Molly Grogan

Molly Grogan is a critic with Exeunt Magazine. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (45)
Preview show page 1
85
Exeunt Magazine

"We laugh at the well-timed jokes, dance numbers, and antics so agilely lifted from TV comedy and delivered by the faultless cast...Yet the idea also forms that the genre and the story are vehicles for some more important business. That proves true in the play’s second act where the playwright lands a sucker punch....Benson manages. with physical humor and a deep respect for the playwright’s use of asides and interior monologues to lasso all of these swirling ideas and conflicting energies." Full Review

Preview tjta1
75
Exeunt Magazine

"Sounds like a shudderingly abstract story idea, until you experience Toshiki Okada’s play as directed by Dan Rothenberg...Under Rothenberg’s laser-pointed direction and the equally precise performances of the very fine trio of actors, time is seen and felt as a continuum, in real time...PlayCo’s production is preceded by an enigmatic prologue...A fitting abstraction of this journey of time through the space of a room and the higher spheres yet of emotion, imagination and memory." Full Review

Preview saysomethingbunny1
85
Exeunt Magazine

"Kobayashi marshals an ethnographer’s appreciation for cultural and historical context, a genealogist’s relish for placing relations on a family tree, a private investigator’s instincts to follow any lead and connect all the dots, and a storyteller’s flair for filling in the empty spaces. But it also says something about her capacity for empathy. This isn’t just a project to her; it’s a family’s lives she is holding in her hands." Full Review

Preview oh
80
Exeunt Magazine

"Malouf taps exquisite emotional precision to tell a polyvocal story of the Syrian people’s suffering...Zuabi overworks his metaphor at times and, as the director, seals the deal with an unnecessary concluding flourish, but those gripes are trifles in the bigger scheme of this production, whose hands-down strength is Malouf’s iridescent performance. She translates the range of human emotions that Zuabi relates with the empathy and imagination of the best storytellers." Full Review

Preview costofliving1
80
Exeunt Magazine

"Majok’s quietly burning play teases out the meanings and contexts of privilege and does so by means of stories that give center stage to disabilities...Bonney’s direction, whether emphasizing John’s little gestures of impatience or Ani’s thick shell, always underscores that these four are not on equal footing...Taken at the level of appearances, the cost of living might not seem the same for everyone but 'Cost of Living' posits that what matters is only how the price gets paid." Full Review

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65
Exeunt Magazine

"I think it is more effective to see the end before the beginning, given the cycle’s themes of tracing the present back to the past. But I wonder if seeing the plays in chronological order would have cast Abasiama’s actions as revealed in 'Portmanteau' in a more nuanced light...In 'Sojourners', we see her story unfold in context and judge it through our own lenses...The video projections of water in 'Sojourners' really didn’t add meaning for me, but instead seemed very obvious." Full Review

Preview arlington
75
Exeunt Magazine

"It’s hard to describe without trying to impose an interpretation, or see hints of '1984,' but we do so at the risk of reductivism. Walsh provides scant narrative from which to draw concepts like character, plot, theme, setting or meaning...Walsh manages to tap into both our nagging daily anxieties and our most conspiratorial fears. 'Arlington' looks and feels like that dream where familiar settings suddenly become menacing, for no identifiable reason, and we start running like hell." Full Review

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90
887
Exeunt Magazine

“An intensely personal revisiting of his childhood in Quebec...If '887’ is essentially the story of a memory exercise, it is all the more authentic as the presentation of life as it is lived, without much time to connect the dots. What makes the show memorable is its artistry. ‘887’ is theater on a grand scale...It is storytelling as great performance, with Lepage moving seamlessly through childhood and adulthood...Proof again of Lepage’s unparalleled powers of observation and creative genius." Full Review

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80
Exeunt Magazine

"A blisteringly funny comedy...Tyler’s deck is stacked. Yet it’s hard to mind his heavy hand since he deals us one ace after the other...A whip-smart look at race and class – one that frequently smarts, too. The actors are a real treat to watch...Brathwaite’s direction exposes layers of the characters’ turmoil in the cast’s strong performances...Tyler might overplay his hand at times, but we all cash in on the chips of his stinging dialogue and mordant exploration of ambition, race and class." Full Review

Preview made in china white
80
Exeunt Magazine

“’Made in China’ is a puppet story and a delightfully savage satire of the way Americans willfully ignore the complexities of China while benefiting from its repressive policies and mass production chain…There are plenty of clichés about China here; the pleasure is in watching them get sent up like Chinese firecrackers…The other pleasure here is watching the ensemble at work: eight puppeteers plus the Norwegian Minensemblet performing live.” Full Review

