Diana Barth

Diana Barth is a critic with Epoch Times. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (50)
70
Epoch Times

"The play’s style is stark, terse, and direct, like the text. The gray garb of all participants except the three leading players creates a pleasant monotone sense of a black-and-white film—Welles’s métier...Not as exciting as it could have been, perhaps, 'Maverick' offers a welcome glimpse into an earlier era of theatrical activity, and into the personality of a genius who burst like a flaming candle onto the scene and, sadly, flickered out at the end.” Full Review

85
Epoch Times

“Spot-on vocal ‘portrayals’ of birds, pigs, cows, and a Christmas turkey...Formerly a student at the famed École Jacques Lecoq in Paris, Murfi has the superior vocal and mimetic skills required to portray whatever he sets his mind on. But aside from technical facility—Murfi can go from a deep baritone to high falsetto when required—there is the heart and soul of an Irishman portraying some of his countrymen and women and their place in their world." Full Review

45
Epoch Times

“Hellman’s point doesn’t come across, either in the text of the play or in this current performance. J.R. Sullivan’s direction is colorless and bland. Some of that sense may, however, come from the writing. It’s hard to know where to focus one’s attention. Therefore, I can’t comment specifically on any one performance...As is usual with Mint productions, design values are excellent...Feiner’s set is beautiful, but I quibble that perhaps it is too elegant.” Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"Medoff's play presents a love story between Sarah, a young woman deaf from birth, and her speaking teacher James...But more than that, the play takes on the conflict between the deaf who would prefer not being forced to accommodate to a hearing world...Although not a perfect production, it has an aura of sweetness and a gentle tension that smacks of a slightly different time. And performances, under Leon's direction, are uniformly excellent. Well worth seeing." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"The final scene is both heartbreaking and heartwarming. Even just reading the script brings tears to my eyes. Perhaps it is just one of those things that one cannot fully express in words...Lovingly directed...The production is a theatrical gem, despite the limits of space and budget...In spite of playwright Weller's placing the play in Coney Island, the Old Country permeates in its insistent darkness; and I mean that as a compliment." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"'Muswell Hill' strikes many a chord in American viewers, particularly those of a sophisticated, or, perhaps, a neurotic, bent...They’re entertaining to watch from afar. Not many of us would want to be guests at this party...Excellent performances by all six performers, under Patterson’s taut direction, with the standout performances by three very attractive and skilled actresses at full pitch…‘Muswell Hill’ gets my vote as a sleeper hit." Full Review

75
Epoch Times

"The work might be more accurately adjudged to be a theater piece rather than a play. It lacks the direct interplay of a typical play. But the philosophy expounded appears to strike home...The appealing Vardalos holds the stage confidently, with excellent support from the other players. It is another production from the Public Theater, stressing the warmer, more humane aspects of humanity." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

“Fashioned out of love, remembrance, and Ruhl’s imagination, the play unfolds to tell us a story about family and mortality…Director Les Waters has done a terrific job of coordinating all the elements…The mix of reality and fantasy is ultimately charming and moving. What may have seemed light becomes layered with thoughts of mortality and questions of how one is to live one’s life: How can one be useful? Is one person more important than another?” Full Review

90
Epoch Times

“Those of us lucky enough to have viewed the great physical comedy performance this season by Kevin Kline in ‘Present Laughter’ now have the privilege of viewing a second such remarkable performance by Urie…The curtain falls. We have been greatly entertained. But mightn’t we also be a bit uncomfortable?...Is it possibly a mirror of ourselves? And of our governing officials?...'The Government Inspector' is a hilarious comedy, beautifully cast and acted." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

“A unique magic show...The show concerns itself with more than magic. It probes the viewer’s mind, inviting him to examine what identity is, really. As the show is interspersed with illusion, one may indeed begin to question formerly held conceptions…The show was at times mesmerizing, and never less than interesting. You can do worse than going downtown to the Daryl Roth Theatre and picking out your own card.” Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"Too much praise cannot be heaped upon Abili, who embodies Emperor Jones in body and mind, his taut actor’s intelligence merging with his role. Furthermore, in addition to portraying the viciousness of the character, he makes us feel compassion for this tortured man. Kudos to O’Reilly, whose directing brought about a stunning rendition of this important theater work." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"The acting company is outstanding, with six actors of the company performing in both plays. As I saw both shows in one day, it was fascinating to see the differences in characterizations performed by Mac Rae, Patterson, Elless, Vickers, Cariani, and Jennifer Piech...In general, the performances might be adjudged as a bit 'over-the-top'...I suspect what might be called 'stylization' was the choice of director Cummings, and for me, this was a pleasure." Full Review

