Jacob Gallagher-Ross

Jacob Gallagher-Ross is a critic with Village Voice. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (16)
Village Voice

"My reservations about Benedict Andrews's slick, vacuous production began with the set...The gleaming cube serves as a lavish but empty display case for a couple of rampant star performances...This production transpires in a vacuum, the play's markers of place and time ignored or misapplied...The production does have its rewards. Anderson's Blanche, aflutter with roiling tension, sighs her lines in singsong Southern cadences…Like Blanche herself, the production overstays its welcome." Full Review

Antlia Pneumatica
Midtown W
Village Voice

"A typically elegant production by Ken Rus Schmoll…At first, Washburn seems to set the stage for wistful autumnal reminiscence, but she soon lights out for richer and stranger terrain…Amid such looming questions, Schmoll's production finds grace in the details…We're left retroactively wondering what was real and what was reverie, as that most basic of natural laws — the hard division between life and death — appears to dissolve." Full Review

The Wildness
Midtown W
Village Voice

"This into-the-woods-and-back tale is belted with passion and verve by a great group of singers...The performers make this the rare concert musical that sustains the energy of an actual concert...It's relentlessly affirmative and more than a little wide-eyed, and it substitutes enthusiasm for nuance. But judging by the young people in the audience clapping, dancing, and singing along, it's also the kind of buoying affirmation we all need to hear once in a while." Full Review

Village Voice

"A brutal parable for the season of Trump, director Ivo van Hove's pared-back production of Arthur Miller's 'A View From the Bridge' depicts the paranoid mindset of aggrieved patriarchy. It's a timely tragedy: a reminder of how easily wounded pride can mutate into xenophobic aggression...Ignoring conventional markers of space and time, van Hove concocts a steadily mounting pressure." Full Review

New York Animals
West Village
Village Voice

"It can be a fine line between archetype and stereotype, but Sater's characterizations tend to the latter while clearly intending the former...It's admirable that they avoided yoking everything to a contrived plot — but they also avoided drama more or less altogether...Sater and Bacharach paint a very monochromatic picture of a many-hued city...You'll probably see a more exotic sampling of Gotham on your walk back to the subway." Full Review

Village Voice

"The piece has its longeurs; the sibling backchat between sequences isn't nearly as enjoyable as the big production numbers it introduces. But throughout, yesterday's experiments and today's experimenters merrily coexist, reminding us that the quest for new forms is a venerable NYC tradition." Full Review

Fulfillment
Soho/Tribeca
Village Voice

"Bradshaw's modern-day Job story illustrates the covert racism endemic in elite circles: Instead of outright bigotry, there are inflated benchmarks, lip service paid to diversity, and toxic microaggressions. Racism hasn't impeded Michael, exactly — but when he starts floundering, it's the straw that breaks his back. So what's ultimately being fulfilled here? America's age-old habit of destroying the black body. As Ta-Nehisi Coates put it recently, it's a tradition." Full Review

Cagney
Midtown W
Village Voice

for a previous production "Watching 'Cagney', a new musical about the revered silver-screen hoodlum, is a bit like encountering a singing-and-dancing Wikipedia page. It's good-natured, informative, and seemingly comprehensive. But it might appeal most to confirmed Cagney-o-philes. While this production boasts plenty of old-school showmanship, it offers little memorable insight into Cagney's life or career...once Cagney runs out of movies, the production abruptly runs out of steam." Full Review

Village Voice

"An invigorating production…As Birch digs more deeply into the archaeology of gender, our civilization appears corrupted at the root. Her central question grows increasingly urgent: How can we imagine a new world free from the vestiges of ancient oppression?…For Birch every document of our civilization is a document of barbarity. If only we could start again. But with Birch's dauntless vision as exemplar, we can try — in our imaginations, at least." Full Review

Really
Lower E Side
Village Voice

"A trenchant new play in a gorgeous production by Richard Maxwell…Maxwell's direction matches form to content…The director's trademark understatement — the actors deliver their text with studied neutrality — heightens this photographic sense, the calm suggesting a throbbing undercurrent of feeling…With 'Really,' Drury and Maxwell's fertile collaboration turns the theater itself into the answer to photography's egotism. It is communitarian, not isolating; evanescent, not material." Full Review

O, Earth
Soho/Tribeca
Village Voice

"'O, Earth' is baggy, more like an exuberant first draft than a finished work...The play's urgent declamations of feeling can be mawkish and banal. But 'O, Earth' is also generous, ambitious, and fundamentally humane. The superabundance of expression redresses historical silence; the crowded stage answers effacement and repression. When ghosts from a harsher past plead that we must learn to love each other better, who can argue with that?" Full Review

Marjorie Prime
Midtown W
Village Voice

"Jordan Harrison's captivating new play...Emphasizing the transitory nature of true human perceptions, director Anne Kauffman's production limns eloquent compositions for fleeting intervals.... The excellent ensemble subtly delineates the differences between unthinking human movement and its machine-learned facsimile." Full Review

Henry IV
Brooklyn
Village Voice

"The historical personalities are obscure now, but the conflicts are not: fights for money, power, and respect. Given this pressure-cooker atmosphere, English director Phyllida Lloyd's decision to stage her radically slimmed-down 'Henry IV' in a women's prison makes sense...Call it Orange Is the New Bard. The play's brutal politics are at home there — one of the few surviving pockets of violent honor culture. And watching an all-female cast embody hormonal machismo exposes the dangerous peaco... Full Review

Fool For Love
Midtown W
Village Voice

"Despite its desert setting, the first Broadway staging of Sam Shepard's 'Fool for Love' doesn't give off much heat. And that's a problem, because the 1983 play about an incendiary forbidden passion depends on credible pyrotechnics between its tormented twosome... Aukin's production gets queasy whenever Shepard's text reaches outside realism's limits...Fools for realism, these lovers never make it outside the motel room and into the vast night beyond." Full Review

Mercury Fur
Midtown W
Village Voice

"A litany of tired shock tactics that manages the difficult trick of being simultaneously gory and boring...The big question hanging over the production is: To what purpose are we being scandalized...? Despite the play's moralism, Ridley is more like his main characters than he'd admit: staging prurient, pointless thrills for jaded urban appetites." Full Review

The Duchamp Syndrome
Soho/Tribeca
Village Voice

“Vega's imagination is rich and strange and manifests itself in delightful magic-realist stage wizardry. The show is a sort of meeting point between Ralph Ellison’s 'Invisible Man' and 'Pee-wee’s Playhouse'...Vega is an engaging performer, deftly switching between characters. Despite the ingenious staging, though, the piece overburdens its slight premise.” Full Review