Preview rsz plenty
40
Exeunt Magazine

"'Plenty’s' intrigue and characters are indissociable from their context...Weisz is left to fill in the emotional void but her Susan Traherne borders on the hysterical, gasping between lines barked in strident tones and barreling across the stage in fits of pique. Worse, she never makes us feel what her dilemma, or her fight, really is...Suez is 'Plenty’s' Waterloo...But as forgotten as it is for American audiences, it makes a neatly appropriate allusion for this forgettable production." Full Review

Preview battlefield 305x489
90
Exeunt Magazine

"Brooks’ signature empty space of an exquisitely lit, unadorned stage is the setting for diamond-sharp performances that are cadenced like a sutra chant...The precision and harmony of the five performers are exemplary and perfectly matched to the gravity and timelessness of the 'Mahabharata’s' themes...'Battlefield' may tell of a horrific conflict and chastise the vanity of mankind, but we emerge feeling as though we have glimpsed dharma." Full Review

Preview undergroundrailroad
90
Exeunt Magazine

"They are really sifting through the speech we use, black and white, to talk about ourselves and each other. And they are using all the languages we humans have at our disposal: physical, intellectual, rational, emotional...The writing is consistently, searingly funny, especially when it reveals exactly what the characters most want to hide...A+ for ideas, effort and for making us laugh, cathartically, all the better to reflect and learn." Full Review

Preview the corn exchange
95
Exeunt Magazine

"It’s been rightly hailed as a tour de force performance since the show’s premiere...The takeaway from this adaptation, of course, is all Duffin, whose portrayals reveal an admirably sensitive reading of the characters...Duffin’s performance taps that mystic quality of ancient ritual, where the living and the dead, the present and absent, the visible and the invisible walk and talk as one." Full Review

Preview oearth textimage 404x270
85
Exeunt Magazine

"The production is a cathartic revisiting and revitalizing of Wilder’s text…But it is above all a production that is very much of and for our times, with a sly sampling of media tropes, an irreverent impatience with canons and conventions and a shot-across-the-bow discussion of LGBT rights, by a cast and crew for whom these are not abstract issues…Though 'O, Earth' treads a fine line between punchy entertainment and preachy didacticism, the Foundry’s argument cannot be denied." Full Review

Preview lazarus
40
Exeunt Magazine

"Essentially one big pop song written for the stage...This ought to be a liberating conceit, but the story demands constantly to be taken seriously…It also feels at times like the music has had all the wind knocked out of it...The direction and design provide some blessed relief...Incredibly, for a work marshaling so much talent and exciting so much anticipation, Lazarus lacks inspiration of all things, and that’s the hardest thing to forgive here." Full Review

Preview before your very eyes
80
Exeunt Magazine

"If our kids are growing up so fast, looking at these seven children from across New York’s social and cultural fabric, is to want them to hold on to what makes childhood so exciting: optimism, possibility and dreams...'Before Your Very Eyes' is an invitation to not only not stop them, but to see them get where they want to go, even if it means putting blinders on our own fears, and resurrecting a little crazy optimism again, a little fearless energy, when childhood is long gone." Full Review

Preview theatre juliette binoche une antigone a vif visuel article2
60
Exeunt Magazine

"Unfortunately, van Hove’s ultra clean – and can I say 'older?' – production avoided any conflict or contemporary issues and catered to a safe middle ground...The play’s theme of religion over politics is a big question still. I would have liked to see van Hove, of all directors out there, take the opportunity of Antigone to challenge us a little more. Instead, he plays it safe all around, with star casting and big visuals." Full Review

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100
Exeunt Magazine

"'My Perfect Mind' is a perfect diamond in the rough, an opportunity to see one of Britain’s greatest living actors in a mesmerizing, funny, whip-smart and thoroughly human performance, a meditation on life and acting – also Lear – directed by another great British actress, Kathryn Hunter." Full Review

Preview 10 12showpage
80
Exeunt Magazine

"There are plenty of laughs here... But Washburn also uses the occasion to sow some bigger ideas about the artistic and human value of the theater act, offering welcome content to what at first presents as an extended insider gag. Its immersive conceit, complex narrative structure and ambition to turn theater inside out (not to mention its deadpan humor) make '10 out of 12' another example of why downtown theater can sometimes feel so daring (and even when its not)." Full Review

Preview sf
85
Exeunt Magazine

"'The Sound and The Fury' will not be a straight reading – if that were possible – of Faulkner’s most difficult novel...Retaining only Benjy’s story from the novel’s sprawl, Elevator Repair Service delivers an expressionistic snapshot of the chaos of this once aristocratic family viewed, appropriately, by the most visible manifestation of its disorder." Full Review

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85
Exeunt Magazine

"A reminder of the complacency of all of us privileged enough to live in democracies but not angry enough to fight for one, it’s harder to swallow when the show draws an amalgam between the cruelty inflicted on a songbird and the murder of Tutsi children. As any marksman knows, precision is everything; with its sights more on target, 'Trash Cuisine’s' bullet would be all the more deadly." Full Review

