Miriam Gillinson

Miriam Gillinson is a critic with The Guardian (UK). This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (35)
The Guardian (UK)

"Comedy. Definitely a comedy. Academics have long agonised about how to categorise 'The Tempest' but director Sean Holmes’s gleefully eccentric production is unequivocally comic." Full Review

Oklahoma! (London)
Southwark
The Guardian (UK)

It’s the supporting roles that make the strongest impression. Marisha Wallace electrifies as the frisky Ado Annie. It doesn’t all work ... But this is still a brave and invigorating show that effortlessly unearths the ugliness that has always glimmered beneath Oklahoma!’s beautiful morning. Full Review

After The End
Stratford
The Guardian (UK)

In fact, it’s all a bit depressing – a crude depiction of violence that doesn’t say anything new while making me feel those all too familiar jolts of disgust and fear. Full Review

Red Pitch
Shepherds Bush
The Guardian (UK)

Actors Kedar Williams-Stirling, Emeka Sesay and Francis Lovehall. Writer Tyrell Williams. All names to remember, who have created this fierce, affectionate, effortlessly funny play. Full Review

Broken Wings
Charing Cross
The Guardian (UK)

Naaman’s score, co-composed with Dana Al Fardan, is best when it’s unabashedly romantic and there’s a particularly handsome swell to the young love song, Here in This Garden. But there’s not a huge amount of variety to the music and surprisingly little of the unique sounds or rhythms of the Middle East. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Tweenies writer Will Brenton packs this festive frenzy with all the kids’ favourite flourishes, but there isn’t much for the adults beyond Rowe’s delightful Dame Trot. Full Review

Rice
Richmond
The Guardian (UK)

Matthew Xia directs with sensitivity and Bethany Gupwell’s lighting design is particularly evocative, working hard to ground this slightly skittering but thoughtful play. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

This is still a play about two profoundly lost men but the women in their lives – despite rarely appearing on stage – are more prominent, and it is their pain that begins to seep into the endless lonely silences. Full Review

The Nobodies
Islington
The Guardian (UK)

The story is strong but the real joy of Chalk Line Theatre’s production is in the storytelling – bold, engaging and conducted with energy and commitment. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

The script is lit up with an easy sense of humour that stops things getting too heavy or schmaltzy. Grace Mouat is particularly good as the am dram-loving English teacher who marks papers by day, and sings and sparkles (thanks to a helluva costume change) by night. Full Review

Raya
Hampstead
The Guardian (UK)

The characters spend a lot of time talking at cross-purposes or holding on to secrets the audience couldn’t hope to suspect or sense...It’s a shame because there’s an interesting character lurking in here – but there needs to be a lot more digging. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production With a cast that never misses a note, the West End’s longest-running musical proves a haunting and thrilling inspiration. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Inua Ellams’ beautifully observed work is a pulsing and poetic delight; a sweeping snapshot of life as an African man as a dizzying host of customers take a seat, relax and let us into their lives. Full Review

Radio
Dalston
The Guardian (UK)

Josh Roche directs with graceful restraint...This is a peculiarly subtle show and sometimes it feels a little too still and thoughtful...But there are moments that’ll transport you...' Full Review

Time Out London

for a previous production “A deeply thoughtful show, which ripples with fascinating ideas and images. It’s all a bit ‘full on’ and might’ve been terribly dull, but Byrne’s adaptation purrs with purpose. There are two strands, which play off each other in increasingly interesting ways...Byrne and Stanley direct with care and panache and the set and screen projections riff brilliantly on the play’s central concerns...A show that inspires us...and continue to ask difficult questions.” Full Review

Disco Pigs
Chelsea
Time Out London

for a previous production "A surprisingly compassionate twentieth anniversary revival, but it’s a little bit too clean and controlled...Neither Campbell nor Lynch feel wired or dangerous enough and the violent explosions, which burst through this play, lack a little heat...John Haidar carves out some nice moments with the canny use of lights, movement, and music...It’s the fleeting moments of hope that really sting." Full Review

Sketches on Theatre Blog

for a previous production "There are some – very rare – shows that have a confidence and magic about them from the moment they begin. ‘The Velveteen Rabbit’, a beautiful adaptation of Margery Williams’ popular children’s book, is one of those shows. The audience is spell-bound from the off and, as the narrators begin to tell their tale, the spectators giggle and sigh as one. We are swept away by this gentle but powerful story and the young crowd holds its breath, hooked until the very last moment." Full Review

