Natasha Tripney

Natasha Tripney is a critic with Exeunt Magazine. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (63)
Little Wimmin
Battersea
The Stage (UK)

It’s mostly as deft as it is daft ... But it struggles to sustain itself over its two-hour running time and for all its playful energy, it feels like there’s a tauter, sharper show contained in here that never wholly emerges. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

By opening the play out to multiple casts, it comes to feel more of a metatheatrical exercise – its dramatic mechanics more apparent – and less an eviscerating exploration of the universe. Full Review

Under Milk Wood
Waterloo
The Stage (UK)

This production captures some of that magic; it contains instances of comedy and pathos but some of the world-building lacks clarity and, at times, it falls awkwardly between two stools, breaking its spell. Full Review

J'Ouvert
Westminster
The Stage (UK)

Joseph’s writing captures the heat and colour of carnival, but also provides a more layered look at its history and political significance. Full Review

Walden
Westminster
The Stage (UK)

The play knits together a number of interesting and pertinent threads: about humankind’s responsibility to the world, but also about individuality and genetics, and the American thirst for expansion. Full Review

Harm
Shepherds Bush
The Stage (UK)

The play is at its best when it is at its darkest – when digging into the narrator’s sense of self-loathing, or highlighting how single, childless women can still be made to feel like pariahs. But it resists getting its hands really grubby – from sinking elbow-deep into the muck. Full Review

On Blueberry Hill
Westminster
The Stage (UK)

It’s a finely crafted piece, with some lines sweet enough to drink, others capable of breaking you apart. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

While the production is not short of over-the-top pleasures, in this condensed version some of the subplots feels truncated and rushed...it seems to run out of steam.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Smith’s writing has a strong poetic style, a bold, bodily quality; it is full of ripples and echoes... Elizabeth Freestone’s production...is frustratingly restrained.' Full Review

The Welkin
Lambeth
The Stage (UK)

While the first half is beautifully calibrated, tight as a high wire, things slacken a bit in the second half...this audacious play’s strength lies in the richly textured picture it paints of these women and their lives...' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

A potent study of women, power and patriarchy...Hickson writes with her usual mix of wit, intelligence, empathy and a metallic clarity of thought, interlacing history with anachronism...' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Matthew Warchus’ production seems ... to want to have its Christmas cake and eat it. Many of the lines hit even harder now than they did in 2017, with Dickens’ ideas about society, and how it cares for its poor and vulnerable, ringing out like a bell. Full Review

Richard III
Bankside
The Stage (UK)

Some of the elements are jarring and not everything the production tries works. But its energy and verve are considerable, and the show makes a potent closer for the Globe’s history cycle.' Full Review

Touching The Void
Charing Cross
The Stage (UK)

What the production does particularly well, however, is make it possible to appreciate Simon’s horrific predicament in leaving his climbing partner behind while also allowing the audience to marvel at human resilience in the most testing of circumstances. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It’s all so effortful and strained, stuffed to the brim with slapstick, fart jokes and people getting smacked in the knackers...Hard as the cast works, and they work very hard, the whole thing feels laboured. Full Review

Bartholomew Fair
Bankside
The Stage (UK)

This feels like a production constructed by someone who knows the play intimately...although it’s always enjoyable and has an agreeable momentum, it can feel confusing at times...' Full Review

The Night of the Iguana
Covent Garden
The Stage (UK)

The resulting play, however, is a tale of salvation – a sensuous, humane, if over-baked piece about the hope that people can offer one another. Full Review

Dark Sublime
Westminster
The Stage (UK)

It’s also refreshing to see an emotionally complex relationship between two older women given such prominence, but this overstretched play is at its best when looking at fan culture in an un-cynical way. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

This is not to say it’s not a lot of fun... the production has a timely embracive message, is easy to follow and enjoy. There’s clarity of verse throughout... but what it lacks is clarity of purpose.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Sarah amankwah is majestic...She’s a natural orator, at ease with the verse... She’s vigorous and dignified, yet has a sense of stillness. She’s calculating, commanding and convincing as a leader of men.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

The cast is exemplary throughout, the performances rich and moving, the production revelatory and atmospheric...It’s impressive how contemporary it feels.' Full Review

Betrayal
Westminster
The Stage (UK)

The coolness of it all means that some of the play’s emotional potency is diluted, but it’s always gripping – and superbly performed, particularly by Hiddleston. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

“This new musical version feels like a labour of love...It understands the enduring appeal of the show while showing zero interest in evolving or updating the formula...It doesn’t really work as a musical, though...It all feels a bit cobbled together. The plot is also as flimsy as a paper cocktail umbrella...The charm of the cast goes a good way to salvaging things...The result is a show that shouldn’t work and often doesn’t, but is enjoyable all the same.” Full Review

The Exorcist
Camden Town
The Stage (UK)

While the production delivers a couple of serviceable jump-scares, it fails to capture what made the original so visceral and, well, compelling. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

A lopsided two-hander...Cranham and Duff are both fine actors. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

