Michael Glitz

Michael Glitz is a critic with The Huffington Post. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (75)
95
Pop Surfing

"Directed and acted to quiet perfection, it's a pitch perfect execution of a simple idea...The show is directed by Lila Neugebauer so invisibly that you half believe the audience is sitting behind a one-way mirror and watching an actual focus group...This is an ensemble in every sense of the word and each actor is doing exceptional work. Director Neugebauer works with them and a terrific creative team to create one of the most finely tuned productions I've seen in ages." Full Review

90
The Huffington Post

"A very good play with very good performances and a very good production design and very good direction, all working together to give you that delicious feeling of being in very good hands...The three actors couldn’t be in more sync if they were a string quartet that had spent a lifetime perfecting their focus and interplay...How easy all involved make a fresh, compelling drama like this seem." Full Review

80
The Huffington Post

"A clever way to present the story from a new angle...We get nostalgia, the pleasure of 'live' radio and the spine of the film’s story all at once...The set-up is low-key and winning...Anyone who has ever watched a radio play being performed knows what a treat that is, from observing the simple sound effects to the fun of seeing an actor switch from a little child to an old woman in the blink of an eye and so on...Moore directs the cast with a light touch and they are uniformly strong." Full Review

25
The Huffington Post

“I expected it might be kitschy, silly, or just plain bad but I didn’t expect quite the train wreck I witnessed...YouTube, reality TV, talent shows, and an actual honest to goodness star in Aiello? This show has it all. Obviously, no one involved is going to be touting this show on their CV anytime soon...I did observe some generous spirit on display...Here’s hoping all involved can turn this show into one rueful memory they can laugh about during better times to come.” Full Review

80
The Huffington Post

for a previous production "A happy surprise of a show filled with enjoyable songs, a talented cast and enough energy to let you overlook its natural desire to give everyone a turn in the spotlight...Director and choreographer Castellino does strong work...keeping the show buoyant...The cast has fun but they’re not too broad...A few bits go on too long...A solid production and a clutch of songs I’m eager to hear again. By any measure, that’s a happy ending." Full Review

60
The Huffington Post

"Berger’s amiable, too-soft revival of "The Government Inspector' remains this side of great, despite some strong lead actors and a classic text...An essential tension, the desperation that drives the best comedy is lacking here. Quite simply, the cast is having too much fun...Michael Urie is an appealing center to this storm...Mary Testa is simply too good to ever not be funny...Most everyone else, however, fades into the background." Full Review

85
The Huffington Post

"Here’s the secret to his success: you like him. Brown’s stage persona is thoroughly winning and frankly one can imagine him developing a show without a spot of magic and creating a charming piece anyway. But magic there is here...It’s not Vegas glitzy but his new show plays as pure entertainment, wearing its sophistication lightly. Kudos to Brown’s professional partners, which includes his co-writers Nyman and O’Connor, who also co-direct to create an evening that is sneakily well constructed." Full Review

45
The Huffington Post

"More of an installation than a show...While the sets were perfectly fine in capturing the shabby anonymity of a hotel room from afar, for example, there was literally nothing of note in any drawers or anywhere else. Why encourage people to explore a kitchen when most cabinet doors were glued shut?...Each monologue charted a drab life with a modest twist towards the end that I won’t spoil. They were ably performed but the overall effect was a lot of bother for very little effect." Full Review

45
The Huffington Post

“Awkward and noisy and obvious when it’s not confused…As directed by Trip Cullman it now seems to be about the children of privilege as much as their parents. One struggles to drum up interest in any of them…The marvelous Janney seems perfect to take on the role of Ousia but it still seems haunted a bit by Channing’s bravura turn the first time around...It’s not technology that has dated ‘Six Degrees of Separation.’ It’s time.” Full Review

80
The Huffington Post

"'Pacific Overtures' has always seemed more of an essay than a musical, thoughtful and probing rather than emotionally engaging. Doyle turns that flaw into a virtue...Every element of this 'Pacific Overtures' allows us to savor the individual moments without demanding more than it is ready to offer...Letting the show flow in stately style from start to finish is revelatory, allowing the musical’s real balance to emerge and the focus to remain on the Japanese point of view." Full Review

