Miriam Felton-Dansky

Miriam Felton-Dansky is a critic with Village Voice. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (80)
Preview hjj2
75
Village Voice

"Henry’s theatrical world is funny and strange and unpredictably horrible...There’s a Brechtian quality to the dialogue, which combines delightfully direct declaratives with imaginative expressions of emotion...At nearly two hours, 'Hunter John and Jane' feels longer than strictly necessary, and its songs don’t land as sharply as Henry’s dialogue...Even so, Henry’s writing is generous and surprising; if you haven’t seen her work, do so now." Full Review

Preview mab1 1
80
Village Voice

“An unsettling study in the language of intimacy...The gap between Marie and Bruce is heightened, or at least altered, by the fact that Hammel is trans, creating a world where a cis guy just keeps ignoring everything a trans woman says...Hammel and Landenberger devour their roles, and their design concepts add elegance and gloom...A grueling experience for artists and audiences alike.” Full Review

Preview efwvw1
55
Village Voice

"Scelsa...sets out to parody Albee’s work, taking the male playwright to task for his treatment of female characters...There’s rich material here...But Albee’s play is already so sardonically high-strung, crammed full of angry jabs and potent booze and weaponized parasols, that a dramatic response might be more compelling if it veered in the opposite direction — slowing down, taking 'Virginia Woolf' apart for closer examination...An amped-up, stomach-churning take on the original." Full Review

Preview s8
85
Village Voice

"A rigorous inquiry into the erotics of nonromantic relationships, acted like a Meisner exercise and staged like a contact sport...Markey and Davis deliver most of their dialogue inches from each other’s mouths, as if they’re about to kiss, or fight, or both...'Singlet' coheres because of Markey’s articulate, generous writing, which poignantly refracts the experiences of being American, and female, and queer, and in love." Full Review

Preview artwork cope final
75
Village Voice

"A sitcom-y space drama about family-making and personal risk...Clunky but sweet, Nguyen's piece is an invitation to value impossible odysseys, no matter where they might end...An odd mixture of thudding cliché and engaging ode to personal growth...The play's central comparison is between a fetus and a space probe...Won't launch you on a journey to wildly unknown terrain, but he'll lead you onto familiar ground with compassionate humor." Full Review

Preview rtt1
85
Village Voice

"There's insight - and enjoyment in director Ostermeier's 'Returning to Reims'...An elegant study in the subtleties of labor and power...Embodying theatrical adaptation at its best. It's true to its source, yet revelatory in its translation to the stage...Stunningly detailed performances make this exploration more riveting than you might think political theory could be...The director's ending hints at the generative possibilities that simply listening to others might offer." Full Review

Preview olr2
60
Village Voice

"Alfaro’s modern adaptation might leave you puzzled...The lengthy love scene emphasizes the performers’ nudity at the expense of their thoughts and emotions...The thought-provoking analogy between destiny and a system of oppression calls for more complexity...Produced in collaboration with Padrón’s excellent Sol Project, dedicated to creating space for Latinx playwrights...It’s a vital and necessary endeavor...Ditto Alfaro’s vision for contemporary L.A.” Full Review

Preview trotsw1
80
Village Voice

"A clever indictment of the blinding misogyny that underlies how our society insists on discussing rape, and the damage we all suffer as a result...Crowley surrounds Grace with broad personalities...And he punctuates the storytelling with delightfully campy interludes...Occasionally, Crowley’s insistent satire becomes wearing—he makes his points, many times over—but the excellent ensemble never wavers." Full Review

Preview samara
80
Village Voice

"Produced by Soho Rep in Sarah Benson's smart production, 'Samara' is a western in the key of Greek tragedy—a humane meditation on various ventures into parts unknown...Benson choreographs these harsh encounters with precision, and the cast imbues them with an emotional specificity that prevents the scenes from collapsing under their existential weight...Though hinting at these deeper connections, the production luckily stays in the realm of abstract imagination." Full Review

Preview rsz bull in a china shop
35
Village Voice

“Although Turner informs us that these women led surprising, exciting lives, we rarely glimpse these adventures. Instead, we're treated to lengthy monologues and repetitive dialogues parsing events that have already happened. A plot like this might still be theatrically compelling with a believable romance at its center, but onstage, it's tough to buy the idea that Graham and Qian share more than a halfhearted interest in each other's lives.” Full Review

