Matt Wolf

Matt Wolf is a critic with The Telegraph (UK). This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (56)
The Arts Desk

Warchus enveloped a bustling production within the embrace of an audience held rapt at every turn. Composer and arranger Christopher Nightingale (a current Tony Award nominee for his score for this show) merits the highest praise. Full Review

London Theatre

...it’s difficult to imagine a more blue-chip approach than that taken by adapter-director Nicholas Hytner...but the production’s real success...an ability to remint this appeal to the heart so that it honestly and urgently pierces ours.' Full Review

The Arts Desk

That rare performer who can couple hilarity and pathos in a single moment (Greig is absolutely made to order for Chekhov)... Maxine Peake all but yanks the audience to their feet with her giddy, high-octane occupancy...' Full Review

On Blueberry Hill
Westminster
The Arts Desk

Some wondrous acting is sacrificed on the altar of an increasingly wonky plot in On Blueberry Hill, the first play in 10 years from Sebastian Barry, Full Review

A Number
Southwark
The Arts Desk

A dream team dazzles anew. Roger Allam and Colin Morgan refashion Caryl Churchill's contemporary classic... Anyone expecting an exercise in theatrical penance should prepare for no small share of laughs.' Full Review

Leopoldstadt
Covent Garden
The Arts Desk

Stoppard at once personal and accessible...Director Patrick Marber knits Tom Stoppard's putative swan song into a compelling whole Full Review

The Boy Friend
Southwark
The Arts Desk

Fun but featherweight...a sustainedly nostalgic billow of song and dance...comparatively little of consequence happens across three acts.' Full Review

The Arts Desk

breezy but bland...Seasonal entertainment is cheerful if essentially dull Full Review

Groan Ups
Westminster
The Arts Desk

As it is, I winced a fair amount to start with and, after the interval, smiled throughout while even feeling the odd lump in the throat – which is some way from the Mischief Theatre norm. Full Review

Big The Musical
Fitzrovia
The Arts Desk

sweet if wildly overstretched...Onetime Broadway flop has more charm in London but still needs work Full Review

The Arts Desk

Staged as an exercise in storytelling that finds Smith surrounded from the start with a retinue of eager and adoring kids, this really is a production to appeal to our inner child, which is intended as a real compliment... Full Review

The Arts Desk

But what Adrian Mole crucially lacks is any real charm or room to breathe, not to mention a score to lift the audience beyond nostalgia... Full Review

The Arts Desk

Andrew Scott continues his rise and rise...The Irish star is sublimely funny - and moving, too - in Noël Coward classic.' Full Review

The Starry Messenger
Covent Garden
The Arts Desk

Kenneth Lonergan's Off Broadway play trades heavily on deadpan as it crosses the pond. Full Review

Rosmersholm
Charing Cross
The Arts Desk

Either way, the production sweeps you along on, um, currents of energy not always associated with this playwright. In talking up to his audience, Rickson and co with luck may well take the town. Full Review

Downstate
Lambeth
The Arts Desk

Controversial but also clear-eyed and compassionate. Bruce Norris's ever-provocative play puts people first, labels second...beautiful and wounding play... in the production of a writer's dreams.' Full Review

Admissions
Westminster
The Arts Desk

As was true when it was premiered at Lincoln Center Theatre last spring, the play packs a genuine wallop well before coming to rest on the ironic final word, "perfect". Full Review

Girls & Boys
West Village
The New York Times

for a previous production "Mulligan’s unnamed character is dryly funny on any number of topics...Kelly dresses up his narrative in ways that detract from its power, like some overzealous puppeteer...If the play overreaches for effect, there’s no trace of the sensational in Mulligan’s performance, which is accompanied by a playfulness and quick-wittedness that bypass the gathering thesis-mongering of the final passages." Full Review

Young Frankenstein
Charing Cross
The Arts Desk

For once, I really did laugh until I cried, not least in amazement that so unapologetically bawdy, lowdown a romp has somewhere along the way acquired a heart. Full Review