Preview thiswastheend1
75
Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production "The actors in this tightly condensed version of the play are not taking it easy...Communicated by these frail bodies and potentially failing minds, the lethargy and immobility that paralyze everyone in 'Uncle Vanya' take on new meaning...Catlett weaves a poignant meditation on aging while magnifying pertinently Chekhov’s themes of lives spent fruitlessly and the painful mourning of these." Full Review

Preview saabh1
75
Exeunt Magazine

"Fae gives a powerful physical performance of survival and independence, delivering Wakefield as a fascinatingly woke frontierswoman who nevertheless feels in the core of her being every terror and injustice she endures...Fae evidently wants to elevate Wakefield’s story from a captivity narrative to a crusader’s tale, even her absorbing, nuanced performance cannot separate her adaptation of that story from the conventions and themes of a genre we might all do well to escape." Full Review

Preview s 1
80
Exeunt Magazine

“The most poetic hour of theater you are likely to see at the moment. That’s because ‘sheep #1’ is also a trip down the rabbit’s hole into Microscopic Live Cinema-Theater, a sub-genre of puppetry in which tiny figurines are filmed up-close as they are manipulated by a performer and the images are projected...‘sheep #1’ an allegory whose meaning remains as elusive as the sheep that can never be drawn, and the pleasure of lingering in its world is worth every question.” Full Review

Preview mfm2
60
Exeunt Magazine

"What they have done is stretch the text in some parts and, more often, compress it in others...The pacing can feel more capricious than meaningful, and sometimes flippant...The company’s signature, experimental approach to text here yields a deliberately radical result that sometimes is right for the text, and sometimes seems more in the service of the company’s concerns but it does deliver a 'Measure for Measure' for our satisfaction-driven, impatient, 21st century brains." Full Review

Preview ghostlight
55
Exeunt Magazine

“I think they’re trying to speak to the universality of theatre, but somehow get sidelined into the generic. Which is a shame because there are plenty of moments imbued with magic…About halfway through I realized it was just a series of pastiches and wasn’t going to offer more than that…I do feel like there was a through-line, or a central conceit, missing. I think perhaps they got a little stuck on the concept of ghosts.” Full Review

Preview a hunger artist
80
Exeunt Magazine

"Adapted by Luxenberg and performed by Levin, their 'Hunger Artist' brings both a mischievous sense of humor and an appropriate corporal versatility to this solo show about a most extreme case of extreme performance...Levin proves an irresistible master of ceremonies...His Hunger Artist is sinewy and athletic with an animal-like grace. We are captivated by his power...Luxenberg and Levin's ironic gaze seems to fall on the fleeting rewards of self-performance for a distracted public." Full Review

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65
Exeunt Magazine

"I loved the opening of 'Her Portmanteau'...I think it set up expectations for something less realistic and more imagistic than the plays in fact are...It all takes place on a single evening, which I think is perhaps to its detriment. It’s tackling more than thirty years of occluded, suppressed, and evaded relationships and memories, yet it reaches a hasty (and to me unsatisfying) resolution." Full Review

Preview kidnap road
60
Exeunt Magazine

"If Filloux means for us to understand the Woman of 'Kidnap Road' as a symbol and not Betancourt herself, Townsend’s set helps us to get there. But then, what does that symbol represent, for Filloux?...It’s never been easy to know what women can or should take away from Betancourt’s challenging story and highly driven person, but 'Kidnap Road,' while satisfying enough as a theater object in the existential two-hander genre, takes us into disorienting territory." Full Review

Preview villa
85
Exeunt Magazine

"The excellent trio of actresses put heart and soul into making us feel the enormity of their task...Still, where the play will connect with audiences in its US run is through its writing–Calderón’s flashes of absurdity, irony and wit–more than through its problem of historical memory and national reconciliation...A shrewd, engaged play in a passionate production...'Villa' is a subtle work of political theater by an exciting contemporary voice...The play is a knockout, and indeed memorable." Full Review

Preview e2
80
Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production “‘Enterprise’ delivers but with a twist: the humor builds not from the absurdities of corporate culture, but from language…Despite the characters’ embarrassingly bad word play, these employees seem intrinsically aware that speech is man’s most powerful tool… To paraphrase Shakespeare, in whose tradition Parks is working here, when life gives you a 'feast of language,' it would seem stingy not to spend it." Full Review

Preview lula del ray white
70
Exeunt Magazine

"There is much to fall in love with here, the sometimes gorgeous aesthetic...the atmospheric score...and the whole troupe’s creative vision and energy...Sarah Fornace and Julia Miller are admirable in making every gesture concrete...Still, the story of Lula’s crush on fictional crooners The Baden Brothers doesn’t take us on much of a journey...Though she blasts off finally for space, 'Lula del Ray’s' star-gazing left me earthbound, yet bedazzled all the same by Manual Cinema’s artful poetry." Full Review