90
The Huffington Post

"Unquestionably one of the wittiest, sharpest shows of 2017...A great play given a great production...Spiced with just the right dash of modern language, this is a tour de force of ideas as a trailblazer examines the scorched earth she left behind and is asked if it was worth the price...Like any great play of ideas, 'A Doll’s House, Part 2' works precisely because those ideas flow through characters that are deeply human. The cast is excellent." Full Review

65
The Huffington Post

"Beautifully crafted, strongly acted and respectable in every way, yet not as soul-stirring as one would want...So much is tackled that the drama falls by the wayside. 'Indecent' is never uninteresting but it’s more panorama than play. But how beautifully it’s presented!...If 'Indecent' is indecently ambitious, if it wants to share absolutely everything about the fascinating history of an almost forgotten work, well one can only wish more shows were so admirably flawed." Full Review

70
The Huffington Post

"A piece of theater that moves you rather than dares you to figure it out...Here he is now with a new solo show, one that pushes further forward into creating moments of emotion and beauty where the 'trick' or stunt or illusion is not the point. He’s not there yet, but the evening is satisfying on several levels and it’s quietly exciting to see where he’s headed...It’s not a masterful performance yet. He’s a natural at magic but not as yet a natural at stage patter." Full Review

30
The Huffington Post

“Stars Soo and Chanler-Berat can sing very well but you wouldn’t know it from the ungainly melodies they’re asked to tackle…The book is faithful to the movie in every detail except the one that matters: its spirit…They seem to have made the wrong choice at every turn...Soo does not display the star power that this role desperately needs. That’s not quite fair since no one could bring this story as written to life. Still, the charming Chanler-Berat does bring us in more.” Full Review

80
The Huffington Post

“They don’t rethink or reimagine or modernize Coward...They simply do the play very well…With three acts and every opportunity for mugging, it might have grown tiresome. Instead, it’s a treat—thanks to most everyone in the ensemble…Kline cannot be a revelation, of course, not at this stage of his career. But what a treat to see him in such fine form...Kline is matched by Cobie Smulders, who is indeed a revelation in her Broadway debut.” Full Review

40
The Huffington Post

“Is it good? By no means. But it is big and happily boasts a lead actress who with better material might just become a star. The story is over-heated nonsense, but then so is most opera…The sense of the creative team rehashing what worked before in ‘Les Miz’ is palpable...The tunes are almost astonishingly bad from start to finish both in words and music and all the spectacle in the world can’t hide that…Still, spectacle there is, put across by an able cast." Full Review

30
The Huffington Post

"Sadly, everything in this production feels misguided...Seeing 'Picnic' and 'Sheba' back to back does neither show any favors. Their bland similarity is emphasized and lessens whatever impact each might have on their own...One after the other, 'Picnic' and 'Sheba' don’t evince recurring themes but simply feel like the same story done with a mild twist to make it seem new...The casting only emphasizes this...Happily, actors can make hay even with soapy material." Full Review

45
The Huffington Post

“What ‘946: The Amazing Story Of Adolphus Tips’ lacks — almost aggressively — is any sense of time and place…Artistic director Emma Rice has tossed in everything here, including a panto-style of performance entirely at odds with the bittersweet material…A show where most every choice is misguided…They drain away all the drama, nuance and texture of the book…I’d say Kneehigh has lost its way, but in fact it seems more like Kneehigh has been lost for a long time.” Full Review

95
The Huffington Post

"With just a simple approach, every element here feels precise and correct...Ashford is marvelous...She’s so good and so gracious with Gyllenhaal that they really feel like a team up there...Gyllenhaal is excellent, surely acting this role as well as anyone ever has...They connect their two roles so seamlessly that the show has never felt so whole and complete to me, a unified work of perfection...Marries melody and lyrics and intellectual ideas with heartfelt emotion." Full Review

35
The Huffington Post

“A stitched together creation with each part somehow shakily competent but not quite satisfying…Despite a game cast and some solid technical work, neither section of ‘The Light Years’ holds any interest on their own. And cutting back and forth simply underlines that lack of innate drama (or comedy, as the case may be). The technical elements are solid though the play itself can’t quite inspire greatness…The cast does what it can with very thin material.” Full Review

