Holly Williams

Holly Williams is a critic with The Independent (UK). This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (31)
SIX
Kingston
Time Out London

I suspect ‘Six’ will be a big hit. But if this is the future of feminism, lop my head off now. Full Review

Time Out London

...a baffling, counter-intuitive take on Shakespeare’s problematic comedy...lacks basic clarity: the narrative doesn’t come across crisply, and the heavy doubling doesn’t help matters.' Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Stef Smith’s smart three-Nora Ibsen update spans 100 years and cleverly contrasting worlds of pain in this slick first revival.' Full Review

A Kind of People
Sloane Square
Time Out London

Button-pushing new drama about race and class...the performances in Michael Buffong’s production mostly imbue the play with a natural, relatable air, even if some dialogue feels pretty on the nose.' Full Review

Two Ladies
Southwark
Time Out London

The idea of dramatising such women... is fruitful. But if the first half is a static, talky piece, Harris’s play takes some unearned and unconvincing swerves that ultimately feel faintly ridiculous.' Full Review

Time Out London

I wondered if [Dominic Hill] was trying a bit hard not to give in to the surroundings’ potential for twee charm. There is darkness to be mined in the play, in its gender politics and in the fairy pranks. Both are brought out here. Full Review

Bitter Wheat
Charing Cross
Time Out London

Its first half is broadly what you might expect, and kind of okay if you’re willing to overlook the relentlessly male viewpoint and total lack of subtlety...But the extremely brief and sketchy second half is just bizarre. Full Review

Time Out London

Anne-Louise Sarks’s production doesn’t fully convince that theatre is the best medium for this story...Still, an hour-and-a-half in Peake’s company is never going to be time wasted, and she’s predictably brilliant.' Full Review

Sitting
Dalston
Time Out London

There’s some nicely observed writing here, and perhaps unsurprisingly given Parkinson’s comedic acting chops, it’s also funny in places. But the actors are rather hampered by a tricky structural choice...' Full Review

After Edward
Bankside
Time Out London

It can smack a wee bit of self-satisfied student drama, but if the intertextual cleverness is laid on with a trowel, it also delivers silliness in spades. Full Review

Dust
East Village
Time Out London

for a previous production ★★★ "A woman wakes up in a grim afterlife in Milly Thomas's sardonic Edinburgh smash." Full Review

Network (London)
Waterloo
The Independent (UK)

“Hall sticks close to the film, pruning subplots but retaining famous speeches, delivered with superb, focused charisma by Cranston...A magnetic yet weighty performance...van Hove’s screen-filled production is frenetic – but within it, Cranston finds stillness...Even with a performance as mighty as Cranston’s, our attention is constantly drawn to the blown-up, artificial image rather than the man standing before us...This tactic...can detract as is distracts, but here it seems apposite." Full Review

What's On Stage (UK)

for a previous production "As a piece of theatre, well, it isn't live and it isn't communal – but it is effective. Think of it more like reading a comic book, but with an aural, acted soundtrack rather than speech bubbles...It's a story that needs to be heard, a journey that we need to go on with Aryan and Kabir...In matching an almost twee craft with an account of the horrendous, inhumane treatment of two very young men, 'Flight' makes the story feel newly fresh. It's miniature, yet also epic." Full Review

What's On Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Kitson's dialogue combines gorgeous turns of phrase, daft comedy riffs, and more profound digs into human psyche...Kitson has won a huge following for tucking a comedian's laugh-rate inside moving stories of human frailty, served through some fiendish technical conceit or formal invention. 'Mouse' delivers on all three, a well-sprung trap of a show that draws you in and snaps shut in a hugely satisfying fashion." Full Review

The Independent (UK)

for a previous production "There’s rich dramatic potential in the Detroit label’s history. Instead, we get a squished potted-history using Gordy’s own dismal, stiff dialogue...Still, the band is tight, the top notes hit, the large ensemble have buckets of sass and groove, and audiences inevitably approach these much-loved songs with a sizeable portion goodwill...But 'Motown, the Musical' shines far less brightly, lacking smarts as well as soul." Full Review

