K Krombie

K Krombie is a critic with Stage Buddy. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (34)
Hangmen
Chelsea
Stage Buddy

"Flynn plays Mooney to perfection with just enough seesaw villainy and likely lad nerve to keep you guessing as to his motives...The exceptional cast, gamely directed by Dunster, triumph in anguish and comedy...When Syd performs a clumsy chair stunt to conceal ghastly suffering, it is a moment of after-dark Buster Keaton hilarity...'Hangmen' tugs at the rotten business of retribution at the same time as eliciting unrepentant laughter. It may be McDonagh's best play yet." Full Review

The Home Place
Chelsea
Stage Buddy

"There are some commendable performances, particularly from the older members of the cast who add substance to the perception of a conceited class. At times, Moore's directorial grasp slips. What should be the play’s dramatic pinnacle, collapses under chaos...'The Home Place' is nevertheless an important play that digs deep into the blight of the soul that scurries within oppressive power." Full Review

Rooms
Midtown W
Stage Buddy

“Each of IAC’s 'Rooms' allows immersive rifling and snooping before and during the audio...It is Room 303 that is the standout piece. A dying man in a poky hotel room focuses on the futility of his lot, personified by an annoying fly. Buggy’s delivery of Walsh’s words is beautifully poignant and droll, a playwright’s dream.” Full Review

Spill
Midtown W
Stage Buddy

"'Spill’s' outstanding cast, ill-boding sound and inventive staging upon a simple, scenic design succeed in cracking the artifice of theater by cramming the audience into the Deepwater Horizon...This documentary, verbatim-style play gets to the human core of a tragedy and the everyday struggles of people who have little option but to rely on the work opportunities that their habitat provides." Full Review

Anna Christie
East Village
Stage Buddy

"Plaehn has a strong stage presence...Aiello and Johnson convince and amuse in their supporting roles while D’Ambrose plays beautifully...Chase’s Irish accent often wanders too big an ocean and it appears to distract him from being altogether present...Towards the end of the play, there is too much demonstrative melodrama as the two men react to Anna’s confession, which raised titters from the audience. This aside, Richards' handling of 'Anna Christie' anchors a steady balance." Full Review

A Taste of Honey
Midtown W
Stage Buddy

"The dimensions of the Greater Manchester dialect, not an easy undertaking, are accomplished at a pace that while occasionally wandering into Scotland via Liverpool, hook onto the pivotal cadence of the wittier exchanges, of which there are plenty...Botchan plays Helen with a likability that is less apparent on the page...Director and all-rounder Austin Pendleton, together with a great cast, have successfully revitalized a time and a place that prefaced the ‘British Invasion.'" Full Review

Crackskull Row
Chelsea
Stage Buddy

for a previous production "Molloy puts a spell on words and rearranges them according to the rasp of her own rhythm. They are lyrical and symmetrical and pauses are necessary to soak them in. The excellent cast place their bets on the melody and they are all the more tuneful for it. Director Kira Simring leads from the language and guides lust and menace in the actions and breathing space." Full Review

Butler
Midtown E
Stage Buddy

"Adamson plays Butler as large as he can be and his transitioning from rage to compunction and back again is a joy to watch…Shepard Mallory, assisted by Williams’ bold and lively portrayal, is similarly contrary and sporadically aggressive, but the good sense of his plea contains a tempting compromise…Playwright Strand’s decision to put emphasis on comedy may have been risky, but 'Butler' loses none of its pathos in revelry." Full Review

No End of Blame
Chelsea
Stage Buddy

"In 'No End of Blame,' political cartoonist Bela is played with affecting assurance by Draper...Bela, as is the deliberate staple of many of Barker's plays, is morally ambiguous, likeable and unlikeable in varying measures and ego-driven yet pragmatic...The truth of his artistic conviction reveals not only the truth of art in media, but more of the man and the conflict he will be forever up against while colluding with power...The cast is excellent, especially with such challenging text." Full Review

YOUARENOWHERE
Financial
Stage Buddy

"'YOUARENOWHERE' is reminiscent of the best of David Lynch….Impressions on the selectivity of love and the taking for granted of our perceptions on alternate and interior worlds manage to achieve mathematical and philosophical coherency as well as a sense of humor. Besides the sonic and visual accomplishments, Schneider's physical theater precision is mesmerizing. At the show's crescendo, he achieves a tour de force that is best experienced with no prior knowledge of it." Full Review