75
The Huffington Post

"I was kind of besotted by the vision of director Arin Arbus, even as I thought perhaps here and there a transition or change in style might have been done better...Anyone who hasn’t seen this show yet–and it’s rarely done–should not waste a moment to see it done with verve and determination...Like any great play, 'Skin' now seems very timely—with its whiff of dishonest politicians and the world spinning out of control, you’d swear it was written last week...Inevitably flawed but fascinating." Full Review

85
The Huffington Post

"None of Wilson’s plays are perfect and 'Jitney' is no exception. Wilson didn’t strive for a perfect, jewel-like clarity. He was about sprawl and humanity...This is a strong ensemble in the capable hands of director Ruben Santiago-Hudson...The Act One finale where Becker and his son Booster confront each other is one of the most magnetic and compelling scenes I’ve witnessed in a long time." Full Review

85
The Huffington Post

"A thoroughly satisfying 'Tempest.' Take your pick on what to admire the most: the joy of seeing a repertory company tackle multiple plays, the insight offered by an all-female cast and what that says about the play at hand, the ever-rich multiplicity of Shakespeare or simply great actors doing great work with a singular focus. It’s all there...This layering of performance and character upon character unlocks new meaning...It’s all delivered by an exceptional cast." Full Review

60
The Huffington Post

"This early (early) work of Chekhov is given a cheeky translation by Upton, tossing in a specific modern setting and a lot of verve...The cast — led by Blanchett in fine form — keys into Upton’s tone and jazzes it up...Director John Crowley keeps things moving apace...Blanchett and Richard Roxburgh have chemistry to burn...It amounts to very little when all is said and done...This is far inferior Chekhov presented with a sense of fun and when you expect so little, that’s quite a relief." Full Review

55
The Huffington Post

"It’s like being in the audience at an old radio show where half the fun is seeing how they do it...But in fact it’s very hard to sustain a 75-minute silent movie with no dialogue...Worse, the show bungles the story line completely in the final third...With such a simple story, the first reaction should not be audience members wondering if they missed something...Happily, watching the cast go through its paces was pleasure enough...They really need to work on their story structure." Full Review

40
The Huffington Post

"Fiasco Theater puts coal in our stocking with a weak tea production of 'Twelfth Night'...There isn’t much that’s positive to say about Fiasco’s show itself...Much of the cast feels uncomfortable with the language...Even in an uninteresting production of 'Twelfth Night' that squanders one of Shakespeare’s great female parts and adds nothing new to the story, a pleasure can be found. And that’s in the charming, commanding, utterly winning performance of Steinfeld as the Fool Feste." Full Review

65
The Huffington Post

"It’s a guaranteed good time for families...But it could so easily have been much better...Act two has better songs, more action and eventually a propulsive rush to the confetti-filled finale. You’ll be smiling when you leave...While the production is handsome, it also has a playground vibe that feels just right...Truly, a lot of songs just kill time...But what a shame and what a show they might have had...I had fun, mostly because the cast was so winning." Full Review

40
The Huffington Post

“The ideas are many, all under-developed and over-used. A voice-over narrator offers some commentary, but this conceit leads nowhere...The play is chopped up and rearranged willy nilly, with certain passages repeated over and over again in a desperate attempt to squeeze some new meaning out of them...They bat the ideas around almost in boredom, not even realizing that their prey is already dead...Here they flop, spectacularly...Bedlam will surely fly again.” Full Review

55
The Huffington Post

for a previous production “An unreliable narrator can be great fun...In this case an unreliable narrator can frustrate you, leaving an audience wondering exactly what was intended and whether or not they should care...Crudup holds the stage in this one-person show with his usual magnetic stage presence, ably shifting through multiple accents and characters with aplomb...Crudup’s mastery of the material is the main drawing card of this ultimately unsatisfying work." Full Review

85
The Huffington Post

"White is—perhaps surprisingly—more vulnerable than Metcalf...Wilhelmi chooses a less razor-sharp and yet more poignant angle on the daughter that Nora left behind...The great Stephen McKinley Henderson—always so likable even when being a scoundrel—makes you wonder why Nora left him at all...A second visit confirms this is a major play that can and will be staged again and again, finding new insights with new cast members and new approaches to the material." Full Review

