Judd Hollander

Judd Hollander is a critic with Epoch Times. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (94)
60
Stage Buzz

"This particular production unfortunately, suffers from numerous missteps...That's not to say there isn't a lot to like in the show. The entire cast projects an infectious enthusiasm in their performances and the Berlin score is a joy to hear...However all too often, this Encores! offering chugs along when it should soar and meanders when it should be tightly focused. It's not so much a bad production as a missed opportunity." Full Review

45
Stage Buzz

"'The True' falls rather flat. Clocking in at an hour forty-five, parts of the work still end up feeling bloated...On the plus side, Falco grabs and holds the spotlight as Polly...Unfortunately, Falco’s efforts are also hamstrung by the lackluster script...Feeling more like a novel one would read on a commute to kill time rather than a piece of theatre, 'The True' makes some interesting points; but other than a sterling performance by Falco, doesn't have that much to recommend it." Full Review

90
Epoch Times

“Groff has written a fascinating piece that shows both the passion and danger dreams can bring...Wolf’s direction is excellent throughout. Her efforts help to make sure that every moment—be it dramatic or humorous—is played for maximum effect. At the same time, she makes sure that no scene in the play overstays its welcome. Powerfully presented and completely absorbing...Poignantly recalls a tragic event in history worth knowing about.” Full Review

90
Epoch Times

"Hilarious, brilliant, and stomach-turning...Quite often the best way to get a message across is first to defuse controversy with laughter. Ireland masterfully does just that by taking a seemingly sane character and creating a completely outlandish set of circumstances...The play is helped tremendously by Featherstone’s on-point direction...Most importantly, Featherstone makes sure Eric’s diatribes never lag or seem overly pretentious...As Eric, Rea is nothing less than superb." Full Review

45
Stage Buzz

"Unfortunately Thorne loads up the story with so many characters and sub-plots, the show sinks under its own weight long before the final curtain...The various characters are only half-developed, while the audience experiences numerous plot lines which are often left hanging...Both the acting and directing are more than adequate here...Lila Neugebauer's direction moves the story along nicely as she works to bring some extra life to the various moments of tension and confrontation." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"Eden does a fine job as Anthony. He’s a sort of everyman...Unfortunately, while doing quite well in the later scenes, Eden is unable to play a 17-year-old convincingly...The rest of the cast is also very good...Ayckbourn’s directorial choices, other than as mentioned above, are pretty seamless. The segments and accompanying through-lines flow nicely from one scene to the next." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"Tightly directed and boasting four strong performances...What elevates this story to something more than a tale about a person with a disability is that it allows the audience to see Katy both from the outside and from within...Howarth seamlessly juggles the production's elements for maximum impact and nothing comes across as over the top or clichéd...Intimate, insightful, and ultimately uplifting...Offers some simple yet powerful lessons about growth, change, and acceptance by others." Full Review

90
Epoch Times

"The production uses what is basically a series of interlocking conversations to present an ultimately riveting tale...The play makes clear that being unhappy with the way things are is not an excuse to conceal the truth...The entire cast is excellent...Cullman's direction is pitch-perfect here...The true power of 'Lobby Hero' is the penetrating, yet deceptive simplicity of its text. It illustrates the importance of telling the truth, and the painful repercussions doing so may bring." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"A nostalgic work with more than a little heart...There’s something special about Runyon characters. They often inhabit the fringes of society yet have a unique moral code...Unfolding in leisurely fashion, the tale still manages to cram a lot of action into its deliberately meandering style. Though there are moments when events more than stretch the bounds of credibility, by the time they occur, we are too invested in the story and its characters to mind." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"Intelligent political drama...The only place where the play is lacking is in the number of characters it presents. It would have been more effective with a larger cast and, through them, a deeper exploration of the subject matter...The play is tightly directed by Kail, keeping the overall cynical nature of the work front and center as well as its ultimate lesson...A powerful and all-too-true reminder of how things often play out in politics." Full Review