75
Epoch Times

"An electrifying performance by Jo Lampert as the central character fuels 'Joan of Arc: Into the Fire'...What sets this show apart from a placid retelling of history is the high-tension mix of the best of stagecrafts...Unison movement rivaling the most disciplined work by, say, the New York City Ballet corps...It shows how sticking to one’s principles may ultimately have a remarkable result—even to the point of creating positive change in the hearts, minds, and behavior of many people." Full Review

70
Epoch Times

"More could have been developed on the subject of class, which is so potent and seldom addressed in our society...The performances, under the direction of Jerry Ruiz, are both fine and give the script more dimension than is tangibly evident in the spare writing...Perhaps it is because of unanswered questions and a bit of teasing by the playwright that 'Fade' is a good bet for an evening at the theater." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"The title of this zany, entertaining show comes from playwright and performer Monica Piper’s early childhood experience of being told by a playmate that she 'wasn’t that Jewish'...Piper got over it...You don’t have to be Jewish to enjoy this show. Piper is a winning performer able to make very clear any of the Yiddish-isms she spouts. I recommend the show for anyone who wants to enjoy hearty laughs in a comfortable, cozy setting." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"'She Stoops to Conquer' encompasses all the tricks of that trade: mistaken identity, extreme characterizations, convoluted and zany plot lines, and miraculously favorable outcomes...Staged in a bare bones’ style, Evans lets the ridiculous but guileful text speak for itself...In addition to being simply comedic, it is layered with societal elements that are universal and timeless...Performances are first-rate...A lively and entertaining evening." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"That the play does not dissolve into simply a fable of generalities is a tribute to both Ibsen and Harrower...Potent questions are posed. Can one live a life without compromise? Do hypocrisy and deceit rule the world? These questions appear to be universal and ongoing...Under Hal Brooks’s attentive direction the actors perform well, with Nilaja Sun, John Keating, and Arielle Goldman being standouts." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"A remarkable, taut, spicy satire of contemporary manners...The ultimate solution of the mystery throws the whole set of characters into free fall, with a resulting unexpected and striking changing of partners. Just like sometimes happens in real life. To some of us. Along the way we are treated to some terrific and imaginative staging by director Kimberly Senior, including several sharp and beautifully executed dance sequences by the cast." Full Review

75
Epoch Times

“Performances by Kaye, Spears, Duffy, and Chaffee are excellent, with strong support by others mentioned, plus Amanda Whiteley, Christo Grabowski, and Jesse Garlick. Jim Petosa’s direction is oddly inconsistent, with many characters unnecessarily remaining onstage during others’ scenes, which, to me, made no point and was sometimes even distracting. But, overall, ‘Good’ is strong, vital theater and is definitely apropos given today’s political climate in the United States.” Full Review

70
Epoch Times

“Although not always clear, the play does have some lovely moments...Owen Campbell’s sensitive Daniel, and Elise Kibler’s alternately feisty and dreamy Izzy. Joe Tippett’s Jeremy, though brimming with enthusiasm, is a bit over the top at times and could use some toning down. Less might prove more for him...Director Carolyn Cantor has done a fine job of coordinating all the elements and keeping the pacing moving along smoothly.” Full Review

80
Epoch Times

“The spareness and simplicity of Magda Willi’s minimalist cream-and-white set engage the audience...Gillian Anderson’s vivid Blanche is tougher than many other interpretations, making her downfall all the more extreme and meaningful as she gradually disintegrates...Ben Foster’s Stanley struts like a proud rooster throughout, but was for my taste a bit too one-note...Altogether, a terrific theatrical offering and a fine Tennessee Williams rendition.” Full Review

95
Epoch Times

"The work is tremendously complex…The play’s final, very long monologue gives Phylicia Rashad, alone on stage, the opportunity to display a power and breadth of emotion not often found in American writing. Rashad makes the most of this opportunity and executes a tour-de-force performance. Director Tina Landau rises to the occasion in conveying the play’s depth and importance." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

“In Jacobs-Jenkins’s new comedy/drama ‘Gloria’, several low echelon editorial assistants at an unnamed Manhattan cultural magazine are spending a typical day at work. All appears calm and relatively stress free. But a harrowing event brings about a sea change in everyone’s behavior...’Gloria’ has the benefit of a terrific artistic team, from director Cabnet, to an extremely talented cast of six actors, many of whom double so convincingly that it’s difficult to detect." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"In the sensitive hands of director Mimi O’Donnell, each character’s complexities are brought out...'Nice Girl' digs into the souls of some ordinary people, searching for their own right path." Full Review

