Loren Noveck

Loren Noveck is a critic with Exeunt Magazine. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (80)
Becky Nurse of Salem
Upper W Side
Exeunt Magazine

"In the face of all of the problems facing this family, facing America, I don’t know if any of this will be enough, but I will cling to the hope nonetheless." Full Review

Only Gold
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

" 'Only Gold' is polished and charming and thoroughly enjoyable, and the dancing is killer. That’s more than enough." Full Review

My Broken Language
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"Every aspiring writer should have that moment, and this play may give that to others–or give them the tools to figure out how to build their own. In that mission, it earns its keep." Full Review

Marie It's Time
Soho/Tribeca
Exeunt Magazine

"The end of the play allows for the possibility of something else, something that if it’s not quite a happy ending, then at least one that allows for the possibility of contentment." Full Review

Bodies They Ritual
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

"But as excellent as the production is, it’s the small details in the script, the fully alive characters that Hanks has created, that stick with me: The class anxieties of a single Black mother whose daughter’s success makes her feel ashamed and whose daughter’s childlessness makes her feel unneeded." Full Review

Snow in Midsummer
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

"There’s an ongoing lament through 'Snow in Midsummer' that all the living plants of the town have dried up and crumbled in the drought. But the production as a whole still feels a little like a forest choked with underbrush–the trees are strong and powerful, but it’s hard to see them." Full Review

Fat Ham
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

"James Ijames’s 'Fat Ham' distills the quintessence of Hamlet into a young Black queer Southern man singing karaoke to Radiohead’s 'Creep' at a backyard wedding barbecue, while also infusing Shakespeare’s tragedy with raucous comedy and (spoiler alert) a parting shot of propulsive, disruptive joy. " Full Review

Wedding Band
Brooklyn
Exeunt Magazine

"The particular resonance of this play lies in in its fractal structure, the way that the patterns of the individual relationships mirror the patterns in society at large; each character is a stand-in for a larger dynamic and each encounter is a small example of a larger story in this historical moment poised halfway between Reconstruction and the civil rights movement." Full Review

What You Are Now
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"It’s most successful when Chanse stops trying to explain the infrastructure behind what her characters think and feel; the more its characters describe scientific concepts and the psychological value of survivor testimony and the physiology of fear, the drier and the less grounded in human relationships and human experience the play becomes. And there is a deep well of human experience, of a family’s story, at the heart here–there’s just not enough of that heart in the play." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"Strong’s talent as a performer and comedian lies in the subtle edge underneath a warm, girl-next-door normalcy, and director Leigh Silverman has wisely leaned in to this. Strong’s Trudy isn’t spikily crazy, and her characters in general are friendlier, less weird, and often more relatable than they seem on the page or as played by Tomlin. The downside is that the characters tend to blend together a bit (also partly due to the excision of a lot of detail from the script), which loses some of ... Full Review

Preparedness
Soho/Tribeca
Exeunt Magazine

"An incisive, if not groundbreaking, black comedy about workplace violence and robot cats." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"Intriguingly intricate but ultimately not entirely satisfying, the script is trying to do something really difficult...It’s never easy to create a play of ideas and also yoke them to characters and a story that propels itself forward. Harder still, of course, when you’re trying to serve three stories at once, in the service of one set of ideas. As the second half of the play picks up steam, it almost all comes together, but the film narrative still weighs down the piece." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"The Tate family’s rundown farmhouse kitchen...Suspended as if trapped mid-explosion...Its a stunning effect, but it has the side effect of foreshadowing both theme and plot in a way that makes the play grimmer and more frightening, layering even its moments of dark humor with ever-present existential dread...Kinney’s production does capture well Shepard’s characteristic oscillation between hyper-real physicality and archetypal elements in the plot and characters." Full Review

Fruiting Bodies
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

“A project that hasn’t quite figured itself out yet; neither Sam Chanse’s script nor Shelley Butler’s direction ever quite lands on a consistent aesthetic or tone...At its core, the play is a gentle, largely conventional family drama...But Chanse adds a bunch of additional layers, not entirely successfully: The play dances around all kinds of big ideas - but the ideas are mostly draped over the top of plot elements rather than feeling intrinsic to the characters.” Full Review

