Maya Stanton

Maya Stanton is a critic with Entertainment Weekly. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (11)
85
Entertainment Weekly

"Humor abounds in playwright Lucas Hnath’s creative sequel...Metcalf's Nora is a woman who knows her own mind and isn’t afraid to say so. It’s a revelatory performance, rife with physicality and determination...Literary fanfic of the highest caliber, Hnath’s script is an irreverent yet respectful take on the source material...A worthy companion piece to the original, 'A Doll’s House, Part 2' is an imaginative postscript to a well-loved standard." Full Review

90
Entertainment Weekly

"Gold applies an innovative yet back-to-basics take on an old standard, and the result is a stunning, emotionally rending production. It doesn’t hurt that he has stacked the deck with acting talent...The minute Tom delivers his opening narration with the house lights up, it’s obvious that this is a much-needed fresh perspective on the show...Though Gold's vision might not be for everyone, there’s no arguing that it’s a bold, creative one. The rare revival that breathes new life into a classic." Full Review

80
Entertainment Weekly

"Though the madcap first act flies by, the second feels a bit slower, at least until the action ramps back up to its inevitable conclusion. Ives has written a clever script—the decision to stick with verse could have been an annoying conceit, but in his capable hands, it’s an ingenious way to tweak the source material… From the rapid-fire dialogue and the mistaken-identity shenanigans to one sublimely silly duel, Ives’s 'Liar' is a treat—and that’s the truth." Full Review

80
Entertainment Weekly

"The intimate nature of the small amphitheater-style setup lends itself nicely to Greenberg’s storytelling; when Radnor’s character breaks the fourth wall, it feels like a personal appeal...Aaron's infatuation with Joan feels a little forced — their chemistry doesn’t quite support their near-instant attraction. Luckily, that’s not an issue for the rest of the cast...The quiet, funny script resonates with the evergreen themes of community, desire, and self-discovery. It’s a memorable ride." Full Review

90
Entertainment Weekly

"Perhaps because of its length, 'The Shawl' is the more memorable of the two, but both pieces, true to their collective title, are haunting works—superbly acted, and skillfully staged without artifice or extraneous ornamentation by director Scott Zigler. Vividly evocative of that queasy feeling you get in the pit of your stomach when you hear an unsettling tale, 'Ghost Stories' is eerily good theater. " Full Review

80
Entertainment Weekly

"Author Patrick Barlow and director Maria Aitken have created a unique piece of screwball comedy to call their own...This loving sendup is part madcap romance, part mistaken-identity thriller, and pure absurdity...At times, it feels a bit like a backyard production from the neighborhood kids, but Hitchcock himself couldn’t have helped cracking a smile at the self-referential hijinks." Full Review

80
Entertainment Weekly

"The cognitive dissonance between a work of art and a setting that inherently encapsulates the disparities at its heart is a jarring but ultimately effective tool...Director Jones also helmed a 2015 production, and the newly added American actors benefit from his intimate knowledge of the material...Cannavale brings an animalistic physicality to the central role...O’Neill’s cutting critique of American social and economic structures couldn’t be more relevant." Full Review

80
Entertainment Weekly

"The cast recreates scenes from the documentary as their dialogue seamlessly syncs with the film footage displayed on screens around the stage. And the sense of déjà vu is inescapable...To say much more about the play’s unconventional approach might give too much away. Though the subject matter is often infuriating, the performances are engaging and the presentation is fascinating. A challenging but accessible downtown theater experience, this 'Affair' is one to remember." Full Review

90
Entertainment Weekly

"By turns hilarious and devastating, this is an emotionally bruising gem of a play...Wilson’s dialogue captures the cadences of the day in a manner both timely and timeless...The talented cast soars under the confident direction of Tony-winner Ruben Santiago-Hudson...From the stellar performances to the sharp script, 'Jitney' is a substantial piece, and a breath of fresh air to boot." Full Review

70
Entertainment Weekly

"The simple, effective staging only accentuates the location’s natural beauty...Cirque-esque elements lend a modern touch, and though the majority of the costumes are de rigeur, the two slaves’ bondage-evoking harnesses provide a frisson of excitement...Still, these positives aren’t enough to distract from the production’s hollow center, and even with all of the turmoil, it ends up as more of a light shower than a 'Tempest'." Full Review

80
Entertainment Weekly

"It’s powerful source material, but some writing choices leave a bit to be desired—during a heated exchange, should it really be the black character’s responsibility to advocate for peace and understanding, and attempt to teach the gun-wielding white woman the error of her ways?... But the author obviously has good intentions, and under his guidance, the small cast deliver impeccable performances all around." Full Review