Michael Niederman

Michael Niederman is a critic with New York Theatre Review. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (11)
Shakespeare's Will
Soho/Tribeca
New York Theatre Review

"As played by NACL performer, the charming Tannis Kowalchuk, Anne is a warm and loving presence...Over the course of the hour Kowalchuk fully immerses herself into the contradiction that is Anne Hathaway...Under the watchful direction of Mimi McGurl, and accompanied by multi-instrumentalist Rima Fand, Kowalchuk uses all sorts of movement, song, and poetic language to play the multiple characters who inhabit this tale." Full Review

Lou
East Village
New York Theatre Review

"Mieko Gavia's performance of Lou is powerful, brutally intellectual yet almost pathologically afraid of sensuality...The completely game cast investigates different aspects of male privilege, and how even the best intentions are shadowed by this power imbalance...Like many biography plays, the text sometimes suffers from an effort to fit in too many events...'Lou' is a welcome meditation on the true nature of art, philosophy, and the never-ending battle of the sexes." Full Review

Paris!
Brooklyn
New York Theatre Review

"Company XIV’s 'Paris' is an amazing, debaucherous, and ultimately, goddamned sexy telling of the ancient Greek myth the Apple of Love, and the Apple of Discord...Some of the hottest and creative burlesque routines I’ve seen in a long time...You don’t want to know how well they adapt the Greek tale. You want to know if it’s hot. And it is. Dear goddess it is...You want to know if it’s sexy? Yes, the show brought the sex, tumescently so." Full Review

Orwell In America
Midtown E
New York Theatre Review

"Orwell is played by Jamie Horton in a note-perfect portrayal...Orwell was indeed brilliant, and throughout the play we’re given a window into the history of his long and storied relationship with the written word...While all this might be interesting for this English major, the problem here is that it’s not much of a play...Director Peter Hackett does what he can to dramatize these lectures, but at the end of the day the majority of the piece is restricted to situations of one man talking." Full Review

New York Theatre Review

“The challenge is the sheer boredom that comes with a siege...Unfortunately this sense of boredom threatens to envelop the production...If there is a complaint to be had, it’s that the piece isn’t brutal enough...The act of war is a vulgar, unnatural act. To watch it represented in the pleasant surroundings of the Delacorte Theater, vaguely sanitized, it almost seems a disservice. It’s a rare occasion when you wished for more depravity in our theater, but this is the world that we live in." Full Review

New York Theatre Review

for a previous production "Before you think that this show is nothing more than a dry lecture, I have to stress just how much fun a show 'The Imbible' is. Anthony Caporale is an excellent host, exactly the kind of raconteur that you want across from you at the bar. His stories are meandering without being vague, funny without being pithy, and full of enough references that you feel hip..I highly recommend that you take a trip down for what promises to be a most informative and entertaining evening." Full Review

New York Theatre Review

"The long-range repercussions of trauma, oppression, and the structural buttresses of racist America are explored through the letters between a pair of lovers...Directed with lyrical restraint by Evan Yionoulis, 'He Brought Her Heart Back In A Box' is memory that is the primary action of this play, as the two characters only share two short scenes together, and even these brief bookends are focused on the gulf of history that separates these tragic young lovers." Full Review

New York Theatre Review

"A brilliant and timely production...A miracle of theater, and one that probably should be seen by anyone who worries about where all of us are going...This production is, simply put, is a revelation. As directed by Arbus, it combines just about every theatrical element that exists under the sun...The giant cast crowd the stage and the audience, and almost every single one of them, from lead performers to members of the chorus, have moments to shine...I can’t praise this show enough." Full Review

The Dudleys!
Soho/Tribeca
New York Theatre Review

"There was a disconnect between the gestalt of the show, and the story it was telling, a disconnect that, as impressed as I was by the direction, design, and performances, left me wanting a little bit more...The design of this play, it must be stressed, is quite amazing...It was just a play, albeit one with great projections. And as a play, the script doesn’t live up to the creators' attempt to put an immersive world on stage. " Full Review

New York Theatre Review

“Stretches of the play call to mind the second acts of low-budget zombie films...Juxtaposed with these scenes of realistic teenage life are the cheer routines...These routines cast the girls as a Greek Chorus in their own lives, which only makes sense, as modern-day society constantly tells women–and especially young women–that their experiences are not theirs alone, and that their pain needs to be acknowledged by men in order to be considered real.” Full Review

Sugar Ray
Harlem
New York Theatre Review

"As directed by the Federal Theater’s Woodie King Jr., Wilson’s one-man monologue of Robinson’s life shows a different kind of superstar...Wilson portrays Robinson as a man proud of his extraordinary achievements, yet all too aware of his place in society. This illustrated the frustrating thing about Robinson’s life, and the play that depicted it...'Sugar Ray' is a collaboration between some greats of African-American culture." Full Review