65
Epoch Times

"Although there is no real villain in the story, there’s no one to really root for either. Lydia, who’s in almost every scene, turns out to be the least developed character in the play...The story would have also benefited had the audience had a chance to see a wider cross section of townspeople. Direction by Kate Whoriskey works well. She keeps the action moving nicely, as well as making sure the tension level is kept high in the various confrontations that occur, be they comical or dramatic." Full Review

90
Epoch Times

"Lithgow, in an absolutely sterling performance, uses the classic art of storytelling to take the audience on a journey through his own past, while also showing just how transformative the power of the spoken word can be...He throws himself full force into making the two stories come wonderfully, and, and at times, hysterically, to life...'Stories By Heart' shows the lasting emotional resonance a really good story can have." Full Review

90
Epoch Times

for a previous production “This site-specific and completely immersive production offers a poignant look at the emptiness of seemingly contented people...O’Reilly handles the material perfectly, letting events and moments slowly build until each of the characters becomes achingly real and alive. There is not a hint of the drabness that sometimes accompanies a period piece...A walk down a shadowed memory lane wrapped in the brightness of a holiday celebration, “The Dead, 1904” makes for a truly unforgettable experience." Full Review

75
Epoch Times

"The second act functions as a coda, though each works perfectly as a stand-alone offering. Not hysterically funny by any means, but definitely enjoyable, insightful, and presented by two first-rate performers, 'Marcel + The Art of Laughter' provides an excellent example of what comedy can be and how, while we may all find different things funny, we all enjoy having a good laugh." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

“This engaging production runs on all cylinders...McDonagh comes across as neither particularly endearing nor welcoming...He speaks with an air of authenticity and just a hint of attitude—in other words, as a quintessential New Yorker...The only problem with the show is that it’s too short...An absorbing portrait of a city and society in continual flux, as told by one who has lived through it, ‘Off the Meter, on the Record’ makes for an extremely satisfying journey.” Full Review

70
Epoch Times

"One of the highlights of the play shows the creative process of each man...Brancato’s direction works well, keeping the story tightly focused on the issues raised, with numerous bits of trivia tossed in. But the final scene feels rather contrived as though the playwright tries to end on a forced high note. While interest in 'Small World' will largely depend on how one feels about the two depicted, the play has a lot to say about the lengths one will go to realize their particular artistic vi... Full Review

55
Epoch Times

"Inconsistent and incomplete...The book presents the musical numbers as little more than a haphazard collection...Matters aren’t helped by the decision to have the show’s cast of nine all act as narrators taking on the identify of Prince himself...There’s a lot of fun to be had with 'Prince of Broadway.' The show contains songs that are enjoyable and a cast that is agreeable. However anything deeper is mostly lacking. Both Prince and the audience deserve a better effort." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"A somewhat softer and, at times, funnier show than when it first opened, which allows for a more well-rounded, if not always as intense, presentation...Lewis and Carmello, who does a very fine turn as the duplicitous Mrs. Lovett, have an excellent sense of timing, allowing some of the more comical moments to really shine...Buckhurst’s direction is pitch-perfect...This production takes what is essentially an epic story...and reduces it to something quite intimate." Full Review

75
Stage Buzz

"There is much to like in this production...Godwin nicely guides the story and performers through the different elements of the tale, and the sets and costumes by Paul Wills–the play is done in modern dress–all work well. The only sequence that really doesn’t work is a somewhat extraneous bit which takes place in a nightclub...Well presented, while taking pains not to hit the audience over the head with its message, this production of 'Measure for Measure' is quite the satisfying treat." Full Review

85
Stage Buzz

“A no-holds-barred satire of greed and corruption as told with the decorum of a Marx Brothers movie and a slight dash of ‘Blazing Saddles’…Subtle political satire this is not…Quite refreshingly, there is not a single redeeming character to be had in the entire play...Kudos to director Jesse Berger for helping to bring out a brilliant sense of comic timing from the company…A rollicking farce showing how the more things change, the more they stay the same.” Full Review