65
The Huffington Post

“It has a good production design, some strong performances and songs sporting some good melodies…The book is both overly complicated and not specific enough…The corruption story should be cut, eliminating a good half hour from the current two and a half hour show and focusing it more tightly…Raviv is by far the best here, adding immeasurably to the sensitivity and nuance of the show…Admirably ambitious. It may stumble a little, but that’s what happens when you leap forward.” Full Review

90
The Huffington Post

“Effortlessly funny and sad and moving….Somehow all of life’s mystery and horror are contained in what she says though damned if you can put a finger on how Beckett does it…Wiest is a treat, navigating the text with ease, taking you on the almost invisible journey this person is on...What the heck does it all mean? I do know coming out of the theater you don’t really care when it has cast its spell…It’s meaningful and meaningless; pure theater and perhaps anti-theater. In the old style.” Full Review

75
The Huffington Post

"So well acted and presented that it engages you emotionally almost against its better judgement...It’s an enigmatic, dystopian tale delivered with visual panache, an excellent sound design and three performances that breathe life into its mysterious story. If Walsh hadn’t shied away from the compelling plot he put into motion, it might have achieved greatness...Walsh sets up a marvelous dynamic. But the story we want mostly takes place in between the scenes we see." Full Review

65
The Huffington Post

“Subtlety is naturally lost in all the hijinks, but the high spirits come across loud and clear. The staging is simple…Here, little new is unearthed and certain elements are obscured but it’s an enjoyable romp with a game cast. I wasn’t thrilled with Ceci Fernandez’s campy take on Olivia but she grew on me…As dull as Cohen was in romantic mode, he was twice as fun as the live-wire Sir Andrew…I do question the cutting of director Ali.” Full Review

70
The Huffington Post

"The creative team has put a lot of hard work into this musical and it shows...Unfortunately, they couldn’t break with the show’s big final number and denouement, or shake a certain seen-it-before nature endemic to the familiar material...It’s a promising first effort and I dearly hope the creative team of Richard Oberacker and Rob Taylor can bounce back and dive right into another show...Now they need to learn from this and go out and do it again." Full Review

45
The Huffington Post

"They employ every avant-garde trick in the book...Here, I fear, they remained resolutely random and without impact...When these sorts of gambits are done well, you don’t question them—they have a ritualistic power...Instead, all we saw was a mad, silly scramble...The frustrating fact was that when the actual drama hove into view, I was eager to hear more...Despite all the demands and distractions, the cast for the most part acquitted themselves well...An ambitious but confused effort." Full Review

45
The Huffington Post

"Curiously un-involving even as a more refined, sophisticated attempt at a dual biography. It’s more Arden than Rubenstein in style, but neither woman comes out a winner...These two women are sung by two artists in peak form, with their voices perfectly suited to each character and sounding glorious...So why does 'War Paint 'remain so bloodless? No doubt, they left a lot of fun out of it by going highbrow...Yes, they sacrifice much in their personal lives...But it never cuts deep." Full Review

45
The Huffington Post

for a previous production “It’s 'Noises Off’ without the clever bits. Still, one does giggle a little and full credit to actors Lewis, Sayer and Shields for conceiving this show, writing and starring in it...It simply isn’t funny to have sets fall down…You need characters who seem aware of the disaster they’re in and are trying to figure a way out of the mess…All we get are punch lines with no setup…It’s not rooted in anything...Not always, mind you—sometimes real characters of a sort appear, almost as if by accident.” Full Review

65
The Huffington Post

“It’s head-spinningly difficult to imagine pulling off and yet they succeeded with only minor snafus…Where the show falters is in tone and purpose...It fails when bluntly offering up some of the backstories…When the script veers off from the reality of on-set mayhem, it falters even more…When they show everyone working together to make ‘Casablanca,’ the piece works...Pare down the extraneous and this intriguingly complex production could be...a work of art in its own right.” Full Review

80
The Huffington Post

"Hamill had a remarkable and deserved success adapting 'Sense and Sensibility' and she’s done it again here...The direction, the acting, the tech elements all work in concert but above all it’s the canny script of Hamill that shines. She captures the sweep of the novel and its many ideas with spot-on choices...If the evening is more intellectually stimulating than emotionally gripping, ultimately that’s due to the limitations of what Thackeray created in his Punch & Judy of a morality tale." Full Review