Preview screenhunter 2587 jan. 09 20.02
65
Village Voice

"Intriguing, moving, and sometimes disappointing...Jacobs-Jenkins's experiment — transforming a fifteenth-century morality play into contemporary drama — is a bold one, and he updates 'Everyman's' theme in moving ways...At the same time, though allegory is always self-aware, repetitive self-conscious gestures suggest Jacobs-Jenkins felt some anxiety about our patience and imagination...It's hard not to wish Jacobs-Jenkins had trusted his material, and his audience, a little more." Full Review

Preview peergynt1
65
Village Voice

"’Peer Gynt’ demands a strong directorial approach and an incisive eye for adaptation, neither of which fully materializes in Ma-Yi Theater's ‘Peer Gynt and the Norwegian Hapa Band’…The result is often engaging and occasionally poignant but lacks a coherent take on Ibsen's notoriously incoherent tale...A stronger relationship between story and song could give the production the emotional center it somewhat lacks." Full Review

Preview p4
80
Village Voice

for a previous production "Kate Benson's sweet, thoughtful new play...The poetic, slightly surreal drama meditates on habit and indulgence and the social and economic structures shaping our private lives…Evans's intimate production serves the play's delicacy…The ensemble cast...delivers warm, sympathetic portraits of figures that, to a Brooklyn audience, are familiar: evoking our own daily lives, with our own unexamined habits and pleasures, awaiting us after the lights go down." Full Review

Preview the elements of oz
60
Village Voice

"This digital wizardry could have propelled a striking performance…The company spends its energy assembling information: historical context, allegorical interpretations, film-set trivia…What's hard to locate, among all the trivia and tech, is a theatrical destination — a reason for the research...These enticing tidbits never converge into a central event. The longer you sit, the more you might feel the urge to turn off your phone, head home, and cue up the Technicolor instead." Full Review

Preview last black man white
90
Village Voice

"A surreal, poetic meditation on the linked histories of slavery and colonialism…The play riffs on language and remixes racial stereotypes with boldness and grace, creating an experience that is both revelatory and irresistibly watchable…In beautiful choral interludes, the ensemble chants Parks's poetic refrains, which link colonialism to racism and underline the role of language in perpetuating it…These histories are bleak, but watching Parks's play is not." Full Review

Preview en garde arts silhouette no7 800x976
80
Village Voice

"A compassionate glimpse at the outer edge of teenage angst...A smart ensemble of young actors turns the real-life stories from Hamburger's research into an endearing constellation of high school kids in distress...Though it's poignant to hear from the parents, the interactions between the teens are what's most compelling here...There's a lot of beauty here. Between scenes, the teenagers perform unison choreography, which is, often, evocative and graceful." Full Review

Preview 24
90
Village Voice

"'Concert' doesn't begin to cover it. The piece is an endurance feat for Mac, his band, and the audience...It's a fashion spectacular, showcasing costume designer Machine Dazzle's wildly inventive creations. It's a series of pointed meditations on race, class, and gender in America...It's also an exercise in community building, among performers and spectators, together in a room for 24 hours. We sing along together, sprawl on the floor together, and eat together." Full Review

Preview nat turner
80
Village Voice

"The sparse, persuasive two-hander examines America's racial history, but feels disturbingly close to the present day...Brannon's Turner is tough to look away from: fervent, fearless, and unconcerned with eliciting pity...Occasionally, the dialogue becomes repetitive: Davis parses every piece of subtext and symbolism, often explaining things he doesn't need to. The scenario he's placed onstage speaks eloquently enough to our national past, and to our present." Full Review

Preview showposter 285x375.jpg  284x50000 q85 subsampling 2
90
Village Voice

for a previous production "In Sarah DeLappe's smart, delightful play, a high school team is the vehicle for exploring much bigger things…DeLappe's dialogue is hilarious and idiosyncratic, moving swiftly from gross-out humor to pain. The choreography lends the scenes a beautiful rhythm, and the cast endows their characters with both lightness and depth…'The Wolves' is thrilling: for its confidence and generosity—and for its feminism. DeLappe offers us ninety minutes in a smart, sympathetic, female world." Full Review

Preview caught1
85
Village Voice

"Chen's dark meta-comedy, 'Caught,' is a smart, self-assured meditation on the politics of truth, in art and in life…Under Evans's direction, 'Caught''s cascading series of revelations unfolds crisply, set against shifting white backdrops that give the impression we're in an art gallery, and a theater, at once…There's a frame around every fact, Chen suggests. Theater, an art form in which no one's who they say they are, helps us see it." Full Review

