LindaAnn Lo Schiavo

About:  Native New Yorker LindaAnn Lo Schiavo is a dramatist, critic, and a screenwriter. Currently, she is completing her second documentary film about Texas Guinan.
Reviews (9)
L'idea Magazine

"Judging by the applause at Theatre 71, this bold stroke succeeded with members of the audience, some of whom were perhaps meeting Pirandello for the first time...The show-stopping moment when the 'six characters' interrupt a rehearsal of 'Chee-Chee,' advancing onto the set from backstage, looking almost as morbidly attired as the Addams Family, was wonderfully executed and memorable...Alas, the cast’s ability was uneven...Some puzzling choices popped up." Full Review

Or Current Resident
East Village
L'idea Magazine

"It's frustrating that this play never starts nor illuminates how 'gentrification sucks'. No protagonist is compelling enough to care about. And it's hard to maintain interest in a dilemma - even a potential eviction - that the playwright herself is not sufficiently focused on...Suffers from a profound lack of cohesiveness, dramatic imagination, and theatricality. It's a chaotic mix of mystifying sub-plots, exasperating narration, and a gentrification plot that only resurfaces now and then." Full Review

To Damascus Part II
East Village
L'idea Magazine

"Strindberg’s text can be insufferably convoluted, carelessly implausible, and often overbearing in its lessons about personal redemption. Greer tries to keep the audience awake with quick, efficient pacing, and sharp moments of humor...But the play inherently lacks drama—the dramatic conflict that arrests our attention and makes us invest ourselves in the outcome is spread too thin during two hours." Full Review

Half Moon Bay (Nylon)
West Village
L'idea Magazine

"Jean Goto is excellent as Pam, the wronged wife, and the most physically free of all the characters....Ben Gougeon is stiff in his role as the obsessed lover and lacks clout where he needs it most — in every 'turning point' moment with Alicia. Director Margarett Perry keeps the play moving briskly in this minimalistic staging...John Jiler has written wonderfully poetic dialogue and several lines stay with you." Full Review

Believers
Midtown W
L'idea Magazine

"'Believers' feels like a work-in-progress that is hinting at something that could carry intellectual weight and a stronger emotional charge. Though the situation intrigues, the characters are too insubstantial and far too agreeable to keep our interest. The dialogue, though sometimes clever, is anemic and the crucial questions about faith and believing are merely waltzed around." Full Review

L'idea Magazine

"Some of the visuals work much better than others...Yes, certain effects here are arresting, well-conceived, and heart-breaking...But what does 'There’s Blood at the Wedding' have in common with Lorca’s 1932 tragedy 'Bodas de Sangre'? Not much...Taken all together, these near-misses illustrate the hazards of justifying what might sound amazing on a grant application versus the challenge of presenting it successfully to a live audience." Full Review

Storage Locker
East Village
L'idea Magazine

"Though the stage looks as drab, dirty, and cluttered as the city dump, tension builds from the start and never lets up...The ensemble cast is very good in bringing this desperation to life...Julián Mesri directs with a sure hand, maximizing the claustrophobic set by his clever use of other areas of the space, such as the sound booth, and his addition of multi-media. A solid job all around." Full Review

L'idea Magazine

for a previous production "Campiness flattens the narrative, denaturing both the darker elements of abuse and isolation as well as the lighter enchanting elements…When the surface story has been preserved but not its soul, the very reason why we go to the theatre is lost. Over two hours of exuberant spectacle is insufficient when the heart of this folktale is brittle as glass...In 'Cinderella' the sum of its parts did not add up to a rousing whole." Full Review

Comes a Faery
West Village
L'idea Magazine

"It is obvious Seaneen’s intentions are not honorable even though his endgame is not immediately clear. And when he does spell it out, at the finale, he actually makes it a little too explicit...Director Shaun Peknic pushes Siobhan and Seaneen to aerobic exhaustion. Between their exuberance and the demands of their dangerous pas de deux, they are a hard act to follow. Unfortunately, the others in the household, Katie and Rafael, lack agency and don’t hold our interest." Full Review