Dominic Cavendish

Dominic Cavendish is a critic with The Telegraph (UK). This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

If you are this critic, please see the instructions on how to add reviews, update your profile, or make changes to your excerpts and scores.

Reviews (197)
The Telegraph (UK)

"The evening builds an accumulating and harrowing sense of crushing internal logic and group-think." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"In a sense, it endorses the line that the truth will out. Yet what’s impressive is that it also encapsulates the protracted difficulty, at a personal and political level, of trying to heal the deepest scars." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"Those coming to terms with the end of an era, and seeking some means to express their devotion too, should queue round the block to see this." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"It demands attention, especially now, as we contend with a mighty economic shock and all-change at the top." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"It’s of a piece with a production that unpacks Shakespeare’s strange cargo without much care for precedent, and subjects it to fresh inspection." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"There’s something mindlessly uplifting about seeing hordes of nuns kicking off the restrained habits of a lifetime and going for it with Travolta-esque moves and grooves. The joy is preordained but it’s joy all the same." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"Is it perfect? No, but it’s very serviceable in a bijou hotel kind of way – and there’ll be another one along, anytime soon; it’s a conveyor-belt classic." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"Roy Williams's [play] dares to hold a mirror up to prejudice within the black community, but the drama doesn't entirely gel ... Watchable, certainly – but missable, regrettably, too." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

Somehow the evening ... dwindles into a case of “so-what?”. Oddly, it satisfies most when at its most conventional. It feels too self-involved and woolly to hit home hard. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

Tony! begins promisingly, moves into a disappointing phase and then outstays its welcome. Tonally, it’s semi-successful ... but it couldn’t hurt for the creative team, including director Peter Rowe, to have a confab back at the drawing board. Full Review

Britannicus (London)
Hammersmith
The Telegraph (UK)

This assured revival at the Lyric Hammersmith is the mother of all psycho-dramas. Some of the minimalist touches ... are inspired. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

for a previous production It’s a bold pair of actors who step into these roles ... [but] there’s a curious restraint in their performances. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

This is a fascinating, important evening, with valuably shaming moments of British imperial brutality ... Yet overall, it has the feel more of a useful dossier than an edge-of-your-seat drama Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

The romantic “plot” ... is scoffably slight. Yet ... the show has secured its staying power. Compared with John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, alas, the tingle-factor of pure chemistry is lacking. The evening succeeds because it abounds with infectious, unfaked delight. Full Review

Middle (London)
Waterloo
The Telegraph (UK)

While 'Middle' .... has the same interest in concentrated emotional interaction [as 'Beginning'], it didn’t resonate quite as deeply. Director Polly Findlay elicits finely calibrated performances. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

Together, this exemplary ensemble give us a breath-taking portrait of backwater England that roves from the profane to the sublime, a crucial theatrical rite, fit for the ages. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

I can’t see anything other than A*s being bestowed on Walker’s unmissable performance...School-days may or may not be the best days of our lives; what this riveting evening brings home is how crucial they invariably are. Full Review

The 47th (London)
Southwark
The Telegraph (UK)

Goold brings his usual sheen to proceedings, played out under an oval-ish strip of light, yet can’t hide the lack of meaningful substance beneath the theatrical polish. See it for Carvel’s tour de force, perhaps, but as Trump would attest, you can’t win ’em all. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

It’s all hermetically contained, the fundamental question, “Why should we care?”, never adequately answered...There’s committed and commendable work from the actors, though. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

Indeed more would be welcome, full-stop - without interval, the running time only stands at just over two hours, another half hour would be fine; Hare has alighted on a topic of monumental fascination. Call me crazy but Netflix should snap it up. Full Review

Our Generation
Waterloo
The Telegraph (UK)

This is the latest from verbatim theatre queen Alecky Blythe...When the acting is as good as it is here the result is a thrilling suspension of disbelief; we’re aware of the artifice but also experience it as authentic. Full Review

The Collaboration
Southwark
The Telegraph (UK)

It’s refreshing to eavesdrop on the notoriously understated icon in relatively garrulous private mode...the casual detail and commitment of the central performances keeps you watching. Full Review

A Number (Old Vic)
Southwark
The Telegraph (UK)

This production offers something of a fresh slant, but still winds up feeling ... surplus to requirements. Churchill’s sparse text carries a phenomenal charge of self-centred parenting, insinuated abuse, and resultant resentment ... That doesn’t carry across here. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

The 90 minute affair ends with much-loved footage of the star dancing in The Barefoot Contessa (1954), seductive moves from yesteryear that McGovern poignantly mimics. A shame the rest of the evening plods. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

The whole experience is awash with sure-footed dance: sensuous, fleet and duly delivering those signature can-can moves in a riot of petticoat lifting and high-kicking. Yet there’s little disguising the slender narrative arc... Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"The evening moves from primary colour, almost crayon-crude, mirth in the first half to something more subtly, and emotionally, shaded in the second, the dramatic stakes for those involved don’t carry quite the requisite heft." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"So, the script needs edits, and the scenario surely demands more characters." Full Review

Antigone (London)
Fitzrovia
The Telegraph (UK)