Preview men on boats white
90
Village Voice

"It's a smart, funny, poignant meditation on gender and historical memory, speaking as convincingly to our own time as any drama set in the present day…The distance between those macho white explorers and the racially diverse group of women playing them turns the performance into a study in learned male behaviors. It's hilarious, but also pointed, as Backhaus shows us the link between the pressures of white masculinity and the drive for territorial conquest." Full Review

Preview 82258 2
75
Village Voice

"'Privacy' manages to be both hugely entertaining and somewhat glib. It's impossible to tune out from the event Graham and Rourke have orchestrated: Each fresh revelation of our private data works like a magic trick, eliciting shocked laughter and delighted gasps. But these digital sleights of hand can also obscure deeper discussion. The dichotomy suggested by The Writer's tale, which pits live intimacy against digital exposure, feels oversimplified." Full Review

Preview thehealing
60
Village Voice

"Hunter's play contemplates the relationships between our physical and spiritual selves, and the damage that extremist thinking can perpetuate. Unfortunately the heavy emotions remain, steady and unchanging, offering little chance for real revelation to characters or audience alike…There's plenty of fodder for contemplation here, but Hunter seems tentative about shaping it into drama." Full Review

Preview indian summer white
70
Village Voice

"Enjoyable but slight…Moss seems to want his Rhode Island locals to serve as paragons of authenticity...In doing so, he risks condescending to them, suggesting that it might be news to us that meatheads have feelings or that intelligence and privilege are not necessarily aligned...Despite all this, 'Indian Summer' is enjoyable to watch. Moss's characters are endearingly familiar, his banter is crisply composed, and it's hard not to root for Daniel and Izzy's friendship." Full Review

Preview hadestown verticall 800p x 1200p rgb
85
Village Voice

"The Orpheus myth is about so much more than young love denied. And, luckily, singer-songwriter Anaïs Mitchell and director Rachel Chavkin celebrate such depths in the delightful new folk opera 'Hadestown'...The piece infuses the familiar Greek legend with sharp-edged commentary on capitalism, exuberant songs, and a complex meditation on love....Mitchell's best songs are raucous group numbers, expanding the characters' dilemmas into playful meditations on love and hardship." Full Review

Preview house showscore image
85
Village Voice

"'House' impresses on a number of levels: as a funny, sorrowful parable of nineteenth-century Creole New Orleans; an interrogation of complex racial histories; a tour de force of creative and verbose insults, delivered at breakneck speed. Lileana Blain-Cruz, with characteristic elegance and precision, directs an excellent cast...Gardley’s approach to historical background makes the white male power system concrete, and the onstage struggles urgently particular." Full Review

Preview show page 1
85
Village Voice

"Most of the people onstage are black, and most of the people in Soho Rep’s downtown audience are white. This problem, and the racist society for which 'Fairview’s' stage world acts as a microcosm, is the subject of Sibblies Drury’s hugely intelligent play...Insightful, mournful, and harboring maybe a glimmer of hope, 'Fairview' begins as a family comedy...Soon, the Frasiers’ living room is the site of a meticulously crafted, metatheatrical experiment in racial discourse." Full Review

Preview tjta1
75
Village Voice

"A spare, meticulous, and sometimes frustratingly oblique study of human interaction in disaster’s wake...With painstaking precision, Okada shuffles and rearranges his three protagonists to scramble our emotional and narrative coordinates...Deliberately uncomfortable pacing is part of Okada’s exacting design, meant to jolt spectators out of our assumptions about the passage of time..Effective, as far as it goes but it also feels less generously constructed than some of Okada’s previous works." Full Review

Preview aloha
75
Village Voice

"Bent's self-study, if unfinished in places, is the kind of candid introspection many of us should be undertaking — though probably funnier and sweeter than most of ours would be...There is no shortcut to confronting our white privilege, Bent observes; no course of action besides acknowledging mistakes, apologizing, and listening. She’s not the first to say so, but she’s funny and convincing, and her cringe-worthy confessions might inspire some self-examination of your own." Full Review

Preview blt p170 today tix 480x720
70
Village Voice

for a previous production "In difficult times, Jomama Jones is an artist whose company you want...Jones’s call to action is a kindly one; songs ask us to do better, to imagine ourselves as seeds ready to grow...'Black Light' lives somewhere between a cabaret act and a more expansive theatrical work, and you might ultimately wish Jones would venture farther toward the latter, keeping the lightness of touch while allowing herself more access to the ominous depths." Full Review

