Corey Cohen

Corey Cohen is a critic with The Cultural Critic. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (8)
The Cultural Critic

"The real superstar of ‘SpongeBob,’ the person who makes it all work, is the yellow sponge himself; well, the actor playing him. Newcomer Ethan Slater is a one-man rocket of energy and positivity, you can't help but love him the second he opens his mouth at the top of the show. Slater's portrayal of the titular character is infectious, his joy radiates throughout the theater…With everything happening in our country these days, the optimistic SpongeBob may be the hero we need." Full Review

The Cultural Critic

"Borle gives a superstar performance...Borle makes his Wonka equal parts deranged, silly, malicious, and sweet. You can’t help but keep your eyes glued to see what he’ll do next...This production does have some problems. The set is minimal...Some of the jokes are immature. Ultimately though, this musical provides an enjoyable night out for the family...'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory' has plenty of laughs, some sweet moments, and puts a smile on your face for two hours." Full Review

Bandstand
Midtown W
The Cultural Critic

“Corey Cott (as Donny) is Broadway's newest superstar. Laura Osnes (Julia) is perfect in her leading role. We see brilliant performances from the quadrupally talented Joe Carroll on drums, Brandon James Ellis on bass, & James Nathan Hopkins on sax...The score is fun and catchy, led by two emotional show-stoppers ‘Love Will Come and Find Me Again’ and especially ‘Welcome Home.’ The latter has a haunting chorus while revealing the struggles our heroes face.” Full Review

The Cultural Critic

“Tevye's situation isn't exclusive to the village of Anatevka; it's still happening a century later all over the world. In too many other lands, people are still driven from their homes. There's no one place for these people to go, and this production masterfully makes the point as the show concludes…It's easy to fall into the trap of acting goofy and showy as Tevye, but Danny Burstein hits just the right note. Tevye seems to be a role that Burstein was born to play.” Full Review

The Cultural Critic

"This show simply shows reality for all that it is - the slow, the uncomfortable, the charming, the joyous. Because of how authentic the story seems, you feel immersed in this Middle Eastern environment…The enchanting score is composed by David Yazbek who is uniquely suited (he's part-Lebanese/part-Jewish) to put music to this story. The tune ‘Welcome to Nowhere’ is particularly brilliant in how it introduces the Egyptians (and the audience) to the desolate town of Bet Hatikvah." Full Review

The Cultural Critic

for a previous production "’The Play That Goes Wrong’ isn't only funny, it is a masterful demonstration of craft. The writing and direction were in the same vein, tying a perfect and complex knot and knowing exactly how to untie everything…I have never laughed more or harder than when seeing ‘The Play That Goes Wrong.’ There were moments in which I couldn't find a moment to get a good breath in because I was too busy laughing." Full Review

The Cultural Critic

"One of the triumphs is how it so incredibly captures the culture of Newfoundland. It's a Canadian/Irish blend that is unlike anything we've seen in theater, and everyone involved clearly went above and beyond to accurately reflect the area. The score and book, by the married couple Irene Sankoff & David Hein, sounds authentic...What makes ‘Come From Away’ work is that it displays the exceptional generosity of humanity that took place in Newfoundland. This brings to Broadway a story of hope." Full Review

The Cultural Critic

"Andrew Lloyd Webber bought the rights to the story and has turned it into a full-scale musical with new tunes by him, while retaining several of the film's songs. The transfer from the mostly-spoken film is natural because the subject matter is music. Webber has nicely expanded the old material and added new dimensions…This whole enterprise needed an acceptable substitute for Jack Black. Fortunately, Alex Brightman is more than that." Full Review