95
Epoch Times

"It is funny and sometimes silly. But actually if one digs beneath the gags and David’s outlandish interpretation—wide eyes and widely spread arms, as if bewildered by the goings-on—there are some deep and even poignant issues dealt with." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

“It’s lovely to see how a simple twist of a hip can suggest a woman who is annoyed, and a tugging gesture at the armpits can suggest an ill-fitting bra...A program note indicates that encounters Murfi had with groups of older people in Sligo helped formulate these remarkable theater pieces...In addition...it is a tremendous pleasure to witness the remarkable Murfi, dressed in pants, suspenders, and a shirt, take stage so effectively with nary a prop save for a chair.” Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"The play is an earthy depiction of a small group of individuals living on the edge of society...Most of the first act is spent in chatting, not going anywhere special. The two-hour show could profit by a little judicious cutting. But later, another man enters the picture and livens up the doings...The performances are quite good...Lovers of Irish theater and down-to-earth naturalism should like this one." Full Review

75
Epoch Times

“A fervent depiction of a love-hate relationship among a family of four, a kind of intense ping-pong game for the production’s three-and-a-half hours on stage...The text of the play arguably compares to opera...The work presents an authentic human tragedy...Irons does a fine job as the family patriarch, against tough odds. Manville’s early scenes display an uncomfortable sing-song-y vocal pattern, but smooths out as the play ensues.” Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"Covers a lot of ground: political correctness, discrimination and the reverse of it, white privilege, affirmative action. And hypocrisy...This provocative play, directed by Aukin, has universally fine performances, with particular praise for Hecht and the quirky McDonough, who bring to life the many contradictions and uncertainties that Harmon’s play sets forth." Full Review

70
Epoch Times

“The production is light and lively, with many fine performances and offers many pluses; however, it lacks one particular element which prevents it from being the superlative production it might have been...What’s missing, then? Heart and soul...More emphasis on the poetry might have lent greater variety to the play, as well as a sense of greater depth...One gets a strong sense of the repertory quality of the performance, which is a pleasure to see.” Full Review

65
Epoch Times

"Nelson's latest play has made the audience into flies-on-the-wall...Performances were excellent, although I found Magaro’s Joe Papp attractive but too mild-mannered...More aggressiveness in Magaro’s performance might have heightened the overall presentation...Although not as theatrical as I would have preferred, the show is enticing to anyone who would enjoy knowing more about Papp and his early contributions to New York City theater." Full Review

90
Epoch Times

"Herzog has so subtly built the play—and director Anne Kauffman has so skillfully echoed the playwright’s desires—that one doesn’t see the conclusion coming. The performance was remarkably moving. At the end, there was a brief, silent pause. Then the audience broke into unusually strong applause. Performances are excellent. Carrie Coon easily carries the play, with strong support by all the cast...A remarkable theatrical achievement." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"The task of conveying the atmosphere of the islands as well as portraying several of its inhabitants and setting out their personal stories falls to one remarkable actor, Brendan Conroy...Conroy snatches one’s attention with his unique delivery; he almost devours each word, savoring the text as if it were a tasty feast...He gets to know some of the inhabitants and gains their trust. And with that trust comes an opening up of their hearts and souls. And stories pour out." Full Review

