Gabe Cohn

Gabe Cohn is a critic with Exeunt Magazine. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (12)
This Flat Earth
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"It’s an original way into a difficult subject...I think the larger reason why the play feels off is because the questions it asks through Julie — and the suggestion that adults and those in positions of power have not done more to prevent school shootings as a result of desensitization or inaction — feels inadequate at a time when the level of passion surrounding the issue on both sides has never been clearer." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"The hyper-contemporary Trumpian veneer that’s been slathered over this production...does end up amplifying fleeting moments of close connection to our present day, but it does so at the expense of the play’s larger message...Beneath the cheap glow of the production’s heavy-handed Trump paint job is a superb cast...The nuance of the source material is too often sacrificed in the name of lightweight satire, cheapening the first half and muddying the message of the second. " Full Review

The Light Years
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"These dual time periods create interesting opportunities for both performance and design...The difference, brought out all the more by Cash playing both wives, is fascinating to watch. Two distinct kinds of affection are on display here...The set and costumes take advantage of the time period jumps, too...Overall, the design shines...Even with such a great sense of time period, deep connections form between these worlds and our own." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"The narrative comes through clearly, thanks to Evans’s staging...There is nary a moment in the whole show where the heat of competition doesn’t burn palpably...The problem with the play—and it’s a big one—is that the two women never talk about anything beyond their boyfriends…While the male characters are made out to be the assholes, it’s the female ones who get it worst by not being defined at all...It’s a shame that Kate and Leslie are never allowed onto the court themselves." Full Review

DIVA (FringeNYC)
East Village
Time Out New York

"'Diva' is sometimes as messy as the lipstick-smeared mouth of June’s bottle of Absolut: At the show I attended, technical issues were numerous enough to be distracting, and June’s sense of herself as trapped bleeds into the show as a lack of forward momentum. Still, this old has-been proves surprisingly relatable as she proudly recounts a life lived on her own terms. It seems a shame that June’s alone. She’s enjoyable company." Full Review

Time Out New York

“Although Stuart’s performance is charming and warm, West can only be enigmatic for so long before we begin to wonder about his own story—which, frustratingly, we never learn. Some of what he says offers hints at the man behind the voice. In the end, though, one can’t help wishing that West would put down the microphone for a second and talk with us, or anyone, face to face.” Full Review

Shooter
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"'Shooter' distinguishes itself by being concerned less with guns and more with the people...The play splits itself three ways...Jim's time in the gun course, Jim's relationship to his childhood friends, and Jim's reckoning with what he's done...The play is at its strongest when it concerns itself with the first of these thread...I found myself yearning for a non-male perspective onstage...Limiting the number of perspectives constrains the play...Still, 'Shooter' makes a lot of smart choices." Full Review

Rotterdam
Midtown E
Exeunt Magazine

“One of Brittain’s greatest strengths as a playwright is his control of information delivery…‘Rotterdam’ also explores the ways in which relationships — romantic, platonic, and familial — connect us. This is done as much through Donnacadh O’Briain’s direction and Ellan Parry’s set design as it is through text…‘Rotterdam’ isn’t trying to show a universal experience, because there isn’t one. And that’s a key lesson as well: that by rejecting universality, 'Rotterdam' gets that much closer to it.” Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"This is the kind of ensemble that doesn’t need to be dissected: universally superb, it’s a cast full of clearly well-seasoned Wilson players, one through which the rhythmic nature of Wilson's language pulses freely. And like improvised jazz, the play never gets overly structured, giving each major character a chance to take a solo..."Despite the supremely difficult truths that the play illustrates...it is entirely built on an unwavering compassion for the beauty in its characters." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

“A lean and spare—but remarkably well-crafted—version of Shakespeare’s tragedy, with performances tailored to work with the production’s quickened pace. Iwuji delivers a stellar, complex Hamlet...The rest of the ensemble is uniformly superb…McGregor’s direction plays into this modern-day morality. While the production is filled throughout with choices that resonate with the racial landscape in America, the clearest and boldest choice comes in the play’s final moments.” Full Review

The Box Show
Gramercy
Time Out New York

for a previous production "In Salerno's intensely creative collective of vignettes, she crams herself into a cupboard-like cube for 90 minutes...and she keeps surprising you with what she can produce in the space…It’s often hilarious, but what makes the show most memorable are its moments of darkness, expressed in fleeting, poignant side thoughts and comments. This interplay between light and dark helps 'The Box Show' achieve what every vignette show wants: It is even greater than the sum of its parts." Full Review

Strange Country
Soho/Tribeca
Exeunt Magazine

"The play challenges every first impression that it gives us...The play doesn’t have a large amount of plot, preferring character development over plot development. The trio of actors take us through these transformations beautifully...The play itself creates slight issues when it comes to its characters’ motives...Where 'Strange Country' is most successful is in its refusal to offer black and white moral answers to any of the challenges that its characters face." Full Review