"Though there’s a visually incandescent climax, it’s not (yet) fully moving, and there’s way too much faff at the start." Full Review

The Trials (London)
Seven Dials
The Telegraph (UK)

"The drama towards a classroom discussion robs the target younger audience, as well as those of us who are older of much adrenal urgency. Great idea, I would say, but another draft would be welcome." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"That halfway house aside, the show deserves full ones. The West End may be spoilt for choice with family treats, but this is British theatrical verve at full pelt." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"I found the evening too hermetic and protracted. ... The social context feels cursory, whether that’s the local community or the wider, then inescapable, presence of the Thatcherite project. More voices in the mix, and a brisker pace, could turn a laudable effort into an exemplary one." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"In so far as they go, constrained by a directorial conceit so sparing it’s distractingly ostentatious, I can’t fault the cast, but they yield little that couldn’t be obtained in more traditional, pleasure-giving Chekhov." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

The dark comedy draws you in, but hits the snag of leaving you a bit high and dry when you yourself are required to care. The evening makes valid points about how hard the family straitjacket can be to escape. But the elaboration of resentments has a pre-fab quality. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

The beauty of Hnath’s account, which was seen on Broadway in 2017, is that it honours the validity and modernity of Nora’s desertion. Noma Dumezweni is magnificent. Essential viewing. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

for a previous production "Coming after Covid, it’s hugely, tear-stirringly cathartic. Beresford won a Bafta for the screenplay of Pride. He can pride himself on this. My play of the year so far." Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

I loved [Amy Adams'] performance. It’s clear, simple, believable, and quietly heart-breaking. Hats off to Adams for taking a leap in the dark for the summer season. Still, it’s not quite the stuff of fairy tales. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

Bowman ... not only possesses a terrific set of lungs, but denotes the character’s journey of self-discovery with nuance, shifting from initial hurt and bashfulness to indestructible resolve. I would have loved more of is memorable songs. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

There are elements of this production that feel underpowered. Michael Yeargan’s eye-catching picture-book design has its snags. I wasn’t persuaded that Stephen K Amos as Eliza’s feckless pa was at home at a knees-up. [But Amara] Okereke flowers into magnificence. Full Review

Oklahoma! (London)
Southwark
The Telegraph (UK)

There’s sterling work across the board, with notables including Stavros Demetraki as the comically lecherous ... Ali Hakim ... and recent Olivier-winner Liza Sadovy as ... Aunt Eller. “Oklahoma, OK” runs that line in the famous title song. OK? Better than that. KO, knock-out. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

Defined by its attention to detail, it balances directorial innovation with actorly inspiration. Some of the ‘business’ drags ... though the organised chaos of the incompetent night watchmen in the second half is a joy. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

West End debuts don’t come much more astonishing than this solo tour de force by Jodie Comer...But in the face of Comer’s triumphant leap into the live acting arena, I was mainly left wanting to see her on stage more; she’s in her element, and can work wonders. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

[It] has some good ideas, but lacks the surprise of their greatest work. For every ‘through the wardrobe’ moment of wonder I experienced there were times when I felt as if I was banging my head against a brick wall. The huge redeeming feature lay in the closing sections. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

...the piece cuts fairly quick to the pain of paternal absence – and gnawing self-doubt – that afflicts our hero, showing how his artistry is rooted in trauma that can’t be assuaged...My heart never quite belonged to it, but the performances are genuinely sparkling. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

This utterly riveting and revelatory staging of one of the best-known, but also most dustily familiar, of 20th-century American literary classics...Sorkin’s account argues the case for the core complexity of To Kill a Mockingbird as never before. Full Review

Cock (London)
West End
The Telegraph (UK)

Terrific at conveying hurt, yearning and simmering self-doubt, Egerton now stars in Marianne Elliott’s revival of Mike Bartlett’s 2009 play Cock, a piece smartly and tragicomically about ongoing confusions of sexuality, the suffocating restrictions of categorisation and the agonies of the heart. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

Henry V is immensely mutable: it’s not only what it has to tell us, it’s what it has been made to say over the years that’s striking...Not an all-out triumph but a victory nonetheless. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

The atmosphere is more gooey than gritty ... As satisfying as the book? No. The best staging ever? Surely not. Yet it’s an invitation to let our imagination roam free together: that feels invaluable right now. Full Review

The Glow
Sloane Square
The Telegraph (UK)

It’s hard to encapsulate his time-bendy head-scratcher, but think of the obsession in The Da Vinci Code with Mary Magdalene and a Doctor Who box-set watched on fast-forward and you’re halfway there; in terms of its theatrical pedigree, you can spot comparisons with JB Priestley and Thornton Wilder. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

for a previous production With a versatile cast ... the piece makes shrewd points about old-world chauvinism. Shout-outs should go to director Donnacadh O’Briain, and to Gabriel Chernick, on keys and presiding over the small band. Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

Running to just 100 minutes – it’s designed for schools, but open to all comers - Nicky Allpress’s multi-racial production could be hideously gimmicky, but it has a refreshing cheek and an energetic, cheery coherence. Full Review