Natasha Tripney

Natasha Tripney is a critic with Exeunt Magazine. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (15)
The Stage (UK)

“This new musical version feels like a labour of love...It understands the enduring appeal of the show while showing zero interest in evolving or updating the formula...It doesn’t really work as a musical, though...It all feels a bit cobbled together. The plot is also as flimsy as a paper cocktail umbrella...The charm of the cast goes a good way to salvaging things...The result is a show that shouldn’t work and often doesn’t, but is enjoyable all the same.” Full Review

The Stage (UK)

"Though 'The Ferryman' is compelling even in its quiet moments, the play doesn’t entirely justify its mammoth running time and the violent tying together of the various threads feels a little rapid – if genuinely shocking. The last few moments will knock the wind out of you. In his mixing of the mythic and the modern...there’s a sense too that Butterworth is repurposing some of his former tricks – but it doesn’t really matter: they’re brilliant tricks and that’s what all magicians do." Full Review

We Live by the Sea
Midtown E
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "An inventive and well-judged piece…It feels like everything has been very carefully considered. Alex Howarth’s production is so light and tight that you can forgive it the occasional sidestep into fairy-lit whimsy...There are no easy answers or magic cures. The standard of performance is high all-round, but Alex Brain’s performance as Katy is incredible, sustained, rich and funny, her timing exact. Informative without being worthy, this a really appealing piece. Lovely stuff." Full Review

Cyprus Avenue
East Village
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Ireland’s disturbing and absurdist play about the complexity of Ulster loyalist identity...At times Featherstone’s production resembles a brutal skit on the export of Irish culture, but at its best it’s altogether more long-limbed and questioning. There’s a jolting quality to the comedy. Rea handles the play’s shifts in tone and register superbly – he’s appalling but he’s also appallingly plausible, a melancholy and desperate man...This is caustic, audience-rattling writing, theatre that sha... Full Review

Rotterdam
Midtown E
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Brittain’s warm-hearted new play manages to speak eloquently about a complex issue while at the same time being properly laugh-out-loud funny. It’s an arresting combination...There’s also delicacy and truth to the writing–this is a very human play, one that never feels overtly issue-driven or forced. The central tangle of relationships in Donnacadh O’Briain’s production is shaded and emotionally engaging, and there are strong performances all round." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "It is an intelligent, info-rich show. Brinkman fires data and statistics at his audience in lyrical waves...As a performer he is fluid, self-aware, passionate and engaging. He is also very funny, and while some of the things he discusses are rightfully alarming, there is a lot of wit in his writing too – he leaves his audience with much to think about." Full Review

Radiant Vermin
Midtown E
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "It’s heavy-legged and obvious in places, but it is finely tuned in its way, a fable-like tale, glittering with menace and laced with the supernatural...There’s this absolutely extraordinary sequence where Whelan and Verey, recreate a garden party; they populate the entire stage with characters, and it’s the most precise, intense and breathtaking piece of performance, masterfully directed by David Mercatali, and it kicks the whole production up into the realms of the brilliant." Full Review

Cuckooed
Midtown E
Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production "He’s a gifted storyteller, and his affable blokey persona, underscored as it often is, with necessary anger works as well on the Traverse stage as it would in a comedy club. He knows just how to land a line, how to shade it, how to invest what he’s saying with emotional weight...This new piece feels more like his work of old, info-rich yet accessible in its activist agenda, but with the addition of something more personal and emotionally knotty at its heart." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "While Caplan is a thunder-lunged performer with a voice that is positively meteorological, his presence swamps the production and smothers the delicacy of the story being told. It’s a dominant and showy performance, though his vocal power is undoubted. Mary Fay Coady gives a characterful and precise performance...However, some of the songs, by Caplan and director Christian Barry, are tonally jarring." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "Of all the three it’s the least theatrically satisfying, a little bitty and fitful in comparison. But while it lacks of the propulsion of ‘Julius Caesar’ and ‘Henry IV,’ it features a commanding central performance from Harriet Walter…While it might be the least cohesive of the three, as the culmination of a project that explores how Shakespeare is played and by whom, that populates the stage with fascinating, complex women, it is still a production of power and a source of joy." Full Review

Counting Sheep
Financial
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "This mixture of the passive and the active ends up being the show’s most tricky element. As an experience it’s undeniably powerful and affecting, but it has its own narrative arc, too. It’s a potent and thought-provoking, if at times difficult, piece. The skill with which it’s been created is clear though; the way it fills the space, the way it uses music, and the way it imparts an understanding that this story is part of something larger and far from over." Full Review

Escaped Alone
Brooklyn
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production “The interludes are disquieting but also more than a little absurd, funnier than they have any right to be. They’re delivered by the incomparable Linda Bassett, excellent as ever, a magnetic presence…She’s accompanied by Deborah Findlay, Kika Markham and June Watson, all also superb…The play as a whole is hard to get a grip on, it wriggles, it eels around the stage. But it’s also hypnotic. And kind of comfy. And distinctly odd. And sharp. Like an M&S cardigan with nails embedded in it.” Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production “Phillips is a fluid, shifting storyteller, something of a conjuror. As a piece of performance it is technically brilliant, dizzyingly so. Each episode is beautifully rendered, an act of transportation; he is effortlessly multilingual...The staging is incredibly effective...Beneath the humour of these vignettes, the piece is laced with poignancy in the things it has to say about immigration and freedom of movement, the walls we erect, the barriers between people.” Full Review

Ross & Rachel
Midtown E
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "James Fritz’s startling new play…It uses pop culture as a way of exploring common fears and anxieties...For those who do know 'Friends' it’s cleverly laced with references in a way that enhances its preoccupation with the passing of time…Vevers gives a brilliantly measured performance, subtly defining both people, while beautifully handing the characters' gradual unraveling. Thomas Martin’s production is confident and assured." Full Review

Henry IV
Brooklyn
Exeunt Magazine

for a previous production "This is, let’s be clear, an inventive and exciting production, but I couldn’t help feel that it tries to explain itself too much, to find ways of accounting for the fact that all these women are together on stage, instead of just revelling in it – because it is a thing worth revelling in...Part of me just wishes they didn’t feel the need to justify and contextualise the casting in this way – because, regardless of setting, the cast are amazing." Full Review