Marcus Scott

Marcus Scott is a critic with Edge New York. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (13)
40
Edge New York

"One of the most wildly uneven outings in recent memory...Parks's incendiary drama receives a lobotomized and cryogenic revival...It gets worse...And by worse, I mean structure, logic, theatricality, and entertainment take a hit...The sexual politics and power play within it seem to be remnants from the ash heap of second-wave feminism; the author's dated animus signifying the play's shortcomings." Full Review

80
Edge New York

"This rarely produced political work has maintained its razor-sharp ferociousness while highlighting Parks' adverse fearlessness as an artist. Delphic, opaque, speculative, mystifying and oracular, the ensemble show is at once fundamentally perplexing and emotionally overpowering…Enigmatic and even stupefying at bouts one thing is certain...Signature's latest revival of ‘The Death of the Last Black Man' is a cathartic fever dream of transgressive art." Full Review

80
Edge New York

"With 'Vietgone,' Nguyen manages to address the multifaceted experiences of being an Asian American but also successfully subvert casting traditions and the argot stereotypically associated with Asian culture as far as the U.S. is concerned...'Vietgone' falls short with its minimalist musical score...Irrespective, with a talented cast of entertainers with comic gold chops, 'Vietgone' remains a poignant, touching, waggish and even awe-inspiring love letter to America's global village." Full Review

75
Edge New York

"The play falls into the type of psychodrama that befalls a lot of plays with religious overtones, and at times, even heads towards Tyler Perry territory with some of the reveals in the second act. Oddly enough, this is where this oddly uneven play is quickened...The fathoms in which Rashad goes through in coloring the complexity of this put-upon elderly woman is the stuff of magic...It is this high-spirited performance that rescues an otherwise wayward play." Full Review

80
Edge New York

"Director Kwame Kwei-Armah creates a fantastical, free-wheeling, free-falling, unpretentious chain reaction wind-up production full of delight and delirium. However, the British playwright-director rarely allows the actors to truly milk some of the more beautiful and languid of monologues; it also doesn't help that the three hour epic was sliced-and-diced in half...Full of verve and vision, 'The Comedy of Errors' is not only a laughing matter, it insists on having the last laugh." Full Review

95
Edge New York

"O'Hara's eye-popping, meta-theatrical, reality-TV-for-the-auditorium, kitchen sink drama - under the innovative directorial vision of Kent Gash - could be a taste of where theater is going; It taps into today's bizarro zeitgeist and really pushes a insurrectionary mirror echo back in our faces. O'Hara's script gives way to the spectacular cast to fan the fires of an atomic blast of a second act...Self-invention, intervention, exploitation and raw ambition stew below this riotously funny dome... Full Review

90
Broadway Blog

"Within 65 minutes, Assadourian zeroes in on the epicenter of incarceration with stanch sensitivity and empathy without a tinge of melodrama...This unique yarn feels like an intimate cabaret mash-up of '12 Angry Men' and 'Orange Is The New Black' for the 'Law and Order' generation, but with surprising entail and wit." Full Review

85
Edge New York

"'The View UpStairs' is a quintessential star-spangled civil rights kiss-off; it may also be the first great post-Trump musical of the 21st century...The show is revelatory...This production is not perfect...Some jokes also do not land...There are moments where the audience has to wait too long for the build up...Make no mistake however, as a show, 'The View UpStairs' has all of the ingredients for an iconic cult phenomenon." Full Review

90
Edge New York

for a previous production "The relentlessly authentic production brings to mind earlier work of the playwright…However, Nottage's working class drama is a revelation because of its anima. This is a play that demands itself to unearth the meaning and the stigma of disenfranchisement...Having won the 2016 Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, do not be surprised if 'Sweat' is shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize next year." Full Review

35
Edge New York

"The characters in Washburn's play are merely cardboard cutouts with a few proficiencies superimposed to create a far-reaching, higgledy-piggledy narrative reduced to senseless minutiae. The result is a blasé high art affair spiked with idiosyncratic poetry and a narrative that baffles and exasperates, mostly because most of the more interesting components take place offstage and are narrated via pre-recorded tape." Full Review

85
Edge New York

"With little to draw upon, Gavigan produces a warm and heartfelt performance, especially with a jaw-dropping last-ditch plot twist that could polarize skeptics...But neither Gavigan nor Epstein holds a candle to Thomas E. Sullivan now making his off-Broadway debut...Canny, cringe-worthy, and yet discerning, with a hint of shrewd mischief, this 90-minute production achieves what some of the best theater aims for, pondering the profound and without providing any straight resolutions." Full Review

65
Edge New York

"This strong newly minted production directed lethargically by a misguided Jeffrey B. Moss, benefits mostly because spectators are treated with plentiful previously unreleased before-heard trunk songs and revised tunes from the Bock & Harnick catalogue, all of which hold up today...While the first twenty minutes drag on, when we finally settle in, gravitas and ethos hit hard." Full Review

85
Edge New York

for a previous production "It's a familiar tale, really, with Olde English rhetoric and a charming, Technicolor narrative full of rose-tinted happy-ever-afters, and with Butler's strategic direction, the laughs hit and the drama boils like scalding syrup. The ending is predictable upon the first scene, but Korn delights the audience with Golden Age staging...Deliciously droll, 'Delirium's Daughters' is the anthemia of comic confection with an antediluvian spirit and traditional allure for the whole family to relish." Full Review