Preview rc3
70
Village Voice

"The stories contained on these stacks of cards are the reason to be here...The narratives land because they are so devastatingly ordinary...The invitation to share memories is the most successful of Mayet’s forays into audience participation, others of which come across as less carefully considered...Structure could be tightened, and its audience communications clarified, without sacrificing its deliberate informality. This would only highlight Mayet’s stories." Full Review

Preview aw1
70
Village Voice

“That long, late-breaking episode of darkness is one of the most affecting parts of ‘Animal Wisdom’, a sweet, quirky musical meditation on death...The music is sweet and strong, combining the jangles of folk, blues, and gospel...Though she advertises 'Animal Wisdom' as a requiem-slash-séance, a quest to summon long-lost relations, Christian is just as clearly after buried parts of herself...'Animal Wisdom' occasionally founders on obviousness and ghost-story cliché." Full Review

Preview img 0085
45
Village Voice

"Dohrn's indictment of secular prejudice is the most interesting element of what proves to be, otherwise, a carefully staged but overly familiar tale...There's no question that the public needs nuanced engagement with the Muslim-American world. But 'The Profane,' despite crisp staging and a strong ensemble cast, doesn't offer complex insights. Its plot is too cookie-cutter, its revelations too predictable: families and worldviews conveniently opposed." Full Review

Preview villa
85
Village Voice

“A smart, ironic drama…This combination — gruesome humor paired with deep insight — is what Calderón does best. The women's hypothetical visions raise unanswerable questions about whether trauma can ever be responsibly remembered, or really forgotten. They forge reality and fantasy into theatrical richness — a deeper kind than the play's ultimate moment of truth, when we learn why these particular women were chosen for such a momentous task.” Full Review

Preview img 0871
80
Village Voice

“James Anthony Tyler's smart new play, expertly directed by Charlotte Brathwaite…‘Dolphins and Sharks’ owes much of its power to Brathwaite's stellar production. The ensemble cast is excellent, imbuing their characters with sympathetic detail…The production's strength lends the play a sophistication it might otherwise sometimes lack. Tyler's writing is packed with thoughtfully observed psychology, but becomes structurally repetitive in the second act, as screaming matches pile up.” Full Review

Preview the town hall affair
80
Village Voice

"A smart, understated performance piece...The thought-provoking result draws on the company's virtuosic ability to bring historical scenes to contemporary life...This fidelity to the original event—buoyed by the company's expert performances—captures the debate's strange theatricality and allows it to throw the sexual politics of our own moment into stark relief...A nauseating reminder of how little has changed for women." Full Review

Preview rsz 1rsz orange julius face
70
Village Voice

"Kreimendahl's drama is a sympathetic, eloquent (and, at times, repetitive) effort…There's a lot to like about ‘Orange Julius:’ its articulate, forthright personal narrative; its attention to veterans' experience…Still, Kreimendahl's play would benefit from a ruthless edit: As Nut's story continues, scenes and themes begin to echo, then repeat—making the viewer long, by the end, for some shift in the drama's structure—and fewer flashback scenes would make each journey to Vietnam more striking." Full Review

Preview download  3
70
Village Voice

"A sincere exploration of the pressing issue of domestic violence...although, theatrically, it tends to oversimplify and oversweeten its tale...Miller's cast brings high energy...to the production, and Hyland writes with compassion. But the play feels unfinished, making little use of the theatrical elements at its disposal...Hyland seems torn between artistic complexity and the desire to educate…Still, it's hard to fault a young company for tackling a difficult subject with spirit." Full Review

Preview street children white
55
Village Voice

"Scala-Zankel flounders when it comes to crafting drama—overwrought dialogue, meandering scenes—though the piece is a welcome reminder of histories this island still holds…The dance breaks, it turns out, are the best part of the show…Scala-Zankel's dramaturgy could use some of that same rigor. The plot needs a ruthless edit, while the dialogue veers toward the melodramatic, with characters shouting their subtext and leaving little to our imagination." Full Review

Preview party23
80
Village Voice

"A passionate ode to the radical histories of the Black Panthers and the Young Lords, exploring the necessity and danger of revolutionary dissent. Its timing couldn't be more apt…Between scenes, montage-style song and dance sequences explore the history of the parties, black and Puerto Rican identity, and the new generation's anxieties…These sequences are raucously enjoyable, but it's the quieter moments that sink in." Full Review

