Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman is a critic with New Yorker. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (10)
New Yorker

"Reports that the creators...were 'reshaping' the story for the #MeToo era have been greatly exaggerated...But Lawton and the film’s director, the late Garry Marshall, who co-wrote the book, have clearly taken a 'don’t mess with success' approach...Samantha Barks is agreeable as Vivian, and Andy Karl is an appealingly handsome Edward. The bright spots, though, come from the supporting cast...But it’s clear that the all-male creative team hasn’t interrogated the story." Full Review

New Yorker

"The cast is all-around good, but special credit goes to Butler...Also convincing are the 'art freaks,' Janis and Damian who in Fey's rewrite function as narrators...Fey's screenplay is so taut and quotable that the addition of songs seems almost gratuitous, and Richmond's music has the interchangeable pop-anthem sound that's become standard on Broadway. But who needs Tina Fey to reinvent musical comedy? She does just fine with the help of Casey Nicholaw." Full Review

The Parisian Woman
Midtown W
New Yorker

"Why does the play have such trouble finding its angle on the enraging political scene? Despite being self-knowingly au courant, 'The Parisian Woman' feels as creaky as an old boulevard entertainment...While the play informs us of Chloe’s allure, it’s not much in evidence...If people are drawn to Chloe, it’s not because Thurman has injected her with charisma...Thurman is a blank, swanning and sighing as if impersonating the leading lady of an old drawing-room comedy." Full Review

New Yorker

"The new production feels like the result of late-night script meetings and second-guessing. The artistic choices don’t seem wrong so much as exasperated...The effort to rejigger the story into something new has also opened a few plot holes...Despite its problems, the show is still watchable, in part because Dahl spun his modern fairy tale so nimbly. And it has some real bright spots. There are catchy songs interspersed with the wonderful Bricusse-Newley songs from the 1971 film." Full Review

New Yorker

for a previous production "An intricately planned fiasco...It takes incredible skill to pull off such bungling, and Mark Bell’s production nails every spit take and sight gag...Where Frayn went for three dimensions, Mischief Theatre settles for two—but that’s enough to sustain both acts, just barely. The show is pure comedic eye candy, and technically flawless. It’s closer to synchronized swimming or fight choreography than to its more contemplative theatrical cousins, revealing almost nothing about the human condition." Full Review

New Yorker

“A bouncy, bizarro, occasionally didactic musical...The amalgam is so brazen as to be immediately disarming: it would take a truly bad sport not to get on board with ersatz Elizabethan verse side by side with eighties earworms, delivered with equal gusto by a game cast...Mayer’s production revels in postmodern whimsy...The familiar tunes give the tale a welcome infusion of nostalgia...but the catalogue is puddle-deep." Full Review

New Yorker

"In heavy times, we can all use a little nonsense. (The good kind)...Here’s where the real twist comes: the show is very good. This is largely thanks to Tina Landau, its conceiver and director, who fills the stage with visual wit, from giant Rube Goldberg machines that spit out bouncy boulders to Zinn’s relentlessly clever costumes and sets...An all-star roster of artists supplied original songs but the standout is 'I’m Not a Loser,' by They Might Be Giants." Full Review

New Yorker

"Such minimalist material requires tremendous trust and patience, and Cromer has both, letting the story’s emotional music find its way to the surface...Plot-wise, 'The Band’s Visit' is a show about nothing, but it fills the stage with feeling—the muted kind that dwells in missed connections...'The Band’s Visit' doesn’t quite shake its cinematic roots but it succeeds on the strength of its cast and creators, who know exactly what, and when, to hold back." Full Review

Anastasia (NYC)
Midtown W
New Yorker

"In Tresnjak’s production, everything is incredibly overblown, from the screensaver-like cityscape projections to the score, by Flaherty and Ahrens, who never met a pop ballad that they couldn’t top off with a sweeping high note...Historical license doesn’t quite cover the liberties taken, and in this riches-to-rags-to-riches tale there’s a great deal of romantic nostalgia for imperial Russia...If you bring a small child, you might get some thorny questions about the October Revolution." Full Review

New Yorker

for a previous production "The score is rich and troubled and psychologically nuanced...Sondheim has always realized the devastating power of inertia, and 'Fun Home' does, too...Tesori and Kron have adopted Sondheim’s method without being derivative—their songs are character-driven gems." Full Review