Johnny Oleksinski

Johnny Oleksinski is a critic with New York Post. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (64)
New York Post

"Even if you’re a Scrooge when it comes to annual holiday fare, like I am, 'A Christmas Carol' succeeds as a strong piece of theater." Full Review

New York Post

"Norris has written a complex and compassionate play, but not a preachy or judgmental one. The audience is never pushed to forgive or condemn, but rather to evaluate." Full Review

New York Post

"If there is one thing that makes “Almost Famous' come alive, it’s watching two coming-of-age stories play out at once: One, about a young journalist figuring out his future. The other, about an exciting new Broadway actor stepping out onto the boards." Full Review

New York Post

"What the production never quite nails is the ghost story that hovers over the living room drama and how best to marry the two. So it leans too heavily on dreary scenery." Full Review

1776 (Broadway)
Midtown W
New York Post

"What the revival amps up most is the issue of slavery, which was already tackled in the original, so it’s only reiteration." Full Review

New York Post

"There is simply too much sprawl here for a just-over-two-hour runtime to contain, and there are so many lofty aims that don’t cohesively gel." Full Review

New York Post

"The young Prince of Wales and Duke of York wear glitter sneakers. Those shiny shoes exemplify the primary problem of this production: So much is going on, yet so little is going on." Full Review

New York Post

"Potential abounds in the tangled show, ... especially in its central idea: that, to the mile-a-minute mind of a 10-year-old, waking up wearing wet pajamas can feel as emotionally traumatic as an adult dealing with divorce or depression. Life already sucks, even at 10." Full Review

New York Post

"There’s one thing to kvetch about with 'Mr. Saturday Night': it would be better as a straight play than a song-and-dance show. Jason Robert Brown has composed a bland point-A-to-point-B score that’s not as hilarious or textured as the text. Similar to 'Tootsie' before it, the star here is the scenes, not the tunes." Full Review

New York Post

"'The Skin of Our Teeth' is trotted out every so often by theaters that wish to inform us that the writer of 'Our Town' also wrote other plays, like Shakespeare festivals and 'The Two Noble Kinsmen.' The points Wilder makes — that family life is a universal constant and that peaceful periods are inevitably followed by some natural disaster or geopolitical strife — are roughly the same as those of 'Our Town,' only less emotionally true and more self-indulgent and pretentious." Full Review

Hangmen (Broadway)
Midtown W
New York Post

"McDonagh fans will be delighted. The playwright gives his executioner and unhinged pervy weirdo the same sympathetic, funny treatment he gave a Northern Irish terrorist in the also teriffic 'The Lieutenant of Inishmore.' In fact, this is his finest play since that one, 16 years ago." Full Review

New York Post

"One thing that is so remarkable about Parker is her comfort on a Broadway stage. During the play, she sits at the edge and speaks to the audience so serenely and unwaveringly. Even big stars sometimes get the jitters and dive their hands into their pockets like a little kid hiding under the covers. Not Parker. Her simultaneous confidence and vulnerability is always worth experiencing, even when the production doesn’t share it." Full Review

Harmony
Financial
New York Post

"Manilow’s musical, which opened Wednesday night off-Broadway ... has a lot going for it. The drama is about a little-known, fascinating piece of World War II history that will have audiences racing to Google at intermission. Manilow’s score, with lyrics by Bruce Sussman, is pretty and occasionally touching. And all of the singers are sensational." Full Review

New York Post

"Nonetheless, Haidle’s plays (his better “Smokefall” did not receive the production it deserved when it played New York back in 2016) have a way of convincing every audience member they’ve been written just for them. “Birthday Candles,” at its best, bubbles up our own cherished and difficult memories of the people in our lives who’ve come and gone." Full Review

New York Post

"3.5/4 stars... It’s a taut and exciting play — and much more propulsive than your average spring ball game — that thankfully doesn’t concern itself with the endless sensitivities and triggers of 2022...The two most intriguing parts, however, are Davey Battle (Brandon J. Dirden) and Mason Marzac (Jesse Tyler Ferguson)...Don’t come to 'Take Me Out' for the feel-good uplift you got from 'Field of Dreams' and 'A League of Their Own' — come for 100-miles-per-hour, dirt-in-the-cleats drama." Full Review