30
The Huffington Post

"Sadly, everything in this production feels misguided...Seeing 'Picnic' and 'Sheba' back to back does neither show any favors. Their bland similarity is emphasized and lessens whatever impact each might have on their own...One after the other, 'Picnic' and 'Sheba' don’t evince recurring themes but simply feel like the same story done with a mild twist to make it seem new...The casting only emphasizes this...Happily, actors can make hay even with soapy material." Full Review

35
The Huffington Post

“It’s a stilted work that spells out what should be implied and then does it again and again…I imagine it wasn’t their best night, making this post-opening performance feel more like an early preview. It didn’t help that the direction of Terry Kinney felt particularly flat and random…I truly had trouble understanding each of the characters…None of the actors made much sense of their parts but I have to think the blame lies equally on the play and this staging.” Full Review

25
The Huffington Post

“It seems almost churlish to take apart such a blandly friendly show like ‘Come From Away.’ But bland it is, from the book to the songs to the choreography and pretty much every performance. The inescapable problem is that there is no dramatic story to tell…Any possibilities for tension are mostly ignored…Many of the characters are based on real people but they all feel anonymous.” Full Review

90
The Huffington Post

"The casting of Mantello is a masterstroke and this production is the best I’ve ever seen...This stripped-down presentation has an emotional truthfulness and clarity that turns the play from a showcase for one actress into a work of drama unburdened by Southern floridness. Like glass held up to the light, it’s shot through with intelligence and nuance and is all the more powerful for it. I’ll be comparing all future productions I see to the memory of this one." Full Review

30
The Huffington Post

"Everything about 'Significant Other' is off and deeply confusing...Harmon seems to believe this is a comic drama with something searing to say about the pain of loneliness in the modern world. But because Jordan isn’t just a normal guy with normal hang-ups who is unlucky in love or hasn’t met the right fellow yet, he’s unrelatable...The fault here begins and ends with the playwright...On the bright side, Cullman has honed the cast to fine effect." Full Review

75
The Huffington Post

"Groban is delivering an unassuming, restrained and nuanced performance as an overweight older man burdened by his unhappy life...He soars, but he doesn’t show off...This is an ensemble and he fits in very nicely indeed...The show is mostly a spectacle but it has one especially affecting moment at the climax in which Groban’s Pierre and the socially disgraced Natasha have a meeting of the souls. It’s quiet, lovely, emotional." Full Review

85
The Huffington Post

"A comedy in verse, filled with buoyant plotting, relentless wordplay and just enough gravitas to make it matter. Add in an excellent ensemble, gorgeous costumes, an elegantly simple set and invisible direction by Michael Kahn and you’ve got yourself a very satisfying evening of theater...A solid first act becomes a terrific second act. Elrod is a delight throughout as the truth-telling master-of-ceremonies Cliton. Kelly Hutchinson practically steals the show." Full Review

40
The Huffington Post

"Feels rather disorganized, with interviews playing in your head while you’re remembering where to walk to next, interrupted by brief cursory dealings with the art around you. None of it coheres into anything more than a vaguely intelligent rambling discussion of high-tech surveillance...Yes, it’s a confusing mess, though not a boring one...The experience of jumbling all these ideas while guiding the audience through various steps was not a satisfying one as play or intellectual exercise." Full Review

45
The Huffington Post

for a previous production "Several problems crop up. First, they begin the show by hinting at characters and a situation...Then it’s dropped completely...As the final nail in the coffin, they then have a text read out that banally tells us what we just did and hopes for import...The cast chose to deliver most of their instructions/dialogue in a flat, affectless, style...Ritual can be powerful theater and there’s no need for 'story.' This was a scattershot, unsatisfying first draft, not a fully formed effort." Full Review

70
The Huffington Post

"This warm-hearted story about religious tolerance has the shape of a Shakespearean romance, the insight of a Michael Frayn drama and the soul of a fairy tale. Kulick hasn’t quite woven all these strands into a cohesive evening of theater...But a fine cast and the probing intelligence on display make it an enjoyable one...The acting was slapdash in style...But it was Abraham who dominated, not by dominating but by quietly anchoring the performances of everyone around him." Full Review