90
Epoch Times

"Brown offers a mystifying and quite fluid presentation of magical and mental acuity...His greatest talent is his ability to put the audience immediately at ease...Being too specific about what goes on would spoil the chance for future audiences to be enthralled, amazed, and downright astonished by the performance...While the show is rather long for one of this type, the entire piece moves briskly...A fascinating and surprisingly intimate experience." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"Director John Doyle has done an excellent job here, cutting scenes and songs from the original work to give the story a more streamlined approach, and at times, almost a fluidity. While the result may upset some theatrical purists, what one is left with is something quite intimate and emotionally connected. The cast, many playing multiple roles, is quite enjoyable...An eye-opening delight." Full Review

95
Epoch Times

"A brilliant achievement...The show makes you laugh and cry at the resiliency of the human spirit...The cast, all of whom play multiple roles, are quite simply fantastic. Christopher Ashley’s direction is letter-perfect, and Kelly Devine’s excellent musical staging includes a rousing opening sequence that helps to establish a small-town atmosphere for Gander. Alternatively funny and profoundly moving, 'Come From Away' is a brilliant example of all that musical theater can be." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"Wheeler and Sondheim have constructed a masterful morality tale, which warns of the dangers of blind vengeance. The theme is evident in Secomb’s utterly brilliant performance. His face is alive with the light of madness, his entire body on a continual hair trigger, and woe to anyone who gets in his way...Greatly adding to the production’s overall impact is the excellent work of director Bill Buckhurst and choreographer Georgina Lamb...An altogether satisfying meal." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"The actor clearly wants the audience to have a communal experience with him...What the character fails to see is that personal memories don’t always translate well when people haven’t been through the same events...This quibble aside, 'Object Lesson' is quite enjoyable and refreshingly different from anything else on the NY theatrical scene this season. Sobelle turns in a tour-de-force performance as he keeps the audience guessing throughout a not always linear but often insightful journey." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"Calvin Trillin’s way of not only letting people know who Alice was, but also showing just how much she was part of his existence...An alternately lighthearted and somber journey through points in the couple’s life...While the specter of Alice’s illness is ever-present, it’s the relationship between the couple that forms the linchpin of the story, particularly the way they complement each other...A touching story of a somewhat familiar yet quite unique, very moving journey." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"The first thing you notice when actress Renée Taylor makes her entrance is how at ease you feel in her presence. She comes on with a bit of regal air but quickly shifts to that of a favorite aunt welcoming you into her home...Nicely mixing elements poignant, personal, and comedic, 'My Life on a Diet' makes for an enjoyable experience, both in terms of one woman’s struggle to comes to terms with how she sees herself, and in showing the very full life she has led." Full Review

55
Epoch Times

“Stellar cast, but too much story is lost...While the elements for a classic melodrama are all there, the work ultimately suffers from a lack of subtlety and characterization...Doyle’s often lackluster direction puts too much emphasis on emotion rather than characterization, missing nuances...The script was initially two acts...perhaps too much of the story has been lost...All too frequently, the lyrics are impossible to hear clearly. They’re often drowned out.” Full Review

65
Epoch Times

“Audience interaction is often an integral part of any show of this type, Vitaly takes it to the extreme...It’s not long before a feeling of repetition sinks in, not with the illusions, but in the set-ups and ongoing banter with every person who takes part...He tries too hard...instead of just letting his efforts speak for themselves...A fun piece for children...However, with a bit of restructuring or by having one of the creative team act as director, it could have been something far more sp... Full Review

90
Epoch Times

for a previous production “Knowles’s harrowing drama...based on actual events...What makes the entire experience so riveting, are the men presented. The play deeply examines just who these men were...The acting is very strong. The portrayal of each man is distinct enough to create a compelling picture, both as individuals and as friends. Most striking is how at ease they are with each other...Shanahan’s direction is excellent...Both a stirring historical lesson and a powerful human experience.” Full Review

