Chris McCormack

Chris McCormack is a critic with Musings in Intermission. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (13)
The Perplexed
Midtown W
Front Row Center

Score: 65%. "There is a great deal of motion here, but there is no There there. This play is reminiscent of 'You Can't Take It With You' but lacks the connective tissue necessary to make it all work." Full Review

Happy Birthday Doug
Soho/Tribeca
Front Row Center

for a previous production Score: 75% "These characters blend together in a slow current, albeit often hilarious, looking for a destination. It is light fare delivered by a master story teller. I was hoping for something more layered." Full Review

Front Row Center

Score: 90% "This Christmas Carol is a select buffet of a tale. Jack Thorne has played fast and loose with the details while leaving the story itself in tact. Ebenezer Scrooge (Campbell Scott) is bordering on psychotic. The ghosts are all women. The English accents are varied or absent." Full Review

Arlington
Brooklyn
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "A tremendous exploration of the transcending of circumstance...Walsh – he also directs – and the creative team combine stunning effects with playful physicality: think Christopher Nolan meets Charlie Chaplin. There are neat tricks in Jamie Vartan’s set, with the design team making Isla’s room come alive. Jack Phelan provides some of the most stirring video work that’s been seen on an Irish stage and Emma Martin’s choreography is visceral." Full Review

A Younger Theatre

for a previous production "These killer one-liners – delivered with the camp, chewed up expressions that Arcade no doubt picked up from her time in the 1960’s Playhouse of the Ridiculous – sustain a rather academic entreaty...More so, there is desperation in Arcade’s fear-filled eyes, having seen the decline of 1960s revolutionaries and Warholian superstars, and the rising dominance of political-correctness epitomized by today’s Millennials...Arcade is drug, sex and rock’n’roll, a damn champion of the counter-culture." Full Review

Charolais
Midtown E
BroadwayWorld

for a previous production “Digging up the dark pastures of rural Ireland, Stapleton conveys the fears of isolation and repressed emotion that sometimes makes romance difficult…Stapleton's themes of lust and loneliness have so imaginative a range as to cross species…After the action reaches a striking and violent conclusion, there is a sense of new life in a depraved place. Artfully, Stapleton's play is just as pastoral in bringing land and people together.” Full Review

Pondling
Midtown E
Musings in Intermission

for a previous production "Between the laughs one wishes that she would land softer on some deliveries so as to let us side with her emotionally. Some of these passages can be breathtaking. This burst of new writing is thick with rich textures and vibrant descriptions. It's final lesson of sweet humility, intelligently maneuvered, suggests that the talent behind this honeyed play about childhood crushes is far from naive." Full Review

Front Row Center

Score: 85% "The 'olden days' are not so olden here...Prejudice and pride live in 1930 Harlem just as much as they do today. Even more striking is that this play was written in 1995, when the closets were filled with people hiding, and birth control was considered a done deal." Full Review

Maz and Bricks
Midtown E
Front Row Center

Score: 70%. "This is a sort of romantic travelogue with a touch of politics, a touch of self-doubt, shame, and of course hope. What it was lacking was a large dose of character and action to balance out the touches." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production "Walsh’s vigorous production is unafraid of incoherence, moving as if through swathes of irreducible despair. What gradually comes into focus is the heartrending picture of a household in mourning...Walsh translated repression into strikingly kinetic images...A verbally absurdist quality. That makes the script’s abrupt leaps into other narratives feel fitting...It’s immensely satisfying – then it all sobers up for the ending. Murphy is flawless in this electric production." Full Review

BroadwayWorld

for a previous production “‘The Women Speak’ achingly articulates the ramshackle body of the female in nationalist Ireland…That all these calamities run into ‘Come and Go,’ a choreographed drama about three gossipy women on a bench, brings new consequence…‘I can feel the rings’ claims one of them at the end, though according to Beckett's instructions none are apparent. Yet there are circular lines in Scaife's haunting production: those repeated tragedies of Ireland's women, still revolving today.” Full Review

A Younger Theatre

for a previous production "An adaptation that Hynes, extraordinarily, stages with sustained pace and rigour...As a whole, the event is a thundering achievement in ownership of Shakespeare’s histories, not just in terms of craft but also in a sense of Irish authorship...'Druid' harnesses the Henriad in its power not to debase but to challenge the hierarchy. Irish artists have been too long hesitant to touch this epic for the difficult colonial history between nations, a resistance that now feels triumphantly overcome." Full Review

Musings in Intermission

for a previous production "Director Gavin Quinn, stupefying the conventionality of theatre and our expectations of such, pulls the floor right out from under us...Pan Pan's 'The Seagull' doesn't walk us to that all too common line between traditional and avant garde but rather traces the transference of text between them; a stream of information that regenerates and changes constantly." Full Review