White Noise
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

"Parks’s gift (helped by Oskar Eustis’s patience and clarity as a director, which lets every line be heard, and excellent performances) is to fill her language with that duality; sentences and even monologues that should by all rights be be painful, didactic exposition instead slowly, seethingly click together. (Yeah, there’s the occasional spot where one layer too many tips the scale of a moment, but surprisingly few.)...Diggs and Sadoski are both revelatory." Full Review

The Cake
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

“The play often feels like it’s patting comfortably liberal NYC theatergoers on the back for trying to understand the white working class/the Bible Belt/the Trump voter, while wrapping that examination in a sunny comedy that comes awfully close to asserting a moral equivalence, or at least an equal level of absurdity, between believing homosexuality is a sin and not eating cake...Meadow’s direction is fairly static and uninspired." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

“’Fabulation’ is more successful with its mordant social comedy than with its wispy romantic subplot, but director Lileana Blain-Cruz and a stellar cast find moment after moment that shines...Undine sometimes falters as a character...her gradual opening up to the aspiring fireman she meets in drug counseling doesn’t feel entirely earned...Still, the individual scenes are brilliant little comic snapshots. And the minor characters all spring to life with vividness and indelible performances.” Full Review

The Hard Problem
Upper W Side
Exeunt Magazine

“Despite the amount of science and philosophy crammed into a short play, the tone remains light and bracing, thanks to the quality of...O’Brien’s production, buoyed by a roster of excellent performances...Its characters may sometimes come close to being mere positions in a debate, but the overall shape of the project is nonetheless beautiful." Full Review

Natural Shocks
Upper W Side
Exeunt Magazine

“The character Armand is given to play doesn’t make any sense, because Gunderson is withholding everything significant about her and her story almost the entire time; it’s no wonder she sometimes seemed to lose her place. There are all kinds of ways to build suspense, to twist plots and lay clues for an audience to put together later. But there’s a line where impressive sleight of hand tips over into outright betrayal of the audience’s faith—and 'Natural Shocks' crosses it." Full Review

Black Light
West Village
Exeunt Magazine

"The show is a broadly spiritual, intimate, and inviting cabaret that nonetheless holds a core of steely anger forged from a historical legacy of violence. Jomama is immensely charming—a commanding physical presence...with a confiding tone in her silky speaking voice and remarkable control in her singing vocal range...Jomama’s very presence is a tonic for embattled spirits and frayed nerves, and it’s a pleasure to spend an evening with her." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

“A depressingly relevant play about the necessity, the impossibility, and the complexity of ethical, unbiased journalism...The overall mood...in both Wing’s excellent translation...and Evans’s stripped-down direction, is a clear-eyed insistence on recognizing and recording...A Brechtian-style alienation effect that feels well suited to the play’s tone...The quietness and restraint of both writing and performances only underscore the horror and the urgency of the subject matter.” Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"'Manufacturing Mischief' casts a sardonic, skeptical, and often scathing eye on our current political and technological moment. It crams an extraordinary amount of commentary into a brief show–sometimes it whizzes by too fast to catch–but when it works, it’s bracing, thought-provoking, and sometimes hilarious...Reyes’s puppet construction makes the real figures delightfully recognizable...It raises some important ideas, though doesn’t fully explore any of them." Full Review

Dance Nation
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"The little moments where 'Dance Nation' captures adolescence beautifully are strong and achingly poignant...But the play doesn’t succeed in either striking an emotionally realistic tone or using its stylization to generate insight, and the characters didn’t feel whole to me. And for a play about power and competition, it often feels physically timid; I wish Barron and Evans had found a more compelling way to stage the compelling questions 'Dance Nation' raises." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production “‘Pay No Attention’ founders as often as it succeeds...Roles are assigned for the most part by gender...It feels like a missed opportunity not to play more directly with the gender issues highlighted in the stories...The most effective sections were the most straight-up storytelling...Stabs at different styles and techniques–clearly scripted stumbles and verbal slips; movement sequences with over bright, overloud pop music; the occasional song–didn’t connect as well with me.” Full Review

Harry Clarke
West Village
Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production “As a piece of psychology, I’m not sure it hangs together. As a piece of writing, there’s not a lot new here, although Cale and Crudup bring plenty of gusto and plenty of brash sexiness to a somewhat familiar story. But as a character study and a piece of acting, it’s enormously fun, with dizzying layers when Crudup is playing Philip being Harry recounting Mark mimicking his sister or mother. Cale and Crudup have nailed the speech patterns of the Schmidt family...A trifle, but an entertaining... Full Review

