Dan Callahan

Dan Callahan is a critic with The L Magazine. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (16)
85
Village Voice

"What’s most impressive about Leaf’s biographical play ‘Pushkin’...is that Leaf never chooses the easy way out for himself or for his audience...This is an ambitious drama in verse, conceived on a large scale...Leaf re-creates a whole lost Russian society on the stage, without ever making the mistake of trying too hard to underline contemporary resonances...Lassiter is perfect both visually and emotionally." Full Review

80
Village Voice

“Greer staged some of the first scenes in this 'Black Glove' so that the actors are a little too far away from the audience; the performers, too, have to fight against the insistent hum of the sound system. But everyone here plays with such gusto, and the writing is so rich and strange, that these are only minor impediments...This tough-minded yet vivifying point of view is something that children should learn early...‘The Black Glove’ might be just the thing for them.” Full Review

60
Mud
Village Voice

“Humor emerges occasionally in this new production...Fornés provides a smidgen of pity for Lloyd and Henry before finally giving them both the back of her hand; this tricky maneuver stays true to the tone of Fornes' play, which is uncommonly blunt and compressed, closed-down yet also somehow open...May's striving for something better has a slightly sentimental feeling in this production, whereas Fornés seems to have intended something darker and nastier." Full Review

65
Village Voice

"The show often achieves an intriguing balance via the deeply romantic nature of this music and the increasing desperation of van Gogh’s letters to his brother...The only real problem with 'Van Gogh’s Ear' is the casting of Carter Hudson as van Gogh...The music is regularly transporting...The music and the imagery start to interact and to challenge each other, but unfortunately, whenever the music stops, the words, as delivered by Hudson, bring things to a screeching halt." Full Review

85
Village Voice

"There are more ideas chewed up and invigoratingly spit out in five minutes of Howard Barker’s 65-minute 'Pity in History' than in many plays of greater length...The meaty flavor of his writing is so intense, and his point-of-view shifts so seamless, that our expected reactions to what his characters say are constantly being thwarted, waylaid, even mocked...'Pity in History' has both the thrill of destruction and the nourishment of creation." Full Review

35
Brooklyn Magazine

"According to the program, the Debate Society spent seven years working on 'The Light Years,' and what has resulted is a strange, bewilderingly random series of scenes...There seems to be nothing happening on stage in 'The Light Years'—there is nothing at stake, and no narrative really emerges...Some of the actors manage to make individual moments come briefly alive...Might have some charm in a small storefront space, but it doesn’t have any impact at all in this venue." Full Review

40
Brooklyn Magazine

"There’s the start of an interesting idea in Jordan Harrison’s play 'Marjorie Prime,' which has a vaguely futuristic sort of premise, but it never comes to fruition...Nothing is fleshed out, and so it is impossible to be moved by the absence portrayed during the last scene of the play because that absence has been present, unfortunately, all along." Full Review

40
Brooklyn Magazine

"The big problem with 'Would You Still Love Me If…' is that every scene is played as a matter of life-and-death conflict and there is no build-up to the main drama...Turner does what she can with this script, but there are instances where characters just reappear randomly or meet coincidentally that cannot be smoothed over. Anastasi has bitten off far more than he can chew with this play, but Turner and company give it their best shot." Full Review

40
Village Voice

"All these elements make for a rich subject for a play, but this production of 'Imperfect Love' feels presentational, inert, and underpopulated...The actors here are all in their own worlds, not listening to one another closely enough, and they play too often on one note without change or variation. Sometimes the writing can be monotone as well...This production conveys that momentous event — as with most of the occurrences it depicts — in a stiff and unconvincing manner." Full Review

70
Village Voice

"The writing in the first act is cogent and judicious, or so it seems as played by Burton and McGrath, both of whom give the kind of detailed performances that can only come from extensive preparation and concentration...'Planet' could still use some cutting, but it is slightly better in some ways than its first reviews might indicate, and that’s what can happen to a play when it is given a superior production with deeply felt performances." Full Review

70
Village Voice

"Both Pelletier and Ardelius are ideally cast in their roles...But there is an imbalance here in the writing. The first act lasts for an hour and a half, and so all the scenes where Blixen is yelling at or manipulating Bjørnvig get tiring...Yet this look at Blixen’s last great platonic love affair is studded with some of the best observations from her stories and interviews, and these lines, as delivered by Pelletier, have a romantic force that lingers." Full Review

40
Village Voice

"It becomes almost immediately apparent that we are dealing with a hilariously simplistic play that wants to function as a strained allegory about learning to tolerate difference...The marionette work here is so tentative that it feels like both Michael and George have been plunged into their task without adequate training…In the midst of this bewildering whack-a-mole symbolism, Danie Steel gives a snazzy sketch-comedy performance." Full Review

65
Village Voice

“Pendleton has succeeded admirably by keeping his actors at a medium-rare level of intensity…But Foote’s intention here seems somewhat overly concerned with explaining poor behavior and assorted other problems through bad parenting…With her patrician looks and manner, Lichty would probably be more at home in a Philip Barry drawing room than on a porch in Texas. This Georgette seems like a woman we don’t need to worry about." Full Review

70
Brooklyn Magazine

"'Antlia Pneumatica' is eccentric and difficult but rewarding, filled with tangents and blocks of unsteady information...This play is like an explosion of matter that cannot be put back into any proper order, and Washburn sees a freedom in that. She likes to have her characters speak of small things and large things but skips the middle ground that most plays reside in. This might be irritating to some, but to others it will be liberating: post-play, post-apocalyptic, lost in space." Full Review

45
Brooklyn Magazine

"Detached from Bergman’s own directorial control and talent, do these texts have any value on their own? On the basis of this 'Nora,' the answer is most likely no...This production falls apart in its final stretch...'Doll’s House' is still a play that can speak to audiences...But it might be that it needs the full force of what Ibsen himself wrote rather than the stripped-down essence that only Bergman himself could make fully alive in the theater." Full Review

25
The L Magazine

"It’s a kind of party stunt, and it’s admirable in its over-exerted sort of way. But the gags in between are so unfunny that no amount of effort can put them over." Full Review