The Independent (UK)

for a previous production "Jonathan Munby’s clear-headed production of 'The Merchant of Venice' treads a fine line between solid and sparkling: there’s no flashy concept, but there are flashes of directorial insight...The casket scenes are also inflated to the maximum cartoon caricature, with dim-witted suitors mincing and sword-waving about the stage; hilarious or tedious depending on your sense of humour...But Munby knows how to balance the comedy with tragedy." Full Review

Time Out London

‘Operation Mincemeat’ ... is itself slicker than it wants to appear, and clearly well-drilled. This really is an ensemble show, and SpitLip prove a winning one. Their style may not be for everyone, but you’d have to have a very stiff upper lip indeed for it not to break into laughter. Full Review

On Blueberry Hill
Westminster
Time Out London

Watching two characters never actually interact rarely feels terribly theatrical; ‘On Blueberry Hill’ could be a radio play, or a novella. The story moves, but it doesn’t always grab. Full Review

Kunene and the King
Covent Garden
Time Out London

But even if ‘Kunene and the King’ is predictable in its shape and story arc, and feels a mite old-fashioned, it’s a good-hearted 90 minutes. Full Review

Time Out London

A brash, flashy staging of the '80s musical about starstruck teens...a slick, suitably energetic production.' Full Review

Fleabag
Covent Garden
The Independent (UK)

Still, Waller-Bridge impressively manages to make matters feel remarkably intimate and conspiratorial, drawing you in with those judgemental eyebrow swoops and wicked grins. Full Review

Rust
Shepherds Bush
Time Out London

Emson’s dialogue remains mostly in a cheeky, flirty register, and Eleanor Rhode’s production convinces on the sexual attraction front...Line by line, Emson’s writing is fresh, but neither the story nor the form does anything new.' Full Review

The Independent (UK)

Death of a Salesman is a cast-iron classic, and this is a very solidly wrought production – not startlingly revelatory, but given an extra sheen thanks to the casting of a black central family.' Full Review

Time Out London

for a previous production This plot-free revue based on the songs of Fats Waller is fun but thin...As it stands, it’s a treat for Fats Waller fans, but unlikely to set the casual musical theatre goer’s world alight.' Full Review

Mouthpiece
Soho
Time Out London

Basically, ‘Mouthpiece’ is a dream for the theatre nerd: it’s got heart, smarts, and something necessary and critical to say about both the artform itself and the unfairly unequal society we live in.' Full Review

Emilia
Barbican
Time Out London

She eyeballs us ferociously in an incendiary final speech, in which women are encouraged to embrace the flame of anger inside them. The room ignites, and complaints about structure or character development go up in smoke. Full Review

Titus Andronicus
Barbican
Time Out London

Blanche McIntyre directs a wickedly entertaining version of Shakespeare's murderous tragedy Full Review

Glengarry Glen Ross
Westminster
The Independent (UK)

Even if it an efficacious modern classic, I’m not sure we really need to see more casually cruel, casually racist, shamelessly venal macho men strut and fret their hour-forty-five upon the stage right now. Full Review

What's On Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Largely a feel-good, all-ages tale told with Kneehigh's customary agility and flair...Owen is astonishingly good...The action is presented with wit and verve...Although '946' has a fabulously footloose, skipping energy, it's a shame its story structure follows suit. Most of the narrative simply hops from minor event to minor event, and too much of it feels bitty and insubstantial...It takes a good while for the story to hit its beats. When it does, there's much to enjoy." Full Review

Sunset Boulevard
Midtown W
What's On Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Close gives a performance that shades and shimmers like one of sequined gowns: grandly majestic...But while there's a wild-eyed creepiness here, it would also be impossible to remain unmoved by the tragedy of her grand delusions. Close is unafraid to be vulnerable; that carries, even in such a large venue..The big number, ‘With One Look,’ which winds through Lloyd Webber's persuasive, evocative score, is as insistent and irresistible as ever." Full Review

Ross & Rachel
Midtown E
The Independent (UK)

for a previous production "'Ross & Rachel' is almost too cynical…Where Fritz’s play really excels, however, is in simultaneously probing the myth-making we engage in in our personal relationships, and the myth-making pop culture romance peddle...How sit-com clichés come to define real love-lives. 'Ross & Rachel' takes a fictional couple, and makes them look like a real couple that’s spent too much time watching fictional couples. Which is something we can all recognize." Full Review