42nd Street
Covent Garden
The Arts Desk

Indeed, while memory can be a tricky thing, I'm tempted to think of this as the best 42nd Street in my experience since the fabled Broadway original that I saw as a theatre-mad teen in 1980. Full Review

The Arts Desk

Indeed, the resounding irony across the marathon of more than five hours is that a production so abundant in trickery and stage magic should have such a human pulse. Full Review

The Crucible
Midtown W
The Telegraph (UK)

"This is a topical take on 'The Crucible'...The onetime doyen of the Off Broadway avant-garde seems intent on honouring the spirit of a playwright whose greatness can occasionally come at a ponderous price. There’s no hint of ponderousness here, though, where the air is charged with the chill winds of chaos...No amount of directorial tweaks or innovations would matter without a cast able to transform an often worthy play into one that is properly wounding." Full Review

Therese Raquin
Midtown W
The Telegraph (UK)

"Knightley’s commitment to this latest part is never in doubt…She communicates the sullen intensity of a woman not easily given over to cheer...A body count that begins to rival that of Hamlet but without much in the way of nuanced introspection…The eventual guilt surrounding the couple’s malfeasance is accompanied by enough sound effects to posit the director Evan Cabnet’s production as Broadway’s unexpected answer to 'The Woman in Black.'" Full Review

Radiant Vermin
Midtown E
The New York Times

for a previous production "David Mercatali’s adroit production also feels like a theatrical game, albeit a hugely pointed one...Mr. Ridley casts a sidelong glance at contemporary mores with a satiric finesse worthy of his vaunted former countryman Jonathan Swift...Mr. Ridley has a field day setting the apparent sunniness of his young lovers against their escalating misdeeds in a play that questions whether we are our brother’s keeper or his destroyer." Full Review

The Arts Desk

for a previous production "Stephen Sondheim's ever-elastic masterpiece is downsized to largely dazzling effect in its latest iteration...The environment here is the principal occasion rather more than the two leading performances…Would one want every 'Sweeney Todd' done this way? No, since part of this musical's achievement in full flight has everything to do with its surging wall of sound. But on its own terms, at once revisionist and remarkable, the occasion is indispensable." Full Review

The Arts Desk

We live for now in socially distanced times, but the collective skills of these musicians, not to mention their cast, prove capable of crossing even the most pandemic-intensive divide. Full Review

Nine Lives
Southwark
The Arts Desk

Engaging if slim finale to ambitious solo season...Lladel Bryant communicates a restless, inquiring spirit that won't be ground down...Sparky solo play leaves you wanting yet more.' Full Review

The Arts Desk

...a pitch-perfect Imelda Staunton... Both this monologue ['A Lady of Letters'], and the one that precedes it (Playing Sandwiches, featuring the mighty Lucian Msamati), find Alan Bennett in fearlessly penetrating, ever-darkening mode.' Full Review

The Arts Desk

Pretty Woman won't be the last cynical miscalculation to hit the West End, but if it brings [Bob Harms] to a broader public, well, no harm done there. Full Review

The Arts Desk

Star turn bolsters baggy rewrite...Lesley Manville rises above the prevailing muddle...at its core, the play seems mostly to be running in place.' Full Review

Curtains
Covent Garden
The Arts Desk

When it comes to closing out the West End year on an unanticipated high, Curtains has arrived not a moment too soon: cheers, not sneers, all round. Full Review

The Arts Desk

Energetic but to what end? Jordan Belfort memoirs translate unpleasantly, even unnecessarily, to the stage...' Full Review

Vassa
Camden Town
The Arts Desk

Gorky play suffers an identity crisis in uneasily-pitched revival. Full Review

The Arts Desk

Timelessly moving. Athol Fugard's 1982 self-exorcism is searingly revived...The ever-astonishing Lucian Msamati gives one of the year's best performances.' Full Review

The Arts Desk

Well-intentioned but needs a rewrite...the cast's commitment to the material is moving to behold, even if the writing itself only intermittently rewards their support.' Full Review

