Mark Lawson

Mark Lawson is a critic with The Guardian (UK). This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (20)
King Lear (London)
Southwark
The Guardian (UK)

Hunter takes her place, with Derek Jacobi, Ian McKellen, Paul Scofield (on film), and Glenda Jackson among the Lears seared in my mind. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

This is Hare’s most dramatically gripping and politically thoughtful play since The Absence of War three decades ago and provides another acting triumph for Fiennes... Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

[The] playwright should be encouraged to aim bigger to fulfil the potential of a play that feels like sketches for the epic political drama he could write. Full Review

Old Bridge
Shepherds Bush
The Guardian (UK)

The performance exposes problems with the script. The biggest ... is imbalance between narration and dramatisation. With strong jokes and jolts, Memic shows high promise but next time needs to go deeper and clearer from his jumping-off point. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

John Heffernan rawly embodies the lurches between memories of past closeness and the chasm of cold absence that grief’s derangement brings. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Reviving her 2016 production, Indhu Rubasingham excels in her directorial signatures of pacy staging combined with clarity of narrative and characterisation. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Shaw’s one-act pieces How He Lied to Her Husband (1904), a farce about adultery in literary circles, and Overruled (1912), a comedy of polygamy, are here delightfully revived by Shavian specialist director Paul Miller. Full Review

Endgame
Southwark
The Guardian (UK)

Radcliffe and Cumming achieve the Beckett paradox of exhilarating bleakness...Deftly bringing out the humour in Samuel Beckett’s lines, the two actors bring fresh life to a tale of imminent doom.' Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production The finest collection of vintage gags on the London stage should allow the show to make a fair amount of what Del Boy calls “lovely jubbly”. But, as a musical, a few too many of the songs are, to borrow again from the Trotter lingo, plonkers. Full Review

Burning Doors
East Village
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production “The play becomes increasingly dependent on passages of charade, gymnastics, and acrobatics…But while reduction to dumbness is initially a resonant metaphor in a piece about censorship, the wordlessness is so prolonged that it becomes progressively less eloquent. At its strongest, the show suggests Pinter resurrected in Minsk. At its weakest, it feels like an uneasy attempt to stage an armistice between the opposing forces of text-based and physical theatre.” Full Review

Anyone Can Whistle (London)
Elephant and Castle
The Guardian (UK)

Somehow accomplishing 'Simple' and other busy songs on a thin strip of stage, Georgie Rankcom’s production brilliantly gives the show new contexts. Full Review

The 4th Country
Finsbury Park
The Guardian (UK)

Interweaving triple narratives of lovers, siblings and soldiers doesn’t give enough space to explore the complexities of British rule...the play’s own tone is too diffuse and confused. Full Review

Best of Enemies
Southwark
The Guardian (UK)

Graham proves that he stands with [Aaron] Sorkin as our best dramatic interpreters of the interplay of media and politics. Full Review

Mum
Soho
The Guardian (UK)

Lloyd Malcolm daringly switches tone, from comic to manic, and jumbles time, so that, in Abigail Graham’s unnerving staging, we would be wary of swearing to events in court. Though only 60 minutes, the play is, dramatically and sociologically, a power hour. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Though finishing in the 1950s, Indecent throws shadows beyond ... Parallels may ... be seen with the current cultural conflict over what should be said and by whom. Indecent is a brainy play staged with the panache of a musical. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Director James Haddrell fascinatingly explores the dramatist’s middle distance by bringing together four of the 10 texts collected in a 1990 anthology, Caryl Churchill: Shorts....a celebration of the restless and prolific originality of a great dramatist. Full Review

Love Letters
West End
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production The emotional and physical distance of this epistolary novel for the stage is ideal for Covid-era theatre, performed here with power and finesse. Full Review

Curtains
West End
The Guardian (UK)

Jason Manford is a charming, showtune-obsessed homicide cop in this fun companion to Chicago and Cabaret. Full Review

Fleabag
Soho/Tribeca
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "'Fleabag' is a rare piece...The live show brings the extra pleasure of watching Waller-Bridge’s skill at goading and controlling the audience. She deliberately kills big laughs with transgressive details that draw appalled gasps or groans. Her physical and expressional versatility is even more impressive in the flesh, as she instantaneously creates charades...The character is a fascinatingly complex creation." Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

“A farce that requires some very complicated comedy staging and acting to go exactly right. It does...The show is thrillingly and daringly inventive...In a gymnastically enthusiastic cast that combines Mischief long-timers with newcomers, Lewis is outstanding...The sillier stretches of dialogue leave the show just short of ‘One Man two Guvnors’...This lung-bustingly funny play is just what the therapist ordered.” Full Review