Fergus Morgan

Fergus Morgan is a critic with The Reviews Hub. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

If you are this critic, please see the instructions on how to add reviews, update your profile, or make changes to your excerpts and scores.

Reviews (9)
40
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production “It's a great performance, undoubtedly. But there's nothing here to hold the audience's attention, no journey for them to go on, no jeopardy, no risk, no reward. The meticulous research behind it is evident, Nashman's Kafka is rich and detailed, and Cassidy's production is thoroughly polished, but ‘Kafka and Son’ has one crippling, fundamental flaw: it's dramatically dry as a bone. It's resolutely, unyieldingly, purgatorially dull.” Full Review

80
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Byrne’s quietly stunning 'Secret Life of Humans' reaches for answers with kaleidoscopic elegance...It pitches a contemporary story against an older one, against the oldest story of all...New Diorama’s staging unfolds with metronomic precision, shifting from the present to the past with sly stage magic...This is bold, beautiful, utterly absorbing theatre, asking deafening questions about society, and finding the thrilling drama inherent in the human story. It takes your breath away." Full Review

85
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Alex Byrne’s production, staged transversely, offers up just enough detail to ignite the audience’s imagination...As the performers (Martin Bonger, Carly Davis, TJ Holmes, Sara Lessore and Amalia Vitale) skilfully interleave narration, Gallic-infused song and witty audience interaction, they strike a delicate tonal balance between the traditional and the everyday, the fearsome and the fun. It’s a healthy, happy mix, which keeps kids engaged and adults entertained." Full Review

40
A Younger Theatre

for a previous production "Championing innovation like this has its price. '946' is tonally inconsistent, particularly in the first half, and for a show about World War II, strikingly emotionally dry. This is partly the fault of an uneven cast, but it’s also the direct consequence of Kneehigh’s unwaveringly swashbuckling approach...Although it’s refreshing to see so many under-12s flocking the yard, one imagines their appreciation of Morpurgo’s finer emotional lessons might be lost amongst all Rice’s noise." Full Review

80
The Reviews Hub

for a previous production "It is, first and foremost, a captivating story expertly told by Joseph...He talks to the audience as to an interested stranger, all flashing smiles and half-mocking boasts. But shining through this winning exterior is a grit and an emotional depth that comes to the fore...It is testament to Joseph’s versatility that he manages to cram a host of idiosyncratic supporting characters...'Sancho' is undoubtedly more than an entertaining tale...The piece has an undoubted contemporary relevance." Full Review

80
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Deftly interweaving these two monologues, Naylor asks pertinent questions about the power of art, the responsibility of the artist, and the integrity of a society that only cares about refugees when Angelina Jolie tells it to...Their slowly converging stories are both compelling and convincingly rooted in gritty geopolitics...At times, one wishes he would take more formal risks...This is a form that has limits. And 'Borders' – excellent though it is – doesn’t push them very far." Full Review

40
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Stuff happens. An old friend dies. Sara gets drunk. Hester plays the cello. Revelations spill out. But it always feels as if these are excuses for Mills to philosophise uninspiringly about death, about music, and about legacy. There’s never a palpable sense of drama or jeopardy, just a long, meandering, morbid conversation strung out over 90 minutes...The whole thing ends up an unconcluded muddle, grasping for a trite kookiness that never materialises." Full Review

45
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production “Brims with urgency and anger but fails to find any lasting articulacy…There are numerous frustrating obstacles to overcome before one can begin to appreciate ‘Burning Doors,’ rapid surtitles,...dissonant tonal shifts, and impenetrable streams of garbled pop psychology among them. Underneath all that, there are glimpses of authentic comment on the ethics, obligations, and taboos surrounding...protest and unjust political imprisonment. But you have to really dig to find them.” Full Review

70
The Reviews Hub

for a previous production "Rhode’s direction is captivatingly methodical...The majority of the second half feels tonally lost....'Toast' is noticeably underdeveloped, especially when compared to Bean’s recent successes, but it is nonetheless a captivatingly frank portrait of working class life in 1970s Yorkshire. Rhode’s production has its flaws but also boasts a set of fine performances and shines a fascinating light on the early work of a prominent playwright." Full Review