Please Continue
Midtown W
Stage Buddy

"These dual storylines tackle the various aspects of cruelty in conformity with considerable intelligence...Subtle humor is carefully allocated while acutely written dialogue and a smart ensemble cast play with the topics of doubt and discovery with powerful sensitivity. Director Carden gracefully draws humanity from self-analysis and poignancy from complexity. An ambitious undertaking....Its thought-provoking results deserve further investigation. A must see." Full Review

The Gambler
East Village
Stage Buddy

"Maxwell's adaptation of 'The Gambler' is buoyant and surprisingly cheerful, but manages to maintain the philosophical backbone of Dostoyevsky's writing. Director Lordi-Kirkham has made sure that the cast know their characters' bones. The slip from jovial to earnest and back again has few flaws." Full Review

Key Change
East Village
Stage Buddy

"All of the performances are rough, bloody and believable...Within the cast, amid poetic form, physical theater, considerable comedy and the rasp of straight talking, real tears are shed. A statement of 'It's my last time' by a repeat offender is as funny as it is tragic. The notion of a happy ending sends itself up, but crucially, it is not without hope. Throughout, 'Key Change' is a well-crafted, sensitively directed and impressively performed piece of theater." Full Review

Cloud Nine
Chelsea
Stage Buddy

"The accuracy of cut-glass English and regional London accents may waver occasionally but by and large, the character and gender swapping cast capture the burdens of empire and the permissive levity required by the play's two halves. Director James MacDonald has the 'Cloud Nine' pace merrily galloping the round while the play itself is a punctual reminder of what bad history can breed." Full Review

Stage Buddy

"Outstanding performances succeed in filling out the framework of both the main and minor roles with depth, pathos and believability. Part crime caper, part road play, 'Little Thing, Big Thing' takes us on a wildly imaginative tour from the beautifully rugged County Mayo to the River Liffey and scene-setting landmarks of Dublin. In other parts, playwright O'Kelly's language is rich and colorful enough to rival sentences lifted from the pages of Flann O'Brien or James Joyce...A must-see." Full Review

Doctor Faustus
East Village
Stage Buddy

"At its worst, 'Doctor Faustus' impropriety is its only consistency; red noses and water pistols are among the many things missing from its clownish attempts at comedy. At times, pantomime and 'Springtime for Hitler' came to mind. There are frequent and uncomfortable attempts at audience participation including a singalong that only a lean echoey subsection sang along to...In the right hands, Marlowe's provocative morality play endures still. In the wrong hands however, the devil makes work." Full Review

Poor Sailor
Brooklyn
Stage Buddy

"The play loses scope within its conflicting components...the combination of emotive minimalism and frenetic movement becomes fractured and bewildering...Overall, this is an inventive and appealing production, let down in part by direction that every so often, sets the story adrift." Full Review

Stage Buddy

“Gallagher has shaped a gloomy atmosphere...The stamina of Meyer’s distressed physicality often emotes more than the conversational pieces; at times the attention to dialogue exposes the potential that is absent from the more contemplative segments...An eloquently written, thoughtful play; in this instance, well put together, if not a little too restrained...Overall, the Gallery Players’ production is commendable for its safeguarding of a heart-rending story.” Full Review

Stage Buddy

“Casual observers of the play can marvel at the sinewy, shirtless, Lego-abdominal wonder of it all. But at times, it is their exuberant buoyancy that challenges the notion of whether this version of droog mishaps should necessarily be avoided on a dark night…At its very best, 'A Clockwork Orange' shows us the jubilance in ferociousness…The physical precision executed here is inventive and impressive.” Full Review

Arlington
Brooklyn
Stage Buddy

“Walsh binges himself on multiple loose theatrical forms and multi-media formats, all expertly done, but the clang made when they all come together can make more noise than sense. At times. At other times, the raw emotion is astonishing...Amidst hard times, the done thing in creativity is to visit dystopian isolation. There’s a sense that whatever Walsh is doing here is far less political than it is personal, giving him free rein." Full Review

The Penitent
Chelsea
Stage Buddy

"Director Neil Pepe has a tough job with characters that begin at a not too far away distance from where they end. It must be difficult to guide a cast whose job it is to act as a thin veil for Mamet’s temper. The dialogue -- that famous Mamet Speak that interrupts and overlaps and pauses at brief, measured counts -- comes to life only hastily, in particular during the one scene in which Gilliard Jr. and Bauer appear together, but from Pidgeon’s mouth, it may as well be Morse Code." Full Review

Stage Buddy

"The international cast have had their respective accents successfully neutralized by dialect coach Patricia Fletcher, but it is their otherness that provides a unique take on this English play...Director Martin has kept the production simple and bare. His precision with rhythm and restraint reveal someone who understands that adding too much to Pinter is reductive. There are no unnecessary flourishes here and the play is all the more powerful for it." Full Review

