Caroline McGinn

Caroline McGinn is a critic with Time Out London. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (12)
Middle (London)
Waterloo
Time Out London

Actors Claire Rushbrook and Daniel Ryan extract every nuance and layer from the characters. It’s clear from the rueful tittering, comments and applause at the end that the middle-aged couples in the audience can empathise only too well. Full Review

Time Out London

This glamorously staged misery monologue starring the wonderful Ruth Wilson got a full-throated standing ovation on opening night, but it left me totally cold. Full Review

Time Out London

You just don’t see this kind of energy and talent debuting every day. If Hanly can develop her considerable talent and sustain this manic pace ... then she will be a big star. Full Review

Time Out London

But the play’s a thin vehicle for all this plush furnishing and for a short piece, it has a long runtime. I was impressed by the talent and energy on display but I found myself wishing they’d picked a different play to lavish it on. Full Review

Time Out London

I didn’t really know how to feel. This is [an] imaginative, ambitious drama that’s stimulating even if it doesn’t add up to more than the sum of its parts. I look forward to seeing what [the creative team] do next. Full Review

King Charles III
Midtown W
Time Out London

for a previous production "Writing iambic pentameter peppered with pop references is a masterstroke: this is a play that looks like the future and sounds like the past; the perfect form to portray the royal family. Rupert Goold has classily directed a state-of-the-nation play. You need to see this one now: it’s too hotly topical to last...It’s theatrical dynamite, nonetheless." Full Review

Time Out New York

"Yup, you heard it. New York’s hottest ticket is a middle-aged white man rapping. That man is James McAvoy: booted and buzzcut like a Glaswegian squaddie and stripped to the waist. For nearly three hours he spits fire, spraying lyrical pearls at his enemies, nailing rap battles and chucking his battered heart beneath the feet of the woman he loves, Roxane." Full Review

Time Out London

Writers are fighters and the word is everything in this firecracker show about passion, rejection, and the crazy genius of the spoken word. The rapiers, intrigue and censorship of Cardinal Richelieu’s Paris, circa 1640, are modernised as razor-sharp banter about love, sex, and – nudge, wink – cultural appropriation. Full Review

Time Out London

I would take older children or fans to see this and be confident they’d find something to enjoy and to argue about afterwards. But it’s no ‘War Horse’, and certainly no ‘Northern Lights’. Full Review

Time Out London

for a previous production The first half was a bit too broad and noisy to tug on your heartstrings … happily, the second half stepped up into a higher register, thanks to Christopher Nightingale’s joyful choral arrangements. The Christmas miracle arrives in the manner of a very posh panto … and it hits the spot. Full Review

Time Out London

Those ancient legends are powerful stuff in any era. But their takes on cruelty, sex and gender ... feel very ‘now’. The four fantastic actors ... totally own the space. Directors Sean Holmes and Holly Race Roughan bind [this ensemble piece] together with a light, playful tone and a fast pace that never drags. Full Review

Time Out London

“The real mystery...is not whodunit but, in its currently mediocre state, whydoit at all...This is a walking, talking piece of theatre history and the most expensive museum exhibit in London...A thin and campy shadow of its former self, whose creaks arise from cliché not suspense. Christie's best thrillers have a psychological conviction and a subtle sense of evil that the current cast shelve in favour of xenophobic exaggeration or dullness." Full Review