KPOP (Broadway)
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"The production numbers bring the house down, but there’s not much else there." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"Here, the whole experience feels more about alienation, about the experience of dislocation—from one’s family, from what you thought you knew about the world, and ultimately from yourself." Full Review

Peerless
Midtown E
Exeunt Magazine

"Park’s script is spare and taut, with not a wasted syllable...The production elements, too, are crisp and striking, in simple, saturated colors." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"What was a lush spectacle in many dimensions is here distilled down to its essence: a man, a rug, and ninety minutes of luxuriating in language." Full Review

Spindle Shuttle Needle
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

"'Spindle Shuttle Needle' uses modern language, modern character sensibilities, and a modern, nonliteral approach to casting to great effect; Reisman and Woodard operate deftly in the gap between one period and the other. ... And the control of tone is very tight—it would be easy for the sharp irony to turn into cheap jokes, but it never does." Full Review

Quince
Brooklyn
Exeunt Magazine

"Yes, 'Quince' goes on a little too long (especially if you’d rather skip out on the dance party at the end, because it’s between the audience and the door). And yes, the script can be a little heavy-handed with exposition, especially via the device of the new priest (and some groaner jokes). But the impression one is left with, sneaking through the dance party to the door, is full of buoyancy, love, and celebration: of heritage, of a milestone birthday, of acceptance." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"The braiding of past and present works remarkably effectively at the end–scenes in the present and the past taking place in the same location, one with Janina and Umut having just found each other and the other with them unable to connect. 'Will you come with me?' becomes the question neither Umut, nor the play, can answer." Full Review

Suffs
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

"Taub and Silverman are trying to do something very nuanced here in engaging with the racial history of the suffragist movement—to use a twenty-first-century, and specifically a post-2020, casting lens throughout, building an ensemble intentionally diverse not only racially but in body type and disability (and of course cross-gender casting all of the male characters), while at the same time, drawing attention to the race of characters and the performers who play them, when it matters to spec... Full Review

Wolf Play
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"Mitchell Winter’s performance anchors the play, especially in his contrasts: between the tentative and abrupt movements of the puppet and the more fluid and energized physicality of the Wolf...One of the key features of the piece is the way that spaces overlay and intertwine with each other...The device feels a little manufactured, especially when both Ryan and Peter are having one-sided dialogues with offstage characters, but also allows for an instant comparison among the ways the differen... Full Review

Cullud Wattah
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

"The play is a shriek of rage about this, a refusal to look away or forget or ignore what has happened and continues to happen in Flint. It’s an act of bearing witness, of acknowledging the horrors that this country is capable of visiting upon its own, especially when those “own” are Black and working-class. It’s a cry of pain, grief–and also guilt–from the American heartland, where a family must face this situation with no recourse and also grapple with their own levels of responsibility, no... Full Review

Dana H. (Broadway)
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"Dana H is unlike anything else I’ve ever seen, and it’s amazingly powerful; it’s shining a light on some extremely dark impulses in humanity and also on Dana’s remarkable grace in her ability to come past that experience with her compassion and her impulses to help others intact." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

“The strikingly clever production, excellently directed by Ken Russ Schmoll, finds a perfect visual idiom to capture the play’s complicated tone, using manipulations of scale to create both deadpan humor and a weird poignancy...There’s a lot going on for a 90-minute play–perhaps too much at times...But these are tiny quibbles... especially given how wonderful the production is: witty, smart, absurdist, but also poignant." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"Troupe and Coats, the strongest actors in the piece give a grounded, pragmatic strength and wryness to characters who could easily seem a little too long-suffering...Max is a hard character...requires a complexity in both acting and staging that Kridakorn and director Jeff Liu never quite seem to get a confident handle on...Kridakorn hits the right tone when playing Max as a desperate striver...The design elements don’t help with the tone, either." Full Review

The Appointment
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

“The balance the show strikes between over-the-top absurdity and stripped-down realism is a tricky one, and though the contrast is part of the point, sometimes it feels like the governing principle is ‘more is better’ when a little more shape might have sharpened the impact. Nonetheless, enormous credit is due to...Steinmetz and the entire ensemble, who switch back and forth between two entirely different genres of performance with crispness and command." Full Review

Hatef**k
Upper W Side
Exeunt Magazine

"The strains of rom com and intellectual rigor...don’t always harmonize, and sometimes the schematics of the philosophical argument trip up the piece as much as the schematics of the romance plot, but it’s bracing and engaging throughout, energized by two strong performers with chemistry to spare...The play’s laser focus is both weakness and strength...The absence of exposition is bright and refreshing, but we end up knowing almost nothing about these people." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

