Mark Fisher

New York City

Mark Fisher is a critic with The Guardian (UK). This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (10)
The Prisoner
Brooklyn
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production “Although philosophically provocative, a man spending two decades on a barren plain is dramatically inert...The clarity and control that characterised Brook’s best work...is only a few short steps from banality when the material is this thin...To deal with a story that is more meditative than dramatic, Brook and Estienne treat it like a fairy tale...They give it the archetypal quality of a parable, but not the profundity it seems to be searching for.” Full Review

Black Beauty
Midtown W
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "A triumph of object-theatre stagecraft, it takes a rosette-worthy canter through a stableful of horse-themed gags, while paying touching testament to the value of resilience...The approach provides a narrative frame for the episodic tales, while offering a jokey point of contrast to Sewell’s high drama of burning barns and animal cruelty...It’s as beguiling as it is funny, and if your heart’s never gone out to a fallen welly, this is the show for you." Full Review

Helen Lawrence
Brooklyn
The Scotsman

for a previous production "Flashy but flawed...The show is a technically impressive fusion of live performance and projected images...So far so clever, but it’s as if Douglas developed the technique then went in search of a story to justify it...The production leaves us between two stools. As a piece of theatre, it offers little human insight or thematic exploration, still less any sense of being in the same room as the actors – it’s just a series of events, snappily told but without depth or purpose. As a piece of fi... Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "Justin Young's three-hander looks as though it's going to be another sentimental play about dementia, but it turns out to be a good deal more sophisticated. "In My Father's Words" is about memory, identity, sacrifice, and the near impossibility of true communication...The play mirrors Hollywood's obsession with ambitious sons and dysfunctional fathers. But the author has richer things to say about the trauma of cultural separation and the irreplaceable poetry of dead and minority languages." Full Review

Variety

for a previous production "This tender one-man portrait of a transsexual woman trying in vain to earn her father’s acceptance is an authoritative, humane and brave performance that quietly challenges the perceptions of a mainstream aud...The gulf of misunderstanding between the generations and the duo’s inability to retie the bonds of parent-child love have universal resonance. The poignancy of Darley’s script lies as much in this as it does in its liberal plea for tolerating people as they want to be." Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production “Ley’s funny new play celebrating the Edinburgh bookshop that was a lifeline for the gay community...A love song to a moment in time...Philips’s production is sparky and good-humoured, Reid and McVarish showing sharp comic timing as they resist the cliche of the tragic gay narrative arc and the equally predictable gay love story. As a play, it is modest in its scope, but it claims a piece of recent history with zest, compassion, and due reverence to the power of the printed word.” Full Review

887
Brooklyn
Variety

for a previous production "There’s a theme bubbling beneath the surface about class and opportunity, and the suggestion that the great movements of history were determined by injustice and inequality. Lepage continues to develop his work beyond opening night and he may yet find more mileage in the story of his grandmother, whose memory loss chimes with the themes of '887' but doesn’t fully connect. That, though, is a minor niggle in a work that delights, mesmerizes and provokes." Full Review

Helen Lawrence
Brooklyn
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "Perhaps you're a fan of the theatre. What you like is the moment-by-moment thrill of seeing actors perform and a story unfolding in your imagination. Or maybe you're more of a movie buff. You prefer to be immersed in a cinematic dream. Either way, you'll be frustrated by 'Helen Lawrence', a multimedia hybrid from Canadian Stage that is expensive, hollow and neither one thing nor the other...'Helen Lawrence' is too flimsy to satisfy as either theatre or film." Full Review

39 Steps
Gramercy
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "We laugh at theatre's inability to create realistic impressions of a steam train, a Highland landscape and the Forth bridge; and we laugh, too, at the playfulness of a production that persists in the attempt regardless...It's a witty, high-energy show". Full Review

Variety

for a previous production "Delivered with sensitivity and precision, it is a performance as stripped back and elemental as Pinter's language, delivered to an aud happy to savor the British actor's every word...As celebrations go, it is an austere, ascetic and restrained performance, one that captures the pugnacity, precision and a little of the dry humor of an exacting writer." Full Review