Breanne L. Heldman

Breanne L. Heldman is a critic with Entertainment Weekly. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (16)
Entertainment Weekly

for a previous production "'The Woman in Black' is full of jumps and scares — in the most delightful way" Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"The show manages to balance the Broadway divas’ growth with Emma’s strength, the musical’s comedic moments, and the heartbreaking things the town does to reject her. But while 'The Prom' delivers important messages about acceptance, it only just scratches the surface on issues like homophobia and bullying...Kinnunen quickly proves to be a lead worthy of multiple songs highlighting her range...A good time and though it sometimes tries a little too hard, its heart is in the right place." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"The story is Just. Plain. Bad...The revival is made for modern audiences now living in the #MeToo era, and this production makes no effort to tell the tale through a fresh lens...It doesn’t help that three-time Tony nominee Mueller and two-time nominee Henry are devoid of chemistry and egregiously miscast...The dancing takes center stage in this production, and it’s one of the best things about it...This revival of 'Carousel' does have its strong points." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"The tale is as timely as ever...The four gods are all crowdpleasers with standout moments...But, while Salonga is undoubtedly the biggest Broadway draw of the bunch, her performance is overshadowed by Newell, whose energetic 'Mama Will Provide' is a highlight...Ti Moune’s sweetness and naiveté mixes with Kilgore’s killer pipes and dance moves for a dynamite performance filled with heart...Nothing feels rushed. It’s island time, after all, and it’s filled with joy." Full Review

Bandstand
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

“Cott and Osnes are worthy Broadway leads, with big voices and the energy and commitment to steer the show, but while they sounded great together, they lacked the spark that might’ve had me cheering for them to connect romantically…Blankenbuehler pulls double-duty as both choreographer and director here and manages with aplomb…'Bandstand' offers plenty to entertain in the moment, but despite its weighty theme, little lingers.” Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"The show is completely sung-through, which was common in the ’90s but feels a bit dated today. Further, much of those songs are sweeping, melodramatic ballads...Eva Noblezada is probably the show’s biggest wow (sorry, helicopter)...In general, this new iteration has a more appropriately gritty feel than the show had in the ’90s, from the physical set to the portrayal of Americans and the consequences of war. Still, it’s a pretty darn schmaltzy show to begin with." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

“The Tooting Arts Club’s production has infused the murder-filled Stephen Sondheim show with even more infectious and thrilling energy than typical…Secomb’s Todd is perfectly menacing…Sondheim’s music and lyrics fit beautifully into the small space…Ultimately, 'Sweeney Todd' is a tricky show. Sure, it’s about a dark, depraved, and murderous man…But it’s also meant to be a comedy…The Tooting Arts Club nails it. Theatergoers should count on having a bloody good time.” Full Review

In Transit
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

"Ultimately, it’s the talented cast that makes this a pleasant commute...The a cappella trope wore on me by the end. Seibert and Mackey each had big final numbers they could undoubtedly nail, but they fell a little flat when backed by oohs and ahs. Perhaps the songs deserved a more soaring composition. 'In Transit' arrives at its Broadway station safely and soundly, but misses the emotional connection needed to make it an express hit." Full Review

Tootsie (NYC)
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

“The musical within the musical...really works, as many moments do throughout — but the cliché factor doesn’t exactly drop to zero...That said, the show is damn funny...The performances are worthy of raves...Ultimately, the show has the good-time vibe of a jukebox musical, trading long-loved hit tunes for clever zingers and humor. And it makes an honest effort to recognize and support the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements, despite the plot’s inherent misalignment with them.” Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"Delivers the seasonal sunshine. It just doesn’t also bring a whole lotta depth...Of course, the music is terrific; Donna Summer isn’t the undisputed Queen of Disco for nothing. But this production lives or dies on the shoulders of its three Donnas — and they are incredible...Toe-tappingly familiar songs, stellar performances, shiny costumes, and a reminder of the impact of its subject on the music industry at large. It’s also a little thin on story." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"Urges its audience to '#StartListening', but struggles at times to relay a clear message of its own...Jackson's performance loosens as it goes and is especially noteworthy in the second act. Ridloff, however, is downright powerful from the moment she signs her first sentence...'Children of a Lesser God' hopes theatergoers will go home and give some deeper thought to the way they communicate...but the most lasting impression of the show is its two standout performances instead." Full Review

Seeing You
Chelsea
Entertainment Weekly

"This seemed an interesting question to pose in a theatrical setting, and one I expected would come back to haunt each audience member throughout the show. But, for the most part, it didn’t...Ultimately, I appreciate the courage it must take on behalf of the cast and crew to trust — and touch! — a new crowd of total strangers for every performance, but I would say 'Seeing You' isn’t all that worth seeing." Full Review

In & Of Itself
Gramercy
Entertainment Weekly

"Each tale eventually leads to an unexpected, jaw-dropping trick...As a storyteller, DelGaudio is undeniably compelling, making the show feel intimate and personal. As a magician, well, there’s a reason he’s collected so many awards for his work and served as a consultant on Christopher Nolan’s film 'The Prestige.' Ultimately, though, the true magic of the show is its philosophical consideration of illusion, identity, and perception." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"Unfortunately, the story is rather more bewildering than 'profound.' Amid a wealth of terrific, clever, laugh-out-loud dialogue are moments of total realness and others of supernatural wildness, yet none of it quite clicks into place...;How to Transcend a Happy Marriage' is funny and filled with great actors giving impressive, vulnerable performances. But ultimately, the lasting impression is less than the sum of its parts." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"If something is happening at the McKittrick Hotel, it’s probably worth doing. That’s a rule of thumb I’ve lived by since the first time I saw 'Sleep No More,' and it continues to be true with its new immersive theater experience…'The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart' isn’t your typical holiday fare, but it certainly has the warmth one might crave from the theater on a cold, wintery night." Full Review

Heisenberg
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

"Despite moving to a larger venue, the play is nothing if not intimate...Brokaw’s production itself is wisely bare-bones...The emphasis should be on these two opposites finding something intangible that they’re each missing, and any further frills might distract from that. Stephens’ script is jammed with insightful, unforgettable lines...The show has just enough comedy sprinkled throughout to keep the audience laughing and leave them with plenty to ponder." Full Review