"A surprisingly solid 'Vanya'...Director Morgan Green and the ensemble...find a slightly manic rhythm that brings out the wry comedy...The doubling and the retreading of lines does feel very Chekhovian, I’m not sure it actually illuminates the play in a meaningful way...As a jigsaw puzzle of Chekhov, it’s charming, witty, and even oddly moving. But it feels like 'Minor Character' wants to be more than creditable Chekhov, and it never quite rose to that level for me." Full Review

Noura
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"The deep irony of 'Noura' is that...Noura still can’t find a place in the world to be free of shame and of secrets, and where other people’s ideas of her don’t shape her identity. Her new life is physically safer than the old, but doesn’t allow her to find a sense of self...Raffo is a luminous performer; we feel every thought that crosses Noura’s mind, and Raffo has the flexibility and complexity to make Noura both abrasive and vulnerable, and her struggle both frustrating and moving." Full Review

Wild Goose Dreams
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

"I’m not sure the play could possibly succeed at all the things it’s trying to do, and in the end I think it sometimes leans on its structural complexity at the expense of a fully realized emotional landscape...But there’s still so many things to enjoy, ruminate on, appreciate, and startle at. 'Wild Goose Dreams' is worth seeing for its innovative approach to our twenty-first-century identities and its dreamscapes even if it doesn’t catch all the balls it throws into the air." Full Review

Fireflies
Chelsea
Exeunt Magazine

“Lewis and Wise burn brightly, matching well in their depictions of two vibrant, intensely physical people who do feel genuinely for each other but are also unable to be fully honest...In its portrayal of the larger world in which Charles and Olivia exist... ‘Fireflies’ feels rote and unevolved, lacking all the nuance of the relationship between them...It’s a credit to Love, Ali, and Wise’s rich performance that ‘Fireflies’ never loses sight of her journey and struggle." Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production “'What the Constitution Means to Me,' slightly unwieldy creature that it is, hit me with exquisite timeliness in this historical micro-moment One strength of the show is the way in which it wraps a sophisticated argument...around a nuanced look at exactly the ways in which women grapple with the fear of not being safe in their bodily integrity or protected by the law...The show—like America right now—blends the personal and the political in ways that are as inextricable." Full Review

Fire in Dreamland
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

“Never seems to find firm footing...Characters feel shallowly unpleasant rather than compellingly flawed. And its story never feels fleshed-out...There is something intriguing, if underdeveloped, in the ideas underpinning ‘Fire in Dreamland’...I don’t think the play successfully builds these ideas into a compelling whole, even though many of the production and all of the performances, are wonderful." Full Review

Assembled Identity
Soho/Tribeca
Exeunt Magazine

"'Assembled Identity' is a marvelous piece of craft, using all the tools of modern theater in supple and inventive ways...Director/co-creator Kristin Marting integrates found text with original story smoothly, and has done strong work with the actors...But while the ideas underlying the piece are intriguing and important, I often found myself wishing the complexity and richness of the text and the characters lived up to the excellence of the production." Full Review

Travesties
Midtown W
Exeunt Magazine

"Layers deep in literary and historical references both overt and opaque, theatrically inventive, playing with constructs of narrative and storytelling, slipping in and out of time, posing intense philosophical questions about the nature of art and the meaning of life-and...side-splittingly funny...Quick pacing and deft touch with the exposition. Though if you have no preexisting knowledge of the period...You'll get quite a history lesson but may miss some of the layers in the jokes." Full Review

Dutch Masters
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

"Tightly structured by Keller and beautifully directed by Holland...The source of their emotional bond gradually unfolds to become the heart of the play...The first half of the play unfolds almost like a mystery story...Every time you think you have a handle on it, another piece of data emerges and shifts the frame...The whole thing snaps into place. Everything you’ve seen before make perfect sense, and the whole scope of the play becomes both larger and more intimate." Full Review

Uncommon Sense
East Village
Exeunt Magazine

“An exceptional piece of theatrical craft, with strong performances across the board and every element of design working in harmony with Paris’s staging...In paying attention to the differences among the characters with autism and their connections with others, rather than their isolation and difference from neuro typical people, ‘Uncommon Sense’ brings welcome complexity to the dialogue, and does so with elegant theatricality.” Full Review