Black No More
Midtown W
New York Post

"1.5/4 stars...Funnyish in parts, the humor is not deftly enough handled onstage. And lyrics sung by racist white Southerners...are disturbing and upsetting without being profound...Then comes the overwrought drama portion, in which you can sense lyricist and co-composer Trotter compromising to not stray too far from what we expect of a traditional musical...The tunes are lifted up by one of the best casts in New York — every single person is a glorious singer and actor. The musical is a colo... Full Review

New York Post

"That’s not the fault of Frost, the absurdly talented newcomer who captures Jackson’s voice and physicality well. On the contrary, we feel lucky to be witnessing the birth of a new Broadway star. The same is true of the wonderful Tavon Olds-Sample as “Thriller”-era Michael who, beaming, transports us back to the 1980s, even when the production around the actor does not. As mom Katherine Jackson, Ayana George has the show’s best musical moment when she duets on “I’ll Be There” with her son. ... Full Review

Company (Broadway)
Midtown W
New York Post

"Finally, a smart, funny, human revival about the highs and lows of being alive that actually feels alive. It helps that the show by Stephen Sondheim, who died last month, is the best musical about New York City ever written...No other show understands the callused skin that hardened, cynical New Yorkers develop to make it through another miserable day quite like “Company” does. Sondheim’s musical, splendidly directed by Marianne Elliott, is a paean to NYC about the pains of living in NYC." Full Review

New York Post

"Clarke is strong in a role that’s damn tough...Of course, Kushner and Tesori’s show has always been a pompous slip of a thing that’s rather high on itself. There are no melodies to speak of, and the whole score sounds like a wind chime." Full Review

New York Post

"Pass Over is a compelling, if flawed, way to start things off in Times Square...more modern than Sam’s tramps, but just as immobile." Full Review

New York Post

for a previous production "An uneven Alanis Morissette show" Full Review

New York Post

for a previous production 3/4 Stars "A towering Broadway performance" Full Review

New York Post

for a previous production 2/4 Stars "Broadway’s most thoughtful mess" Full Review

New York Post

“ '& Juliet' is a millennial-seeking missile aimed at audience members, such as myself, who grew up on Martin’s catchy tunes." Full Review

New York Post

"The cute new musical 'Kimberly Akimbo,' piles on weirdness with a dump truck.The mounting insanity almost becomes too much. Almost." Full Review

New York Post

"Director Kenny Leon has helmed a sharp, focused revival of the 2002 drama, with a pair of cracking performances that never let up." Full Review

New York Post

"The climactic fight all the way to the inevitable conclusion is not affectingly tragic, and there is no build to speak of. Nice songs, but not enough attention was paid to the basics." Full Review

New York Post

"In zig-zagging away from well-tread paths, Majok arrives at a destination we hadn’t planned to visit, but are pleased to be at nonetheless." Full Review

New York Post

"As far as literary stage adaptations go — a touch-and-go genre if there ever was one — 'The Kite Runner' is enormously satisfying and soulful." Full Review

New York Post

"The razor sharp focus here, instead, is on a divinely cast, crystal clear staging of the fairytale musical that intertwines the tales of Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, Jack and the Beanstalk and Rapunzel into a lesson about how adulthood has no happy ending. " Full Review

Macbeth (Broadway)
Midtown W
New York Post

"Director Sam Gold proves, once again, that he does not have a GoldenEye for staging Shakespeare’s plays. Craig, a fine actor in the past, is a victim of all the directing detritus. Gold seems to have told 007 and company to act detached and indifferent in this oh-so-violent and propulsive of works. Kings and murderers sound like Iowans discussing soybeans. " Full Review

POTUS
Midtown W
New York Post

"What will appeal to some of about Fillinger’s play — but what also holds it back — is that it’s cranked up to about an 11 from the second the lights go up. The best farces, as well as sit-coms, start with some serene normalcy before everything goes haywire. How can we perceive this world falling apart, and laugh uncontrollably, if we never see it put together?" Full Review