The tone sometimes feels heavy-handed and didactic but, at other times, Ince’s approach explodes the play in a necessary way. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Co-directors Rachel O’Riordan and Diane Page bring emotional texture and momentum to all three plays. O’Riordan, who directed the extraordinary Iphigenia in Splott, knows well how to make one voice fill a stage. The pieces together make for a richly layered and reflective triptych. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Wilkin is an electric performer of her own material. She’s a warm and engaging stage presence, a very physical performer, playing Myah with a mix of goofiness, humour, pathos and fidgety energy. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It’s a gruelling piece to perform, but Dwan, pregnant beneath her skirt of earth, is in her element, at once hypnotic and human. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It ramps up the comedy over the emotional notes at times, but its insistence on showing the audience a good time feels like precisely the right approach at the moment – exactly what people need. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Nicholas Hytner’s production... delivers everything you’d expect of it. It is cosy, polished, grown up and suitably cockle-warming, deeply traditional, the antithesis of brash. It is egg nog in theatre form.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Produced in 2020, created predominantly by men but marketed at women, this is nostalgia-by-numbers padded out with ballads, as cynical as it is icky. Full Review

A Number
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

Though Findlay successfully draws out the horror of the scenario, the domestic setting jars, perhaps not in the way intended. It weighs down a play that contains so much already, dampening its disquieting power.' Full Review

Uncle Vanya
Westminster
The Stage (UK)

Ian Rickson’s production is polished to a high shine. The emotional arcs, the richness of the performances, the lucidity of the adaptation, the sumptuous design... Full Review

Magic Goes Wrong
Westminster
The Stage (UK)

But, though it doesn’t hit the highs of some previous Mischief outings, it remains a solidly entertaining show, from a company evidently keen to test itself, and, for once, there are a few sweet instances where everything goes right. Full Review

Cyrano de Bergerac
Westminster
The Stage (UK)

James mcavoy radiates charisma...Yes there are times when Lloyd’s production feels like it’s striving too hard to generate a hip, post-Hamilton vibe, but it tempers this with a sense of humour. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Sally Cookson’s staging for Elliott and Harper Productions is a typically wonder-filled affair... Cookson’s staging is infused with adventurous spirit and studded with moments of magic.' Full Review

Henry VI
Bankside
The Stage (UK)

If it’s blunt at times, the production also brings a clarity to all the power-playing and betrayal, and, crucially, though long, it is never, ever boring, never ever dull.' Full Review

Translations
Lambeth
The Stage (UK)

It’s a traditional and earth-bound staging in many ways, but it’s also captivating, suffused with the wonder of words. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

...despite one utterly heart-rending moment...Evans’ production feels too comfy and clean... the production never comes close to replicating the rawness and daring – the shit and the spit – of the play itself.' Full Review

Fleabag
Covent Garden
The Stage (UK)

A triumphant return...the stage show is darker and bleaker than the television series it spawned. It’s less hopeful in many ways, but still very funny. Full Review

Peter Gynt
Lambeth
The Stage (UK)

While David Hare’s satirical update...contains some witty lines and a magnetic central performance from James McArdle, for the most part it’s tedious and heavy-handed stuff. And long. Very long.' Full Review

Citysong
Soho
The Stage (UK)

Poignant, lyrical and gorgeously written...The play never focuses on any one person for long and some of the characters are sketched in charcoal rather than pencil, but it’s the imagery that lingers...' Full Review

Orpheus Descending
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

Because this is Williams, the writing contains moments of poetic vibrancy...Harvey’s production makes it possible to glimpse the play’s strengths while also appreciating why it’s not staged all that often.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

...She’s [Michelle Terry] fantastic in the title role, vivid and intense... There are some lovely comic moments too, but it’s Terry’s cocky, complicated Hotspur who illuminates this accessible, enjoyable production.' Full Review

Rosmersholm
Charing Cross
The Stage (UK)

...Ian Rickson’s production feels frustratingly stiff and static. Atwell’s rich, humane performance transcends this, but it remains a rather thinky, talky production. It engages the brain without stirring the heart. Full Review

Only Fools and Horses
Westminster
The Stage (UK)

The result is a show that shouldn’t work and often doesn’t, but is enjoyable all the same. Full Review

Glengarry Glen Ross
Westminster
The Stage (UK)

While there’s something wearying about seeing yet another West End stage filled with men, their issues and their egos, this is a potent and dismayingly timely revival. Full Review

Young Frankenstein
Charing Cross
The Stage (UK)

Young Frankenstein would be a middling musical even were it not for the Nixon-era sexual politics...the way the show treats women cannot be overlooked. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "While Caplan is a thunder-lunged performer with a voice that is positively meteorological, his presence swamps the production and smothers the delicacy of the story being told. It’s a dominant and showy performance, though his vocal power is undoubted. Mary Fay Coady gives a characterful and precise performance...However, some of the songs, by Caplan and director Christian Barry, are tonally jarring." Full Review