Joe McGovern

Joe McGovern is a critic with Entertainment Weekly. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (14)
Animal
Chelsea
Entertainment Weekly

“Unfortunately, the material is replete with tired, female-cracking-up clichés, and coasts mostly on Hall’s considerable stage presence. For a while, that’s good enough… Hall’s performance devolves into a series of noisome rants...The dialogue reeks of playwriting, especially as we’re able to telegraph the clumsy direction that the story is going…Hall deserves sharper, tougher, better material. For a performer capable of such exquisite emotional control, 'Animal' is too off-the-leash.” Full Review

The Antipodes
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

"Baker’s writing this time is patchy, ranging from moments of bravura inspiration and humor to the humdrum...Ultimately, we’re waiting for a thematic crescendo that never arrives...Thanks to the ensemble, the journey never feels like too much of a slog...Director Neugebauer ably keeps the material alive...'The Antipodes,' echoing its own plot, is essentially an Annie Baker spitball session. And she’s built enough trust to throw an experiment our way, even if it doesn’t stick to the wall." Full Review

On the Exhale
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

"Composed in a lucid style by Martín Zimmerman and unobtrusively directed by Leigh Silverman, the material is sometimes too lumbering in convincing us of the professor’s 180-turn towards gun nuttery...But New York stage veteran Ireland gives a characteristically live-wire, throttling performance...There are a few moments during the final stretch of 'On the Exhale' where she turns so unnerving and unpredictable that we don’t know what to expect." Full Review

The Crucible
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

"The play’s easy-to-understand themes of mob mentality and mass hysteria have made it Miller’s most produced work, yet the piece is somewhat flat...Thus the prospect of maestro Belgian director Ivo van Hove putting his inimitable stamp on Miller’s work is too tantalizing to resist. Even if the results are mixed...Van Hove has a knack for stagecraft, that’s for sure...Van Hove’s bold, electric production doesn’t quite juice Miller’s morality play with the ambiguity it needs to be truly tragic." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"'White Rabbit Red Rabbit' by Nassim Soleimanpour — a dazzling, transcendent piece of alive-and-kicking avant-garde theater — is performed by a different lead actor or actress every time it’s staged...Without discussing its many dazzling swings in tone, I’ll say that it is steeped in self-referencing and metaphorical tales about animals, and builds to several surprisingly emotional peaks about the shared experience of art." Full Review

King Charles III
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

"Watching 'King Charles III' is like looking at the topographical landscape of a familiar world, one which we faintly recognize despite not having yet seen. It is as fresh, as thrilling, and as awesome as an undiscovered country." Full Review

Gloria
Gramercy
Entertainment Weekly

"But the play never sings with interpretive, inflammatory meaning...The words these characters speak don’t hold any compelling mystery about who they are, A touching, penetrating point about how each type of person we know, with minor adjustments, could be someone else. It’s the play’s only observation worthy of one of America’s most exciting dramatists." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

“Brown dumbfounds with a stunning colonnade of tricks, physical and psychological, limned by the sensation of third-rail danger…Brown is also acutely aware that his gifts of seduction and sleight of hand are used by con men for much less entertainment-related activities…He aims to prove the allure of chicanery by exhilarating the audience with its power…A thrilling spectacle. Especially for the die-hard doubters in the crowd, ‘Secret’ is real magic.” Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"His unforgettable performance in Arthur Miller’s 'The Price' is a serious reminder that DeVito belongs in the pantheon of greats. His supporting role completely steals the spotlight in this wobbly revival...Shalhoub succeeds most at suggesting a real life behind Miller’s verbal firecrackers. Ruffalo, flat and terribly miscast as a schlub...The playwright’s big mistake was in focusing the material on three other dullard characters when Solomon is obviously such an original creation." Full Review

Entertainment Weekly

"Foster, who seems to have mixed Cross Fit with Häagen-Dazs in his prep for Stanley, unselfishly resists the charismatic impulses of the part, playing him more as a banal slob. And that allows the transcendence and meaning of Anderson’s performance as Blanche to dominate...Anderson’s Blanche DuBois is such a real creation...And the sonic thunder of applause that comes from the audience should leave her no doubt, now or ever again, that she can always rely on the kindness of strangers.” Full Review

Blackbird
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

"The play itself, for all its explicitness of language, is somewhat unadventurous in scope. The material is self-evidently dark but the presentation is unrelentingly glum and lifeless...The play feels too severe and clandestine for such a big house...The reason why audiences are drawn to the drama is because of the two plumb roles that offer a pair of performers the ultimate emotional tussle. Williams and Daniels are more than up to the challenge of going down the play’s very dark road." Full Review

Misery
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

"Luckily, director Will Frears and stars Bruce Willis and Laurie Metcalf are all in synch with the plot’s lack of serious intent…Though the technical specs are excellent, the production suffers from a curious lack of tension. And, moreover, fun…Willis plays Paul with a flatness and passivity that feels too inert, even for a character who is bedbound. And as Annie, Laurie Metcalf is overly conscious of not echoing the line readings as they were delivered by Bates." Full Review

Fool For Love
Midtown W
Entertainment Weekly

"The slamming, which produces a stereo boom you can feel in your organs, eventually becomes rote and numbing. As does much else in this staunch, uninvolving production, which features tempestuous performers in Nina Arianda and Sam Rockwell, but offers them not much more than glum platitudes on bad romance...The feeling nags that this was a production simply too small for Broadway. " Full Review

The Flick
West Village
Entertainment Weekly

"Annie Baker’s moving, magnificent workplace comedy...'The Flick' is flawed, but in the way that all epic, idea-filled, great plays are. It’s overlong. So’s 'King Lear.' It’s repetitive. So is 'Long Day’s Journey Into Night.' More than anything, 'The Flick' is a masterpiece of tone. Baker knows that the greatest American dramas about how we live now rarely arrive at the party all dressed up as important works of art. We’d all be wiser for giving them a minute—or even 180 minutes—of our time." Full Review