75
Epoch Times

"It’s a testament to the text that one cannot always see where the story is going as it’s so full of comedic twists and turns...Ives has made his story so topical that one can’t help but wonder how it will fare in years to come, when faced with changing tastes and sensibilities...Despite these quibbles, Kahn’s direction is sure handed, making each situation flow seamlessly into the next. The farcical situations, misconceptions, and overall hysteria build to a huge and hilarious crescendo." Full Review

95
Stage Buzz

"One of the best shows of this or any other theatre season...Featuring a tour-de-force performance by Piper...Stone's staging of his own adaptation is nothing short of brilliant...Another essential element of the story is the very intriguing set...Interesting when it starts and riveting by the time it finishes, 'Yerma' works best because it never forgets the various human elements in this all-too-real situation." Full Review

45
Epoch Times

"Those involved in the creative process were unable to make the story fully come alive in this different medium...And while the youngsters in the audience certainly found it enjoyable, the result is disappointing...The show’s creators seemed more concerned with hitting certain high points than with telling the story as a whole...On the acting front, Levy is excellent as the tormented Elsa...The real treat of the show is Olaf...What has ended up on stage lacks much of the film’s original charm." Full Review

90
Epoch Times

"The drama offers a penetrating look at those who suffer from mental illness and at those who try to help them...Abraham offers what amounts to a masterclass in acting with his performance as Barnard...Direction by Scott Elliott is masterful; he keeps the story moving smoothly throughout. From almost the first moment of the play, we feel a violent situation may suddenly erupt...Rabe has crafted a very affecting tale. Intense, touching, and at times heart-wrenching." Full Review

85
Stage Buzz

"A powerful revival...Walsh's writing has never felt more alive...Campbell gives a powerhouse performance as Pig...Lynch is excellent as Runt...Haidar directs the show with sure and steady hand. Using the text as a guide, he allows the actors free reign to basically explode off the stage. While at the same time, making sure the images and feelings that result are completely understandable to the audience. Even if the dialogue may not always be." Full Review

65
Epoch Times

"Played almost entirely for laughs, the play's dialogue is peppered with backhanded compliments...Unfortunately, the play remains at the level of a television sitcom, with little opportunity for the audience to understand the characters...'Party Face' reminds me of a frothy desert. It tastes good initially, but by end, I found myself wishing for something more substantial. Cute and funny, with elements of something serious underneath, the work never rises to its full potential." Full Review

70
Epoch Times

"Stirring drama...A particularly nice touch is how many of those closest to Jack see the change in him after meeting Joy long before he himself does...Gerroll is excellent as Jack...The only problems with the show can be found in Christa Scott-Reed’s direction. Some of the scenes don’t flow into one another as well as they should...A tale about making the most of the time allotted to us and shows the importance of never taking for granted those we care about most." Full Review

65
Stage Buzz

for a previous production "Crudup gives a powerful performance...'Harry Clarke' proves to be an interesting experience...Unfortunately, the playwright never decides exactly what he wants to focus on...As such, good as the piece is, one eventually begins to listen to it with a rather detached air...Crudup does an excellent job in taking on the personas of the various roles...An enjoyable experience, but the tale related doesn't go deep enough to make it something really special." Full Review

45
Stage Buzz

"While certainly a subject worth discussing, things start to become repetitive rather quickly...None of the characters feel in any way three-dimensional, and thus, not all that interesting. Rather ironic, since just about all of those depicted are real people...Despite the work's various shortcomings, the cast give it their all...A fascinating tale and one that certainly deserves to be told. 'Illyria,' however, is not the vehicle with which to tell it." Full Review

90
Epoch Times

“What could easily have been a Lifetime movie of the week, becomes much more in the capable hands of the show’s creative team. Donnelly’s text deftly switches from comic to dramatic and back again…None of the characters feel in any way contrived…Brady’s direction shows a real feel for the story. The moments, scenes, and emotions shift effortlessly from one to the next to the ending which feels totally right. Touching, powerful, and above all, honest.” Full Review

