David Fox

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Reviews (19)
60
Reclining Standards

"The opening explosion removes any sense of normal suburban existence, which 'Curse' absolutely needs if the satire is to sting as it should...The play has much more bite if they are trying to keep up the middle-class illusion, despite everything going wrong around them...I actually thought the cast was pretty strong throughout...I’d like to have seen this cast with a different director—I really think the ingredients are there, but it doesn’t catch fire." Full Review

40
Reclining Standards

"CK: We share general feelings on the play itself—chiefly, that it’s over-obvious and sanctimonious. I certainly felt the overly straightforward nature of this production did the play no favors. More than ever, it seemed like a parable that’s been plotted within an inch of its life...DF: Bening’s clearly a fine stage actor, but here she seems so deliberately drabbed down that it’s almost showy. Neither she nor Tracy Letts—also a terrific actor—ever convinced me they were a married couple." Full Review

95
Reclining Standards

“One of the most thrilling evenings of theater...The beauty of the work is the perfect sense of orchestration, coupled with an indelible and authentic feeling of lives truly lived. ‘The Ferryman’...moves seamlessly from extended monologues and intimate, two-character conversations, to massive scenes...Butterworth brings to all of it an ear for the poetry of common speech...Even more, he, Mendes, and the superb cast unerringly find the heart of every character and situation.” Full Review

65
Reclining Standards

"Even in a compromised production, it should not be missed...Responsibility for this moderately enjoyable 'Saint Joan'—which never gets near enough to greatness—rests mostly with director Daniel Sullivan, who continues a pattern of delivering fluidly competent productions that lack intellectual rigor and specific insights...Rashad has considerable talent, and here she scores some good points as the warrior Joan. But she fails to suggest her naturalness and charm." Full Review

60
Reclining Standards

"In several touching vignettes, we get a visceral sense of the pain, frustration...Whether this makes for a workable play is another story. Vignettes are one thing, but cohesiveness is another...Directed with a fluidity and visual panache that sometimes undermines the script, 'Otto' emerges as rambling and episodic, feeling both unfinished and overlong...Focus gets lost amid too many storylines...Stellar cast...Both not enough and way, way too much." Full Review

45
Reclining Standards

“‘Whirligig’ is likely to remind you of other recent works, and the comparisons aren’t flattering…None of this precludes some misty-eyed enjoyment, and ‘Whirligig’ has some winning qualities. The deal breaker for me is mawkishness…There are some sweet character vignettes, expertly drawn by both the writer and the cast…But ‘Whirligig’ is circuitous and overwrought…Though ‘Whirligig’ spins and spins, Hamish Linklater’s bumpy, overwritten play never finds an anchor.” Full Review

60
Reclining Standards

“One of the great plays of its moment—hell, of any moment…It’s as wonderful—and as fresh—as ever. It deserves better than director Trip Cullman’s glossy, shallow revival. In Cullman’s hands, within the first few minutes, all three central characters reveal their least appealing traits…Guare’s script is filled with beautiful, lyrical ruminations on our passions and foibles. Seen here, played at high speed and with sitcom-y aggressiveness, they barely register." Full Review

65
Reclining Standards

"The resulting production is flawed—for me, key elements of Wilder’s tone are sometimes missing—but I’m very grateful to have seen it...'Skin of Our Teeth' needs to begin with at least a superficial connection to a real, recognizable world. In Arbus’s production, there isn’t much of that...Still, there are lovely, memorable things throughout Arbus’s production...I wish that 'Skin of Our Teeth'—an allegory and a fable for sure—didn’t look quite so allegorical as it does here." Full Review

55
Reclining Standards

“The good part, unsurprisingly, is the theater stuff…Shawn the playwright has a wonderful ear for theatrical badinage...The second half of ‘Talk House’ is a blunt, tedious political satire…I’m not sorry I saw ‘Talk House.’ There’s considerable pleasure in the early scenes, and on some level, it’s enjoyable to watch these terrific theater actors talk about pretty much anything. But it is certainly a lot of talk—and ultimately, not much heat.” Full Review

85
DF Reviews

"The current production sets a new standard, and it certainly refreshes the play. What van Hove does – quite brilliantly – is to reduce ‘View’ to its essence…His ‘View’ works so well in large part because it’s done so simply, by an ensemble of superb actors...But there are a number of new touches at least as overwrought as the traditional ones...On balance, though, this 'View from the Bridge' is a production that should be seen by anyone interested in Miller and his work." Full Review

