Lawrence Harbison

Lawrence Harbison is a critic with The Playfixer. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (14)
The Low Road
East Village
The Playfixer

"Terrific...'The Low Road' is an epic drama about American capitalism, set in the mid-18th Century, narrated by the Scottish economist Adam Smith, whose 'The Wealth of Nations' is capitalism's foundational text. Norris explores the many contradictions of unrestrained capitalism by focusing on the career of a poor foundling determined to succeed, willing to stop at nothing, including murder. Rarely do we get to see a play with such a large cast." Full Review

The Playfixer

"Wild, profane and extremely funny...I saw McGrath as Springer, who took over for the run's extension from Mann. He's fine, but he still looks like a kid, albeit with gray in his hair. Swenson, on the other hand, is wonderful, as you might expect, and the ensemble cast is phenomenal...Our top director of comedy, Rando, has outdone himself here, and the book and lyrics by Thomas are hilarious, and the music by Lee and Thomas is one wonderful song after another." Full Review

Kings
East Village
The Playfixer

"'Kings' is about the corrosive influence of money in American Politics. Its central character is a recently elected, crusading Congresswoman determined to change the System. Set against her are two lobbyists (one of whom decides to join he in her crusade) and a powerful business-as-usual Senator. Eisa Davis is wonderful as the Congresswoman, and the always-excellent Zach Grenier is delightfully smarmy as the Senator." Full Review

Dogs of Rwanda
Chelsea
The Playfixer

"'Dogs of Rwanda', a monodrama by Sean Christopher Lewis at Urban Stages, is a narrated tale wherein a man tells of his personal experience with the Rwandan genocide while he was a teenaged missionary. He’s published a book about this horrific experience and has been contacted by a survivor who has criticized him for not telling the whole story. Dan Hodge is mighty fine as Our Narrator, but there is no escaping the fact that this is a story, not a play, albeit a most compelling one." Full Review

Illyria
East Village
The Playfixer

“There is almost no plot, but it’s fascinating to watch and hear these young versions of people who went on to great success as they try to figure out how to keep Papp’s dream afloat...Nelson has directed the play and much of it is 'conversational’ – meaning so low in volume that even I, sitting in the second row, missed a lot of it...If you are fascinated with this period in our theatre history, I think you will have a good time. If you’re not, you’ll probably find ‘Illyria’ a tough slog." Full Review

The Home Place
Chelsea
The Playfixer

"Like all of Friel’s plays, it takes place in the fictional Irish town of Ballybeg in County Donegal....While not top-drawer Friel, ‘The Home Place’ is nonetheless an enjoyable drama, subtly structured, and Irish Rep Artistic Director Charlotte Moore’s direction is superb. Her cast is excellent. It is difficult for me to pick out any faves, but if I had to I would put my finger on John Windsor Cunningham as Christopher and Rachel Pickup as Margaret." Full Review

The Portuguese Kid
Midtown W
The Playfixer

“Jason Alexander, as Barry, serves up a variation one his ‘Seinfeld’ character, and Mary Testa is a little too over the top as the mother, but Sherie Rene Scott steals the show as Atalanta, and Pico Alexander (Freddy) and Aimee Carerro (Patty) are almost as amusing. If you are tired of play after depressing play and want just to have a good time and laugh your head off, ‘The Portuguese Kid’ is for you.” Full Review

The Signature Project
East Village
The Playfixer

"A brilliant monologue by an Irish artist named Dunning, who has been traveling around the U.S. with an incredible painting incorporating hundreds of thousands of signatures, using the color spectrum we can see and all the rest of the spectrum we can't. When he shines an ultraviolet and ultrared light on it, we see amazing things...There is also Irish dancing and songs by his brother, who appears via skype...One of the most amazing things I have seen in quite a while." Full Review

Good for Otto
Midtown W
The Playfixer

"While there is not much in the way of plot, the various character threads are very compelling, and there are wonderful performances by the likes of Abraham, Esterman and, especially, Linn-Baker...and, as you might expect, Harris and Madigan are superb." Full Review

Babette’s Feast
Midtown W
The Playfixer

"Conrood has employed a very inventive non-realistic approach, in which the actors mime the props and play both male and female roles, in Botez' all-black costumes, which look Jacobean, giving the town the look of a place that time forgot...The actors are all superb, particularly Hurst, who invests Babette with a quiet dignity." Full Review

Shadowlands
Midtown W
The Playfixer

“I saw the original Broadway production...and I had my doubts as to whether the cast of the Off Broadway revival could come close...Happily, the leads at the Acorn do come close in this superb production...Scott-Reed’s direction is top notch, and her supporting cast the same. The settings by Tighe are ingenious and absolutely gorgeous, as is Spivey’s lighting...Of the 10 plays I saw last week, ‘Shadowlands’ was by far the best.” Full Review

The Playfixer

“Priestley’s ‘Time and the Conways’, last seen on Broadway in the late 1930s, is being given a splendid revival by Roundabout, directed by Taichman, starring McGovern as the matriarch of a well-to-do British family. Priestley employed what was then a novel structure. The first act takes place in 1919 at a birthday party...The second act takes place 19 years later, and nobody’s life has turned out well...Taichman’s cast is superb. This one is a don’t-miss.” Full Review

The Playfixer

“You might remember Stanley Kubrick’s film...A chilling depiction of totally amoral youths who call themselves ‘Droogs’...In the film, the Droogs’ victims are played by other actors; here, the actors playing the Droogs also play their victims, which undercuts the shock of what the Droogs inflict on them, making the play seem more or less like silly game-playing. That said, Spencer-Jones’ highly choreographed production is sensational, as is British actor Davies as Alex.” Full Review

The Last Match
Midtown W
The Playfixer

“In Ziegler’s ‘The Last Match’ two tennis stars go head to head in a quarterfinals match at the U.S. Open...Much of the play consists of these guys' thoughts during their volleys, which are ingeniously staged by Upchurch, interspersed with off-court scenes with their women...All four actors are superb, the guys absolutely believable as tennis players, the women compelling and often poignant...I thoroughly enjoyed this play and think you will too.” Full Review