Kathryn Osenlund

Kathryn Osenlund is a critic with Phindie. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (13)
Phindie

“Ludwig and director Amanda Dehnert turn ancient Greek theatre on its head...This show feels like it really should be a musical...The broad strokes of a charming and clever comedy are hidden under an avalanche of frenetic activity...A cast of excellent NY actors, marvelous costumes, good sound, and clever designers. And yet it feels like it’s running amok...Full of good will and theatrical fluff, this World Premiere just needs sorting out.” Full Review

Must
Midtown W
Phindie

“Stewart as Pat Garrett manages to inject some life into his lines, but due to the static, measured nature of their recitations it’s hard to tell about the other, no doubt fine, Equity actors. While the slow formality of Weissman’s direction honors the show’s intentions, the pacing proves too deadly even for dead people...Charles Cissel, as evidenced by the sad, staged poetics of Billy the Kid, is much more likely a poet than a playwright.” Full Review

Debriefing (FringeNYC)
Lower E Side
CurtainUp

"In the last few years several new plays have treated prevailing concerns of espionage or terrorism in a compelling way. Unfortunately, in its current manifestation, this play isn't one of them...Despite the intricate set up of the plot and the cast's very competent acting, interest flags as the belabored and over-written play dissipates its potential energy. Quicker, crisper scenes would cover the same territory while retaining audience attention." Full Review

CurtainUp

"A big part of the theatricality is, of course, watching an Asian man portray a white man struggling to come across as Asian...It's funny yet painful when this Asian actor dons the movie costume of a robe, glasses with stereotypical Jap round black frames, and two cartoon-like oversized front teeth. He succeeds in letting us know that this kind of casting is ugly and out of date, and the total transition to a more evolved, realistic, and enlightened view of various races is still overdue." Full Review

CurtainUp

"The brilliance of this esoteric art lies in the intimate intersection of the new music and the venerable images on the screen. At times sweet and benign, at times driven and relentless, the music accompanies the German Expressionist aesthetic of distorted perspectives, powerful clashing of light and dark, and long, convoluted shadows...Singer and Cohen approach the sound with precision and lots of spirit." Full Review

CurtainUp

"The paper-thin premise is milked for all it's worth, embellished with twins, jokes, songs, impersonations, various trajectories, and references to an old 'SNL' sketch that featured Christopher Walken...This good-natured, high energy show is very fringe—fast, frenetic, and loose. It's just that in invoking Walken's peculiar menace and idiosyncrasy, you might expect a tad more sophistication." Full Review

Phindie

for a previous production "We armchair travelers participate in the discoveries that virtual travel affords. Even as Phillips’s fancy footwork throughout his rich space-and-time travel extravaganza entertains, we may learn something too, beyond the abuses of officialdom and the acquisition of some foreign words." Full Review

King Kong (NYC)
Midtown W
Phindie

“Stagecraft is king in 'Kong.' ‘Dramatic’ doesn’t even come close to conveying the startlingly original complexity of the rich visuals...And then there’s the Monster...Killer spectacle outshines wimpy dialogue that could use more linguistic rhythm and richness of wit...Despite its problems with dialogue, songs, lyrics, and details like the humanity issue, ‘King Kong’ is appealing and sometimes outstanding. I wouldn’t want to miss it.” Full Review

ChipandGus (FringeNYC)
Soho/Tribeca
CurtainUp

for a previous production "There's propulsion under their chatter. Their verbal badinage is a surface sport, a kind of screen that keeps troubling little things from falling through...Although the talk ranges all over the place, it's a tight play with a ping-pong kind of metronome behind it. Ahlin and Mullen, who bring their star quality to the acting, collaborated on the writing of 'ChipandGus.' You don't have to be a member of the intelligentsia to enjoy this lively play, but it wouldn't hurt!" Full Review

CurtainUp

for a previous production "'Dementia Americana' has many, many scenes that move along, never showing more than needed or wasting time belaboring. A key scene features a very clever instance of reverse-staging. D'Amato, who plays Harry Thaw, absolutely slays with his fearless and energetic acting. The versatile cast truly impresses in shifting roles...This show's a keeper. If you go, do try to sit down front." Full Review

CurtainUp

"Top-notch quintessential fringe…'The Seagull' is the template, and they run with it like running with scissors. The solid script, updated with a bad mouth and attitude, allows the huge reflex to comedy to float above the tragedy…There's precision direction, four all-around excellent actors, fluid minimal set, and a smart structure… If you know Chekhov's 'Seagull' you'll appreciate the echoes. If you don't, you'll applaud the sheer entertaining theatricality." Full Review

Cabtivist (FringeNYC)
Soho/Tribeca
CurtainUp

“The Cabtivist holds his audience 'cabtive' as he regales with tales of cabbie adventures...McDonagh's standup is rife with outrageous tales, and he has pictures and videos to prove it. Blessed with the Irish gift of gab and disarming humor, he peppers his story with facts that are not necessarily widely known." Full Review

The Total Bent
East Village
Phindie

"Director Joanna Settle keeps up the pace and holds things together as much as possible in this soulful, nonlinear, and humorously serious work. But the music-driven trajectory with scattered story fragments floating in and out seems more like separate bents than a total bent...Toward the end the convoluted narrative arc bends, and the musical becomes a rock concert. The music is so entertaining that you almost don’t care that the text is a bit of a rambling mess." Full Review