45
Reclining Standards

"Michael Urie is a charmer for sure, and it was fun to watch him channel the great Phil Silvers. That comic’s flint-edged style isn’t a natural fit for Urie, but he made a game try and exuded personality...Even the couple of hit songs that come from this show aren’t especially strong. Both would have sunk without a trace in a better musical. Which leaves Jerome Robbins’ choreography. Again, it’s far from his best work...It was a lame finish to a wan Encores! season." Full Review

80
Reclining Standards

"Essentially, Blitzstein makes the same point over and over again...I haven’t had much patience for Doyle’s style in the past, but it’s an excellent fit for 'Cradle,' which, as presented here, in a lean 90 minutes with an ensemble of ten performers who stay in stage throughout, is also optimally suited for the Classic Stage Company space...If there are moments when Doyle pushes too hard—as in unnecessarily literal use of money thrown around the stage—well, it goes with territory." Full Review

40
Reclining Standards

"I freely admit I’m not in a position to judge its accuracy, but what I hear is dialogue that feels highly constructed, with flashes of cleverness and wit, heavily laced with Guirgis’s signature barrage of expletives. It doesn’t suggest 'authenticity' to me so much as the sassy cousin of funny TV writing, deliberately made racy for shock value...You certainly won’t find much depth in Phylicia Rashad’s flashy, shallow production, though Guirgis doesn’t help." Full Review

45
Reclining Standards

"Lurid, overwrought...Nothing is said once if it can shouted several dozen times by a spasmodic chorus and motley crew of principals...Theme will be beaten into the ground several hundred times...'Grand Hotel' is short but relentless...Davis's book mainly reduces complicated action to song cues...Aside from a couple of effective numbers, it's undistinguished...The show itself proved a relic unworthy of resurrection...'Grand Hotel' is its own best parody." Full Review

65
Reclining Standards

"At its best, 'Fulfillment Center' moves almost imperceptibly between realism and a poetic alternate reality...For me, 'Fulfillment Center' was most satisfying as a vehicle for its actors, all of whom were ideally cast and excellent...There’s some lovely moment-to-moment communication, funny and heartbreaking. Yet, in the end, I found 'Fulfillment Center,' well, not entirely fulfilling." Full Review

70
Reclining Standards

"I loved every minute of the first hour, which is full of Baker’s magical, mordant wit and, like the best of her work, constantly destabilizing...Neugebauer’s production strikes the perfect naturalistic note—before departing from it...There are many wonderful things in 'The Antipodes.' But as the show went on, I felt a sense of Baker losing her way. A monologue for one of the two female characters starts like gangbusters, but goes on too long—much the same could be said of 'The Antipodes.'" Full Review

85
Reclining Standards

"Altogether extraordinary, wayward, deconstructed, likely-to-be-polarizing production of 'Glass Menagerie.' Weeks later, I’m still wrapping my mind around it...Much of what happens in this production should, I think, come as a surprise. But I’ll say this—Ferris’ entrance on the stage is one of the most affecting moments I’ve ever seen in a theater...I disagree with most of Sam Gold’s big conceptual ideas—yet I’ve never seen a 'Glass Menagerie' that feels so devastatingly right." Full Review

80
Reclining Standards

"'Everybody' is an absolute delight, which is something said of 'Everyman' by nobody ever...Jacobs-Jenkins’ love of bold theatricality is amply evident here, including some quite marvelous visual wizardry in Lila Neugebauer’s staging...Raucous, edgy humor abounds in 'Everybody,' but what’s more impressive is that some of the somber, introspective heart of the original play is preserved. On the other hand, what’s lost here that is central to 'Everyman' is a sense of shock and awe." Full Review

90
Philadelphia Magazine

for a previous production "Though Holter’s playwrighting voice is distinctively his, there’s a bit of Aaron Sorkin in the thrust-and-parry word play, with every character achieving implausibly virtuosic feats of articulation...'Exit Strategy' is immensely enjoyable for all those same, Sorkin-esque reasons. There’s a wide range of tone here — from raw desolation to high comedy, and Holter manages it masterfully. He’s especially skillful at orchestrating large conversations. Director Kip Fagan’s production is terrific." Full Review