Ben Odom

Ben Odom is a critic with Plays to See. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (11)
Plays to See

"Among Feiffer’s already admirable canon of work, this one is even darker and effortlessly more topical...The fiery nature that Cat and Guy (played to perfection by Hamish Linklater) create together certainly makes for high drama, but also paints details in broad strokes. Their deep-seeded need for each other is obvious only to them. Our reluctant heroine seems to be the only one that cannot see how bad of a path this is leading her down." Full Review

Life x3
Chelsea
Plays to See

"Lacks the focus and purpose that permits each zinger to further escalate the action into childish behavior, and the incoherency of New Light Theater Project’s production seems to take out all the fun...It’s mostly snide without substance...Director Jerry Heymann follows Reza’s instruction of setting somewhat predictably, and doesn’t quite unite the cast under the game Reza is getting at. " Full Review

Plays to See

"It is does exactly what a satire should. The uncomfortable laughs are balanced with belly laughs, which director Moritz von Stuelpnagel keeps careful track of as the action escalates into chaos...But still, the play gets to us: like our admirably well-intentioned artists, we all want to do better, especially now. But to discover our faults, we must first allow ourselves to sometimes screw up. 'The Thanksgiving Play' gives the characters, and the audience in turn, a safe space to be unsafe." Full Review

Plays to See

"Its title inspires love, connection, loss, hope, fear: the work itself stirs in its audience all these ideas in the most unrelenting, heart-breaking, and powerful ways until its gut-wrenching conclusion...Lucas puts his characters and his audience through the ringer...Ambitious, but deftly and tactfully explored by this terrific ensemble and director Tyne Rafaeli’s steady direction...Count yourself lucky if you are there to witness its profundity." Full Review

Plays to See

"Manages to give a loving spotlight to three distinct and smart voices. 'Summer Shorts' binds together the intents and explorations of these playwrights into a succinct 90-minute showcase of what the new generation of writers is capable of. If one theme can be given, it would be this: the voices you don’t often hear, speaking to the issues you thought you knew all about." Full Review

Butler
Midtown E
Plays to See

"The witty dialogue forms the foundation for the relationships, and makes for a compelling way to trace history...The play paints a complex picture of the financial and political price of doing what is right, while creating characters that are quite funny and relatable. A lack of detail on the characters’ pasts or emotional stakes hinders deeper resonance with their stories, and the actors are not given many chances to be vulnerable with each other." Full Review

Skinnamarink
East Village
Plays to See

"The artists creating it and watching it are no doubt in agreement about the ridiculousness of the educational system, and this consensus plays to its strength and weakness in its exposition of the obvious...About as irreverent and nostalgic as a string of Peanuts comics, but with a larger dose of irony...It’s absurdism, but with a square-ness that keeps it within certain bounds. The commitment to this style is certainly admirable...But it makes for a sort of monotony." Full Review

Eve's Song
East Village
Plays to See

“Lloyd’s new comedy (or drama?) is unapologetic in its content, and blunt in its execution, and as a result, falls short of landing with sharp and distinct implication...Lloyd paints these figures in broad strokes...This sometimes causes the play to be performed as an opera: with soaring ambition, along with overwrought melodrama...The contributions of all creative voices...seem to erase nuance...Although the lead-up often struggles to compel, the pay-off is moving.” Full Review

Daniel's Husband
Midtown W
Plays to See

"As quickly as questions arise in Michael McKeever’s drama, they are shrouded in a plot resembling a procedural Lifetime film, redeemed primarily by the commitment of its cast...Then tragedy strikes. Even if I were to place a spoiler alert here, it wouldn’t weigh on your experience of the play, since the plot takes a sharp turn from here...The conversations at the center shift into a nasty battle of logistics, rather than a revelation of the changes that must be occurring in the characters." Full Review

The Beyonce
Midtown W
Plays to See

"Likely to excite fans of both Chekhov and intimate theater...The story is not one of love forlorn, against the crushing odds of the dangers on the outside. The world created by Bent and director Stephen Kaliski is built with love, a non-threatening retreat where Nadia can contemplate and decide...The sincerity Nadia exudes makes it impossible to judge her, and Bent so skillfully tickles the audience with her witty banter. It’s irresistible, and poignant exactly where it needs to be." Full Review

The Loon
Lower E Side
Plays to See

"Neither the dancing nor the text seems to complement the other, except in a few cohesive moments. The intellectualism from the speaker takes time to digest, and the modern expression from the dancers deserves it own spotlight...The forms rarely meld together, and they are not held together by a unified expression or a concrete story. An audience may be left wondering about the roles they played with each other, but will not likely be moved by the work done on either side." Full Review