The Birds
Midtown E
Stage Buddy

"The staging is hell-bent on claustrophobia and assisted in the main by visual and audio effects...Some of the effects are distracting...The actors are at their best in the celebratory or confrontational scenes where the effects are absent or minimal. McPherson is a master of his craft and with this play, the able-bodied text dictates simplicity. This is a flawed production that nevertheless possesses moments of genuinely affecting suspense." Full Review

Quietly
Chelsea
Stage Buddy

"What follows, anger and poignancy, acrimony and assent, exists equally in electrified silences and fraught discourse...Under Jimmy Fay’s assertive direction, it is the silences that offer a wider gap for us to step into, observe and absorb. 'Quietly' is a thrilling, moving and prompt reminder of the consequences of conflict on ordinary citizens from the ground up; highly recommended." Full Review

Good
Chelsea
Stage Buddy

"Director Petosa places the seductive dreaminess of romance, desire and self-satisfied ambition under the grip of a nightmare that sheds none of its savagery with the passing of time…John’s career-rise and morality-fall via what Maurice calls his 'Nazi school of psychiatry' are convincing…The play is elevated by a group of actors who are evidently committed to the work and to collaboration…Out of the two plays, 'Good' is the dominant force, but both are persuasive and worryingly topical." Full Review

Stage Buddy

“Words, their syntax and sound, provide the blood flow of the play, but it is Duffin, in a pin-drop portrayal of a damaged but smart individualist, that sustains its pulse; so too the mix of traditional, pitiful, vicious and funny characters in her midst, all of whom Duffin seamlessly transforms into….For those who wish to see something truly extraordinary, albeit complex and emotionally demanding, ‘A Girl’ should not be missed.” Full Review

Prodigal Son
Midtown W
Stage Buddy

"Quinn's floppy-haired adolescent angst, his constant questioning and his 'Catcher in the Rye' craftiness seem at times too fictionally familiar to be realistically credible, despite stimulating dialogue and Chalamet's riveting star-turn performance...His tenacity appears to draw weakness from the worn-out adults trying to make a living, if not a difference, at Thomas More Preparatory School. Perhaps 'Prodigal Son's' main failing is that the adults appear more deserving of our empathy." Full Review

Creditors
East Village
Stage Buddy

"David Grieg's updated version of August Strindberg's play upholds the agitated passions and turmoil of the original, but for subtle changes to the expanse of text…Under Kevin Confoy's precise, tense direction, actors Craig Smith and Elise Stone portray neurosis with an undertaking that is both intellectually and viscerally effective…The three leads get the better of their audience with the persuasive delivery of credible notions and formidable grudges." Full Review

Stage Buddy

"For any up-and-coming playwright, the 'LaBute New Theater Festival' is a big deal...The problem with 'Kandahar' is that it is exquisitely written, thus highlighting where the preceding one-act plays fall short. LaBute's chilling and masterful final segment hinders the overall effect by overshadowing the very material that the festival is showcasing, as if to say, just prior to the curtain call, 'This is how it's done.'" Full Review

Cuckooed
Midtown E
Stage Buddy

"In 'Cuckooed,' Thomas relives his ordeal and puts its consequences very much in the present. Martin has never attempted to explain his activities, but the 'why' is not the point of the show. Instead, this is Thomas' successful bid to get us to invest and empathize with a very personal story of activism, camaraderie, and the long-term and far-reaching effects of deception." Full Review

The Quare Land
Gramercy
Stage Buddy

"Playwright McManus took his inspiration for 'The Quare Land' from a bathtub scene in the Clint Eastwood movie 'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.' The play has a satisfying lawlessness that fits the stimulus. It is funny, wicked and full of mischief. O'Reilly's direction reels in the darkness with as much adeptness as Hugh Pugh's beer retrieving pulleys." Full Review

Pound
Lower E Side
Stage Buddy

"Gomez is lewd, raw, unapologetic and crucially, very funny. Those who prefer their erotic theater entertainment subtly nuanced may not respond to 'Pound...' This is an all-inclusive highly energetic ride that is consistent with the audience's enthusiasm and standing ovations." Full Review

Stage Buddy

"'In My Father’s Words' is a bittersweet tale of loss and language. The story arc is not so unfamiliar, but Philip Howard’s attentive direction puts the right amount of emphasis on the play's tender moments, which are as captivating as the unfolding revelations." Full Review

Stage Buddy

"A compelling assemblage of repressed desires and amusing asides with subtly nuanced performances. The set alludes to the elements of loss and obsession while the lighting cleverly guides the audience through various dramatic inclinations...This is a commendable production and a must-see." Full Review