New York Post

"That said, the revival could be a whole lot better than the uninvolving stroll that director Michael Mayer has turned it into. High jinks, romance, heartbreak, Brooklyn, Broadway and Monte Carlo are all liquified into a tasteless goo. There’s hardly any variation to be found. Showstoppers don’t stop the show. Fanny and Nick grow on paper, yet they flatline where it counts most — live onstage." Full Review

New York Post

"The play comes across, unfortunately, as an antiquated time machine that’s at odds with the current conversation. Being a glimpse into a specific, different era would be OK — plenty of revivals fit that bill — but “for colored girls” seems awfully intent on speaking forcefully to the present moment. A strong connection to today, however, is nowhere to be found." Full Review

New York Post

"Mamet’s 47-year-old play hits harder than the many self-important staged newspaper op-eds of today. Most Americans continue to inhabit suffocating spaces, are glued to their work and will do anything for some quick cash. Now more than ever. We might not all buy and sell used lampshades, but 'American Buffalo' feels as if it’s about us." Full Review

New York Post

"Nothing in “The Little Prince” wakes you up so much as those flying follicles, and all of it is swallowed up by one of the theater district’s largest houses at 1,761 seats...The lack of a thrilling adventure, the middling spectacle, canned songs and a corny CGI landscape make for a “Prince” that’s much too petit for Broadway." Full Review

New York Post

"“Paradise Square,” which opened Sunday on Broadway, is a throwback to that gluttonous decade of stage sledgehammers such as “Ragtime” and everything Frank Wildhorn ever touched. It puts some 40 cast members in a dense historical sob-fest that wallops the audience with self-importance when it’s not lulling them into submission with more than 20 sad, derivative songs broken up by pointless dances." Full Review

New York Post

"3/4 stars...On the whole, director John Benjamin Hickey’s production could be funnier in spots. The final act doesn’t go as madcap as it might. And while there was a feeling on Broadway that they were miscast — Maureen Stapleton and the more macho Walter Matthau were in previous versions — there’s a tenderness to the married new stars that draws you in...The usual suspects will stick their noses up at 'Plaza Suite' — it’s old, it has no relevance today, blah blah blah — but there is nothing ... Full Review

New York Post

"Sometimes the show is dark and moody, determined not to have too much fun with a story about a con artist who wins in the end despite his misdeeds. At others, it’s the “Music Man” of our cringeworthy high school memories — painfully corny when it need not be. The friendly opening night crowd was not sure when to laugh at the jokes, and that’s a major problem for a musical comedy." Full Review

New York Post

"Being the only sober person in a room full of drunks is never any fun. Neither, as it would happen, is being an audience member at a musical about rich people who are high on LSD. At least its trippy cousin “Hair” has energetic songs and some cute hippies who jump around to them." Full Review

New York Post

"McClure is practically selling us a timeshare with his spastic, overeager performance. I can’t deny it’s technically very fine — he does funny voices: Gollum, Borat, Yoda — and jumps around like the stage is actually a trampoline. His high energy grates, though, and doesn’t get enough laughs to warrant acting like he’s on a two-and-a-half-hour coke binge." Full Review

New York Post

"And that’s what’s most successful about Scott’s writing — his ability to be both street-corner specific and universal at the same time. Find me a 35-year-old who can’t relate to debt and purposelessness." Full Review

New York Post

for a previous production "‘Girl From the North Country’ review: Bob Dylan on Broadway is a dud" Full Review

New York Post

"Laura Linney shines in Broadway’s blah ‘My Name Is Lucy Barton’" Full Review

The Inheritance
Midtown W
New York Post

"‘The Inheritance’ is a touching call to action on Broadway" Full Review

New York Post

"‘Cyrano’ review: Peter Dinklage musical is a moody mess" Full Review

Soft Power
East Village
New York Post

2/4 Stars "A head-scratcher with a twerking Hillary Clinton" Full Review

New York Post

3/4 Stars. "A sexy Tom Hiddleston leads Broadway’s ‘Betrayal’" Full Review