Time Out London

“This is a sparkling, singing and shimmying conveyor belt of more than 30 of Jackson's greatest hits..What really hits home in this jubilant jukebox show is the range of repertoire available...The show, held together by the loosest of narratives, begins with a selection of Jackson 5 numbers. These earlier songs are among the best of the nigh...Some of these later songs are terrifyingly idiosyncratic and the lead vocalists struggle with the quirkier numbers...But it is the dancing that dazzles.” Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Noma Dumezweni is a compelling lead ... But there is something a little too controlled about Hnath’s play, as if the characters are being held up for careful study but never quite let off their leash. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

This is a joyfully silly take on Persuasion – with just enough sense (and sensibility) to hold the whole thing together...The ensemble cast perform with comic panache, but there are grains of truth beneath all the grandstanding. Full Review

Uncanny Valley
Clapham
The Guardian (UK)

Written by Stefan Kaegi of the German theatre group Rimini Protokoll, in collaboration with Melle, it’s a dense and earnest monologue penned from the perspective of this thoughtful writer. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

All the iconic elements from the 1977 film are in place in Bill Kenwright’s big-hearted production, as well as a few extras: more songs, more dancing and a Bee Gees band performing live on stage. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

But this is still a thoughtful and classy show, which shows a woman who remained resolutely herself (but always kept something back) as the men in her life looked for themselves – and lost themselves – in her dazzling glow. Full Review

The Bolds
London Bridge
The Guardian (UK)

There’s plenty of fun physical comedy, endless jokes (Mr Bold writes them for a living) and – thanks to the hyenas – lots of laughter...It’s all very jolly but the energy eventually lags. Running at two hours, Clary’s script is far too long and a bit shapeless. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

In many ways (most of them good), Small Things Theatre company’s latest production is a good old-fashioned romantic comedy. It involves a classic mismatched couple, destined to either hate each other or fall madly in love. Full Review

Leopards
Kingston
The Guardian (UK)

Metcalf is particularly good at capturing the ... dynamic between a young woman with lots to lose and an older man with everything to gain ... But when the action moves into the bedroom, everything unsaid is suddenly spoken and mystery [is] replaced with incredulity. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

This modern version of Marivaux’s romantic 18th-century comedy has farce rather than nuanced feeling at its centre...There are a few winking allusions to emails and digital detoxes but this isn’t a radical rewrite. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

John Straiton’s new play was longlisted for the prestigious Bruntwood prize and it’s a great piece of writing: thoughtfully sculpted, and punctuated by startling lyrical sections and striking observations. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

It’s with the nutty animal puppets that the show brightens up and starts to feel livelier, more immediate and – crucially – a lot more fun. Puppet designer Judith Hope has worked with Les Enfants Terribles and there’s an anarchic and extravagant streak to her designs. Full Review

The Guardian (UK)

Children's musical is a sticky mess...Andy Stanton’s adaptation of his own children’s books is packed with eccentricity and verbal flourishes – all at the expense of the story.' Full Review

Dark Sublime
West End
The Guardian (UK)

Sirtis, as Marianne, is genuinely moving as a near-forgotten actor whose star is on the wane...Andrew Keates directs with a palpable sense of mischief and affection. Full Review

Going Through
Shepherds Bush
The Guardian (UK)

...this is a surprisingly calming and gently uplifting play...This is a story that delights in language: its power, its variety and the rich sense of belonging it might bestow.' Full Review

Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production “There is something about Jez Butterworth’s great hunking slab of meat of a new play – all juicy and succulent and dripping in blood – that compels one to make human contact...Bang-out brilliant show – directed with verve and control by Sam Mendes...At its heart, ‘The Ferryman’ is an impassioned search for a true and lasting definition of ‘family’. Butterworth tests and tweaks this definition at every turn.” Full Review

Handa's Surprise
Midtown W
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "There’s a comfortingly repetitious nature to the show that allows the children to relax and sink into the story...The combination of Peter O’Rourke’s cheeky puppet and Michael Keyamo’s spluttering sound effects is comic gold. Some of the kids are bent over with laughter, as this odd little creature scampers among them." Full Review

Sleep No More
Chelsea
The Guardian (UK)

for a previous production "Rarely have I seen a more money-grabbing show, which has wowed New York's critics, but left me feeling short-changed...How on earth can a company charge such high prices for a show you cannot hope to appreciate fully in one, two or even three sittings? The numbers just don't add up. Except in the box office. And at the bar. Oh, and in that gift shop." Full Review