85
Epoch Times

"The work covers no new ground and makes no sweeping statements, yet it succeeds brilliantly due to every moment coming across as real...Stephens has done a brilliant job in making these characters resonate so strongly...Neil Pepe’s direction is quite strong...Probing, intimate, and deliberately untidy, 'On the Shore of the Wide World' shows just what the concept of 'family' can entail. At the same time, it examines the joy, comfort, pain, and responsibility that go with it." Full Review

55
Epoch Times

"While the play touches on some very serious issues and offers a number of touching moments, this production often feels like a situation comedy, with snappy rejoinders coming thick and fast; or, alternatively, as a schmaltzy 'disease-of-the-week' television movie. Many of these problems come from Kauffman’s direction...Has a lot to say about the sacrifices people make for those they care about. The current Broadway revival however, doesn’t say it as well as it could." Full Review

70
Epoch Times

"For all its power and topicality, the current stage adaptation doesn’t present its message as cleanly as it could...Without question, '1984' is riveting. The work contains emotional twists and turns that at times feel like a punch in the gut. Yet, despite all of this, several creative choices end up defusing the overall effect...While the production is not nearly as powerful as it could have been, it still packs a wallop and is definitely more than worth the price of admission." Full Review

70
Epoch Times

"The main attraction of the show is the easy camaraderie between the townspeople of Harrison...Sosko does a great job as Henry...Henry’s eventual meeting with Margaret Rose is particularly heart-wrenching...The only cast member not quite in sync with the story is Lichty...Despite a few missteps, 'The Traveling Lady' is quite the pleasant experience, with the show offering a gently layered look at a time when the world moved a little slower." Full Review

90
Epoch Times

"A triumph on every level...The genius of Stewart’s book is that it makes Dolly more than just the title character. She’s the fulcrum around which the others orbit...The production allows Herman’s gloriously hummable score to sparkle throughout...Boasting an absolutely top-notch cast, and without a false note anywhere, this production allows the audience to rediscover a show that is both a clear star vehicle and one chock-full of characters with their own problems, hopes, and dreams." Full Review

90
Stage Buzz

“Wiest is at the top of her game as Winnie, bringing the character fully to life in a tour-de-force performance. Despite the challenges of performing in an increasingly constrained position, she projects more than enough power and presence to pull it all off…Masterfully done, this production presents a powerful view of a woman in the middle of a very personal journey. Though where she's going and where she's been are matters left up to every member of the audience.” Full Review

55
Epoch Times

“Sadly, the show fails to keep faith with its source material, proving to be an uneven mixture of satire and wistfulness…The show’s creators aren’t sure whether to present a childhood fantasy or a dark allegory...The musical numbers written especially for the stage are not nearly as strong as the tunes used in the film…But Borle does an excellent job...‘Charlie’ reminds one of a rather misshapen cake. It may taste okay, but the proper overall effect is lost.” Full Review

85
Epoch Times

“McLean masterfully embodies British novelist, literary critic, and scholar Lewis…As the title makes clear, Lewis eventually came to his conversion begrudgingly, though McLean’s performance makes clear the great contentment and wonder he felt when he finally got there...McLean wonderfully embodies Lewis, presenting him as a fully formed individual. The character speaks in clear, genial tones and sounds like a welcoming professor inviting his listeners to come in and hear his latest lecture." Full Review

85
Epoch Times

“A striking revival…Both the playwright and director Arin Arbus make clear that if the audience starts to feel too comfortable with the story, then they are not doing their jobs. Arbus deserves credit for taking the script, which, in the wrong hands could easily become a lengthy farce or an endless diatribe, and turning it into a compelling story of one family’s survival and, through them, the survival of humanity...A fascinating look at what human beings are capable of." Full Review

80
Epoch Times

"The most insidious societal changes don’t occur through quick or violent means. Rather they are so quiet and unobtrusive one never notices them until it is too late. This chilling point is brought home in 'Evening at the Talk House'...The cast is excellent...Scott Elliot’s direction is nicely restrained, allowing the power of the text to take hold and turn a simple premise into something sinister." Full Review