Joseph Cermatori

Joseph Cermatori is a critic with Village Voice. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (12)
Village Voice

“Jeffrey Hatcher’s witty, withering, endlessly entertaining (and super loose) adaptation, currently playing in a new production at the Red Bull Theater…It’s a play and a rendition that deserve to be seen. Director Jesse Berger taps straight into the grotesque veins in Gogol’s writing, coaxing stylized performances from his expert cast of clowns...Pretty much every member of the cast is delightful to watch…At the center of it all, Urie gives a performance that is close to flawless.” Full Review

Village Voice

“A vibrant new production…The play feels newly critical in our current neo–Gilded Age…As an analysis of the fault lines surrounding race in America, it also bristles today with a renewed urgency…Janney commands the stage with a calibrated mixture of poise, vulnerability, and bluntness. Hawkins scintillates in the role of Paul…Janney and Hawkins soon find their stride together, and as the play reaches its climax, they seize the rhythm of Guare's drama like a pair of virtuoso musicians.” Full Review

Village Voice

“’Joan’ misses the mark by a wide margin. Despite impressive vocals and dancing by the show's young and athletic ensemble, this show suffers from meager, often banal book- and lyric-writing, unwittingly raising the question of just how important Saint Joan's story is to our time…Joan shows little internal struggle or uncertainty...She wins support from her countrymen with no real resistance or dramatic conflict...The show trudges from one power ballad to the next.” Full Review

Candide
Upper W Side
Village Voice

"Despite vocally uneven results, the show radiates a high level of quality that recalls the now bygone Broadway of Prince’s past, before all the Disney and jukebox musicals moved in...Under the baton of Prince’s son, the conductor Charles Prince, the City Opera Orchestra interprets Leonard Bernstein’s score with richness, verve, and only a few missteps...The chorus soared to superb heights, particularly in finale." Full Review

Village Voice

"A sweet, charmingly spun tale of modern love and state bureaucracy…The setup blends elements of traditional stand-up comedy and queer solo performance…With just some desks and bookcases for scenery, the production uses sound effects to create a vibrant, zany mood. But there are more reflective moments, too…Onstage, Kelly cuts an affably geeky figure, deftly balancing Irish wit with broad physical comedy and moments of touching sentiment." Full Review

Good
Chelsea
Village Voice

"These are pessimistic plays, to be sure, but the productions brim with energy and humor. Both are staged simply, so that the focus stays on the texts and actors, who are impressive across the board…Michael Kaye is pitch-perfect as the conflicted, myopic Halder, a man by turns grandiose, dignified, and befuddled. Though timely, neither play is perfect...One does hope that its future seasons will include voices more directly in dialogue with the specific exigencies of our moment." Full Review

Indecent
Midtown W
Village Voice

"Full of clarity, tenderness, and warmth...The cast of actors and musicians assembled by Vogel and Taichman stands as their production’s great strength: The group creates its vividly bittersweet narrative together, as a team. Though Vogel deserves credit for crafting a sensitive play and for her overall achievement in the theater, a still greater message is meant to resonate in this ensemble structure." Full Review

Village Voice

"The Irish Rep production avoids critiquing O'Neill's text but still gives it an insightful, disturbing reading. As Jones, Abili stalks and rasps about the stage with mesmerizing focus and intensity...O'Reilly's production surrounds him with a whirlwind of scenic effects, all of which make the show feel more like a haunted house than an expressionist parable. But Abili shines through all this distracting cheesiness, creating a troubling portrait of Jones that sticks in the mind — and the gut." Full Review

The Liar
East Village
Village Voice

“It's a masterwork of baroque plotting, a little comic fugue in which the simplest of conceits leads to a host of convoluted entanglements. The biggest surprise is that Corneille, one of French literature's most revered tragedians, could be so funny…An expert dramatist in his own right and a delightful versifier, Ives is in top form. A virtuoso script like this will flounder without a strong hand and strong performers, but this show handles it spectacularly.” Full Review

Village Voice

"Though the script takes some predictable turns, Kitson’s performance is consistently delightful...Only occasionally does this set of deftly interlaced shaggy-dog stories start to feel a bit too shaggy. Some more compression would help streamline things, to avoid the feeling of an overly drawn-out conclusion, but 'Mouse' still manages to capture the audience’s imagination in a sticky, sweet, entertaining trap of a play." Full Review

No End of Blame
Chelsea
Village Voice

"These are pessimistic plays, to be sure, but the productions brim with energy and humor. Both are staged simply, so that the focus stays on the texts and actors, who are impressive across the board. Company stalwart and associate artistic director Alex Draper infuses the character of Veracek with a vivid sense of pathos…Though timely, neither play is perfect…One does hope that its future seasons will include voices more directly in dialogue with the specific exigencies of our moment." Full Review

Idiot
Soho/Tribeca
Village Voice

"The play doesn't live up to its conceptual or theatrical potential, in part because Lyons's script slashes Dostoevsky's massive novel down to 75 minutes and four characters. Neither the scenes nor their set elements ever fully cohere. The show has some high points: Daniel Kublick plays Myshkin with a touching naïveté, and multimedia elements bring his seizures vividly to life...But ultimately, like Dostoevsky's Prince, 'Idiot' doesn't ever find its way." Full Review