Preview god projekt white
85
Exeunt Magazine

"Lone Wolf Tribe’s multimedia production, which returns to La MaMa’s annual Puppet Series after a run in 2013, deserves a second look. First of all, there are the startlingly grotesque puppets...Augustine turns in a commandingly versatile performance...If you’ve ever had a problem with the notion of a benevolent Father and wanted to raise a middle finger to the Heavens, 'The God Projekt' might be the answer to your prayers." Full Review

Preview 59e59 undertaking poster
45
Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production "Rather desperate after so many hours of interviews, in the absence of any findings, you finally engage in a bit of pantomime to simulate the voyage to the mythical underworld. Unfortunately for those of us in the audience, Cosson doesn’t uncover much more, or at least not about death...Glimpses of authenticity are too infrequent and are quickly smoothed over when the storyline resumes...I was too intent on finding something bigger than the sum of its parts. My loss." Full Review

Preview streetcar1
70
Exeunt Magazine

"Though these two may have a date with destiny, there is no spark between them. This proves to be the best thing Andrews could do with the play, by giving us a Blanche we can respect and a Stanley we cannot...It certainly finds new and welcome readings in Williams’ classic, which is what the best adaptations do...Andrews and Anderson keep a tight hand on the madness card, but they play, unflinchingly, the woman card, and it feels like Williams would agree." Full Review

Preview revolt show page
65
Exeunt Magazine

"While Daniel Abeles, Molly Bernard, Eboni Booth and Jennifer Ikeda are serviceable in their roles, their quartet feels too tidy to hit the high notes of Birch’s full-throttled scream of anger. As invigorating as Birch’s writing can be as she calls out behavior and language we are accustomed to taking for granted, 'Revolt‘s' extremes leave us at an impasse that we understand to be deliberate, but which is no less frustrating." Full Review

Preview marjorieprime
70
Exeunt Magazine

"But mostly the AI conceit feels like a device for examining the one, inherently human condition that no robot can know: death and grieving. The story-telling process of programming the primes offers the most interesting parts of the drama...This is where 'Marjorie Prime' has the most to say; the plot surprises afforded by the AI story come off as mere provocation." Full Review

Preview abyss
60
Exeunt Magazine

"The murder mystery offers rich enough sport once the elliptical text finds its footing, but in the context of the current world refugee crisis, I found that Milisavljevic’s oblique commentary on Germany’s contemporary ethnic patchwork provided more gripping distractions...The three-strong cast takes on these games’ many players with uneven inspiration...The Play Company’s 'Abyss' wades only waist deep into those churning waters, but it might have better played at another game, taken the dare... Full Review

Preview futurity showpage 439x620
75
Exeunt Magazine

"It does all work, and it does feel very good. Every song hits its mark, whether it’s a banjo-plucking piece of Americana or indie pop...Alvarez and Tunis make an adorable pair on stage, and their intermittent banter creates a welcome, grounding counterpoint to the story’s fantastical premise and lofty idealism...Yet as utterly charming as all of that is, the production never really dreams the future." Full Review

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65
Village Voice

"Once under way, the production is soon at sea in the close quarters of Jason Sherwood's maritimey-bric-a-brac set, hauling in clichés faster than a trawling net scoops fish. Luckily, every plot twist is an occasion for the band the Lobbyists to jam out to another original number. The music is by far the best part of this soggy melodrama." Full Review

Preview gloria
60
Exeunt Magazine

"'Gloria' is a cartoonishly flat close-up on a single focus of interest...'Gloria' is no more and no less than the sum of its parts: sharp dialogue, a mostly latent commentary on race, and those irredeemable characters. The combination makes for a comedy about all that is wrong with publishing but not much more." Full Review

Preview composition
90
Exeunt Magazine

"Much more engaging than its title would suggest. Greenspan is a mesmerizing performer...As Stein’s interpreter par excellence, he strikes a fine balance between her imperiousness and her quest for understanding...Greenspan’s interpretation of these foundational Stein texts offers much to contemplate for days to come." Full Review

Preview let us now
60
Exeunt Magazine

"A quirky, uneven production...When the lights go up in this age of the ubiquitous image, playwright Kempson’s hope is that our own eyes will be clear of illusions, à la Sontag: "This very passivity of the photographic record is photography’s ‘message,’ its aggression.” Did we need Sontag – and Kempson - to tell us that anymore?" Full Review

Preview img 0077
80
Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production "'The Object Lesson' is instantly recognizable as another inspiring product of the physical theater of the French pedagogue Jacques Lecoq, with whom Sobelle trained, and whose elementals reside in the keen observation of the actor’s environment...Sobelle dexterously assembles a charmingly quick-witted and inventive tale about a life appreciated through its debris." Full Review