The Arts Desk

smart stagecraft, skimpy script...Melly Still brings her singular theatricality to bestselling novel on stage Full Review

the end of history...
Sloane Square
The Arts Desk

The title promises a political emphasis but instead devolves into the sort of parent-child agon that Philip Larkin might well recognise...raises more questions than it answers.' Full Review

The Arts Desk

A Broadway show as melodically haunting and sophisticated as it is niche... looks good and sounds even better.' Full Review

Orpheus Descending
Southwark
The Arts Desk

Tennessee Williams scorcher needs more firepower...Troubled but tantalising Williams play doesn't entirely land this time around.' Full Review

Betrayal
Midtown W
The New York Times

for a previous production "A Pinter Marathon Saves the Best for Last." Full Review

The Bay at Nice
Southwark
The Arts Desk

David Hare talkfest takes intermittent wing...There's an irony that so densely written a play is most moving once the words fall away.' Full Review

Coming Clean
Westminster
The Arts Desk

Kevin Elyot play has lost the pathos if not the plot...1982 play needs sharpening in this shallow revival of a revival Full Review

The Grinning Man
Westminster
The Arts Desk

Tom Morris's production is a visual delight that needs considerable streamlining and strengthening of tone if it is to amount to more than the musical theatre catch-all that it would seem to be at present. Full Review

Annie
Soho
The Arts Desk

If Annie is in some ways an enduringly safe bet – this isn't a show that would benefit from Donmar-style deconstruction – its strength lies in an open-faced, full-throated compassion... Full Review

The Telegraph (UK)

"This new staging signals the Broadway debut of English director Josie Rourke and marks the first 'Liaisons' in my experience to come anywhere near the power of the original. Its newfound elan is thanks to a sizzling cast led by the sublime Janet McTeer and a bolder take on the piece from Rourke...Rourke allows a period piece to tap into gender wars that are being waged even now while ensuring that this 'Liaisons' feels newly dangerous, indeed." Full Review

Cyprus Avenue
East Village
The New York Times

for a previous production "As genuinely shocking a play as I’ve come across...Don’t worry if you’re not up on the language of Fenians and Loyalists...in which Ireland’s take-no-prisoners writing is steeped...The playwright folds bitterly dark humor into the gatheringly forbidding mix...There is nothing remotely funny, though, about the concluding passages of a play unafraid to posit terrorism itself as a form of psychosis...The abiding chill cast by the play even now is hard to shake." Full Review

The New York Times

for a previous production "'Cruelty,' purrs Janet McTeer, the scintillating epicenter of an unbalanced revival of 'Les Liaisons Dangereuses'...Imposing of stature and sinuous of speech, McTeer lends a flickering allure to Rourke’s production...The play demands equal sparring partners, and there has yet to be a stage 'Liaisons' whose leads have been as beautifully matched as Alan Rickman and Lindsay Duncan...Still, McTeer exerts such a force field that a long evening acquires its own fevered pulse." Full Review

The New York Times

for a previous production "Though the production might appear at the outset to be conventional, don’t be misled. Mike Britton’s richly brocaded costumes may be period-sumptuous, but this ever-problematic play forsakes sartorial pageantry to land with a telling sting in its tail. Suffice it to say that Mr. Munby and his largely expert company understand the difficulty in classifying as comic a play that is so dominated by the vilification of the Jewish moneylender Shylock." Full Review

Antigone (BAM)
Brooklyn
The New York Times

for a previous production "There’s scant cheer — not to mention engagement — to be found in the production of 'Antigone'...A stripped-back, abstract set in the minimalist style, but without the energy required to fire up the current staging’s savage debate between the personal and the political...Mr. van Hove’s attempt to be timeless actually speaks to no time at all. You emerge not dazed and enlightened but glad to get out." Full Review

The Audience
Midtown W
The Telegraph (UK)

"Visually, the director Stephen Daldry’s production remains a marvel...But it’s Mirren’s shrewd yet affectionate portrayal of a monarch-made-flesh that looks poised to take the town, perhaps resulting in this actress’s first-ever Tony Award. 'One by one, your prime ministers will fall under your spell,' the play’s Winston Churchill tells Her Majesty. Expect Broadway playgoers to join the queue." Full Review