeds the American racial malaise at the core of its racially mixed history. This is what drives the dramatic energy of the play...Come to the play and you will clap to a hopeful vision." Full Review

90
New York Theatre Wire

“Astounding scenes of powerful images…The poems become the source of experiences that the actors bring to life through movement and in dialogue, sometimes questioning, sometimes marveling…Zhadan sings his rock lyrics in hip-hop style with a fierce energy that befits rebellion…This magnificent performance encourages us to confront the ugliness with vigor and celebrate the beauty that human beings are capable of in the midst of tragedy and error.” Full Review

80
New York Theatre Wire

"Mason crafted a play that approximates the dimensions of a Greek tragedy but also infused it with 1970s black feminist sensibilities. Her language oscillates between poetic ritual and realistic discourse...Dowse directed a well-paced production in which the actors could fully explore the emotional range of their characters...Forty years later, it is worth reflecting on the trajectory of black women and their influence on African-American society and American culture at-large." Full Review