Preview the loon
65
Village Voice

"An intriguing, unfinished-feeling new piece...The choreography is as appealingly resistant to interpretation as the lecture-performance is overly insistent on its messaging. Dance and theater aren't quite so much in dialogue as happening near each other, demonstrating alternate ways of being in time and space...Past Witness Relocation pieces have made a compelling case for the synthesis of dance and theater onstage. 'The Loon' doesn't quite get there." Full Review

Preview encounter1
90
Village Voice

"Even in public, it feels like we're in a time and space all our own...With sound designers Gareth Fry and Pete Malkin, McBurney transforms our own relationship to reality, space, and perception through the constantly shifting sounds in our headphones...McBurney's performance is captivating: He's exactly the kind of storyteller you'd happily listen to even in the absence of these technological interventions." Full Review

Preview a taste of honey slide 02  copy
75
Village Voice

"The fascinations of watching Jo make a case for why this play—which is both a revealing document of its era and at times maddeningly repetitive—deserves attention today…In Brockman's hands, Delaney's heroine is stubborn, unsentimental, and fascinatingly difficult to read…The secondary characters, though, don't offer the same intriguing complexities…Still, 'Honey' justifies its revival, offering a perspective we don't often see onstage: a working-class-female struggle to survive." Full Review

Preview 1469466281
60
Village Voice

"Haney struggles to bring the Trojans' story to life. Performers deliver choral text in tones that suggest self-consciousness about classical poetry, rather than moment-by-moment emotion. There are wistfully harmonious songs, and swoopy ensemble choreography...but both elements are overly recognizable, and the staging feels too familiar to shock us into connecting with the Trojans' plight...Occasionally, the young performers from the Bats find ways to ignite feeling." Full Review

Preview eng show score
35
Village Voice

"We get it: Love is a battlefield. But such well-trodden territory demands a fresh approach, and Teitler flounders trying to mold this quirky satire into a theatrical event…There's a whiff of 'Heathers' in 'Engagements'' female rivalries, and the suggestion of political critique in its contempt for the boring, wealthy khaki-wearers of this world. But neither of these elements fully takes shape, leaving the guest at Teitler's party wishing she could abscond with a few jalapeño poppers and leave." Full Review

Preview captcure
40
Village Voice

"Attempts to be many things: a riff on Dante's 'Divine Comedy,' an 'escape room' puzzle for spectators to solve, and a feat of technical design. These elements, alas, don't quite come together...As a theatrical experience, 'Paradiso' lacks any discernible logic. The story shards available in each room add up to little...'Paradiso' tries to straddle these disparate worlds, mainstream entertainment and theatrical spectacle—creating, so far, an escape room you'll very much want to leave." Full Review

Preview osloshowpage.jpeg  284x50000 q85 subsampling 2
75
Village Voice

for a previous production "'Oslo' is, at heart, a friendship saga, detailing the slow, unpredictable ways in which sworn enemies can warm to each other...In each of Rogers's three acts, the tension slowly mounts...Theatrically, 'Oslo' falls somewhat flat. Anxious to clarify the diplomatic intricacies, Rogers supplements his dialogue with repetitive direct-address narration...Still, 'Oslo' contains a form of thoughtful hope." Full Review

Preview 1463802647 13267755 10154162959114935 4731317085611790830 n
65
Village Voice

"Intriguing and, at times, frustratingly slight. 'I'm Bleeding' engages with complex subject matter, parsing the daily emotional toll that micro-aggressions exact and the director's evolving relationship with her audiences…On its own, unfortunately, the piece feels insubstantial, its scenes a bit jumpy, its observations on theater and love surprisingly general…But it contains the seeds of a larger and stronger observation built up over years of probing theater's unconventional edges." Full Review

Preview showposterwar.jpeg  284x50000 q85 subsampling 2
85
War
Village Voice

"Branden Jacobs-Jenkins's fascinating, meditative play is a family drama with existential scope, the story of a single clan that widens, in both subtle and ambitiously strange ways, to contemplate inheritance and belonging — not just to parents but to ancestors, racial identities, and the species as a whole...'War' — elegant and thoughtful — is at times more driven by concept than action. But these are concepts that bear extended contemplation." Full Review

Preview long.day.cast
65
Village Voice

"Such rich convergence of dramatic past and future is missing from the accomplished yet slightly vacant production...The Roundabout's virtuosic cast more than meets these demands...Rising to the challenge of the mammoth text is an accomplishment worth celebrating. But it's hard not to long for a little bit more from this production...The performance doesn't feel theatrically durational — just long." Full Review