Diana Mott

Diana Mott is a critic with ZEALnyc. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (11)
75
ZEALnyc

"Just relax and enjoy the rhmying couplets and be prepared to laugh a great deal...The entire cast is game...'The Metromaniacs' is ultimately a delightful diversion, a piece of fluff that entertains but doesn’t resonate. Nonetheless, kudos to director Michael Khan who keeps four plates spinning at one time. The highest praise goes to Mr. Ives, who may have had great source material, but his words are what make this funny little play sing." Full Review

70
ZEALnyc

"We are solidly in A.R. Gurney territory: waspy, and well-heeled...Secondary characters are inhabited with brio and wit by Jodie Markell and Liam Craig, even if some of them as written are a bit dog-eared and thematic: the computer geek, the newly transplanted couple from the South, the prematurely retired Brandeis professor who channels his philosophical disquiet into an effort to quit smoking, the retired couple who can’t agree on their retirement." Full Review

80
ZEALnyc

“This production, deftly directed by Evans, is a good introduction to theater in general, and Shakespeare in particular...In spite of the language, the action of the play is easy to follow and the performances are solid...The gravity and insanity of the first half of ‘The Winter’s Tale’ can seem out of balance with the levity of the second half. But then the ultimate renewal takes place in the form of a resurrection that makes all that can be made right again.” Full Review

85
ZEALnyc

"'Angel:' On a stage bare of anything save a wooden barrel, Lvova’s solo performance brings Rehana and all of the secondary characters to vivid life under the steady hand of director Michael Cabot...'Echoes:' Both narratives alternate seamlessly to tell parallel stories of their gradual disillusionment and horror, caused by the men and the ideas they had hoped would save them...The nuanced performances of both actresses bridge all the gaps and make us care." Full Review

95
ZEALnyc

"In Andrew Upton’s capable hands, the dialogue is witty and modern and becomes the vehicle for a thrilling ride between tragedy and comedy...Blanchett is dazzling and Roxburgh is a rake times ten...But, they are truly part of an ensemble and allow the rest of the cast to breathe life into their characters as well...Credit for the seamlessness of this wonderful production must also be given to John Crowley, who directed it at the STC and here." Full Review

75
ZEALnyc

"Euripides wrote 'The Trojan Women' two millennia ago, and its relevance still astounds…The choreography feels distracting at times and the ensemble’s youthful energy can work against the somber themes of this very old story, but there are powerful performances…Euripides wrote his little anti-war play two thousand years ago and it is still powerful, an age-old story that we never seem to learn from." Full Review

75
ZEALnyc

"Brings new life to a story that takes place in a cloistered environment yet has universal appeal...Ridloff’s passionate performance transcends spoken language. The weakness of the play may be the secondary characters who sometimes feel like superficial foils created to provide friction...The complex issues between the hearing and non-hearing world still exist and, as this revival vividly conveys, the need to be heard in one’s own voice remains powerful and relevant." Full Review

80
ZEALnyc

"Delivered with wry self-awareness and brutal humor...A raw, deeply personal and powerful account of how Ensler found her connection to the body of the world...She can be strident and brutal and confrontational. But she is also funny and self-deprecating...Paulus keeps the pace lively and provides a forward movement to Ensler's monologue, preventing it from becoming a TED Talk...The play is at its very best when it exists in her real world instead of the metaphorical one." Full Review

85
ZEALnyc

"Her story reveals the insatiability of human need and the lengths people will go to feel better...By placidly recounting gruesome events, she makes the audience uneasy and a bit queasy. Sharon purrs and coddles us while conveying dark secrets and some startling truths with equal parts humor, sex appeal, and downright creepiness...So effective, I left the theater feeling somewhat off-balance myself, and not a little squeamish.” Full Review

80
ZEALnyc

"Patricia and Nick become inextricably entangled in this subtle, psychologically complex exploration of the artist’s relationship to his art, to his personal life, to what it means to be a son, and to what it means to be Jewish in America...The razor-sharp dialogue keeps the audience raptly attentive...The actors are all fine, especially Nagrant...But the star of this show is Margulies, who has made a timeless work that still enchants while making its audience sit up and pay attention." Full Review

20
ZEALnyc

"I would like to say that I was enthralled by the subtle, changing dynamics of captor and prey, as Miranda and Frederick verbally spar with each other during this 145-minute drama. But the performances of this Frederick and Miranda, played by Matt de Rogatis and Jillian Geurts, lacked the nuance that would make this play sing...I felt nothing. Except perhaps the need to escape myself." Full Review