75
Epoch Times

"'The Lucky One' does not disappoint...Sets by Vicki R. Davis and costumes by Martha Hally lend a particularly effective note. An elegant pair of opposing staircases gives performers the occasional opportunity to play scenes at varied physical levels...Under Jesse Marchese’s direction, the company is uniformly fine, with excellent ensemble playing, generally to be expected in Mint productions." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"Director Moritz von Stuelpnagel’s hilarious production. Few performers can appealingly merge clumsiness and grace—Kline exhibits a cross between the body language of a Charlie Chaplin and the wit, say, of a Rex Harrison...The supporting company...gives top-drawer support to the egomaniacal yet often melancholic man who has everything, yet never ceases complaining about his plight of plenty...Make a point of getting a ticket." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"The acting company is outstanding, with six actors of the company performing in both plays. As I saw both shows in one day, it was fascinating to see the differences in characterizations performed by Mac Rae, Patterson, Elless, Vickers, Cariani, and Jennifer Piech...In general, the performances might be adjudged as a bit 'over-the-top'...I suspect what might be called 'stylization' was the choice of director Cummings, and for me, this was a pleasure." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"The team of four players does impressive work, under the perceptive direction of Terry Kinney. Ruffalo’s Victor clearly expresses the disappointment of a man who feels he’s been cheated. Shalhoub’s outer bluff conceals the shame of a man who has perhaps finally admitted he took advantage of a situation...The play may not be as clear-cut as Miller’s other works...But 'The Price' is imbued with richness and humanity." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"Offers something just about everyone can identify with...The remarkable and satisfying point about Levenson’s play is that it offers to the greatest extent possible all sides of the arguments, both political and personal...The entire cast is superior. We see a remarkably smooth and integrated ensemble; they actually seem like a real family...Even after two-and-a-half hours, the interest never flags. There’s a lot going on in Levenson’s engrossing play." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"Things hilariously go over the top…It is John Keating’s show. He imparts almost a saintliness to the character of Pigeon…Playwright Sexton has performed a service in writing a play that offers high—or low—comedy on the one hand, and at the same time hints at a more serious matter." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"Direction by Foote veteran Michael Wilson hits all the right notes, gently but surely. Hallie Foote appears to have made a career out of portraying her father’s characters, playing the younger roles when a younger actress. Unquestionably, she has done her father proud. Devon Abner, works in sync with her, making a most effective husband-and-wife team in life and in art. Broadway veteran Harriet Harris makes the most of Vonnie, infusing the role with verve and passion." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"Karam's adaptation encompasses the elements of Chekhov’s play in all its complexity and richness...Overall, the acting is fine, although, in my opinion, Lane’s Ranevskaya is too modern and lightweight in quality. She has some nice scenes, however...The party scenes are nothing short of fabulous, with their liveliness and colorful execution balancing the somber content of the play...Kudos to playwright Karam, director Godwin, and to the Roundabout for making this production possible." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"There is some slow going in early scenes, but remember, this is a three-act play. Once the characters’ needs and frustrations are presented, the play, in gifted director Austin Pendleton’s hands, moves along vibrantly...Performances are excellent, with particular subtlety and detail demonstrated by Katie Firth and Julian Elfer...'A Day by the Sea' is a rich and thoughtful production, with a warm and universally meaningful text." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

“An interesting point is made regarding art...A cartoon can have only one interpretation. Thus a cartoon has a directness about it and may even create problems for the cartoonist...Alex Draper’s Bela is outstanding. And under Richard Romagnoli’s direction, performances are strong throughout, with the tension inherent in this fascinating play unrelenting.” Full Review

85
Epoch Times

“I found the play to be as timely as today’s headlines and thoroughly engrossing...Director Tony Speciale has paced the show tightly and swiftly, and performances are first-rate, with Jocelyn Kuritsky’s dogged intensity fueling the fire...An admirable play on an important topic. It deserves a longer life span than the current limited production at Abingdon Theatre Company." Full Review

65
Epoch Times

"Director Doyle is noted for his minimalist productions...However, in the case of this production, more might have been more. I missed the section, deleted here, of Anitra the beautiful Arabian woman and her seductive dance; nor does Solveig sing her song...Performances are fine, with an outstanding contribution by the energetic and athletic Gabriel Ebert." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"An evening of flat-out hilarity...With all elements under Morgan Gould’s direction, Katie Spelman’s choreography and Sariva Goetz’s music direction and vocal arrangements add to the overall excellence of this production...The play, which on one hand is a comedic romp, also offers food for thought on a variety of important topics. 'How will this fadge?' as one of Shakespeare’s heroines once questioned. So see the play. I highly recommend it." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"Cariou is able to project informality and intimacy...He also intersperses the selections with entertaining and informative chat on his experiences…Cariou travels easily from speech to song and back again. His singing pipes are no longer those of the man he once was, but his technique is such that he always comes through...For lovers of words and songs, 'Broadway and the Bard' is altogether a delightful way to spend an evening in the presence of an artful, seasoned performer." Full Review

70
Epoch Times

"There is a wild scene involving audience participation, when certain audience members are brought onstage as the cast gapes...Under Andrei Belgrader’s direction, performances are fine." Full Review

95
Epoch Times

"Director Elise Thoron has done a remarkable job on 'ToasT'. Performances are so exceptional and the ensemble so smooth that it is difficult to pick out one actor over the other. The language of the play mixes down-to-earth street talk with poetry. Lemon Andersen’s work is a tremendous contribution to the theatrical literary experience." Full Review

95
Epoch Times

for a previous production "Loneliness and tenderness suffuse 'The Weir.' Ultimately, it is a play about relationships and the human need for contact. One can’t expect much more than that from a theatrical experience. Under astute direction, the cast members project this rich mix of Irish and universal characters that stay with one long after the show has ended." Full Review