Natasha Tripney

Natasha Tripney is a critic with Exeunt Magazine. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (87)
The Stage (UK)

"This remains a vividly imagined and emotionally textured adaptation, philosophical, questioning and heartfelt." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

"'Who Killed My Father' is at once Van Hove at his most understated and most socially engaged, and the piece is more powerful for it." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

"Holmes’ production does not ignore the play’s darker undercurrents and colonial overtones, but they are buried deeper in the mix than is sometimes the case. It is predominantly concerned with keeping the audience amused, and though it suffers from audibility and clarity issues to begin with." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

"It’s ultimately a play about what it means to have ideals and to try to implement them. Though the ending, in which we return to the present, is low-key and poignant, it is offset with a note of hope." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

"The delicious design is matched by a production of both narrative and emotional clarity. Godwin’s style can sometimes feel aggressively slick, but for all its surface gloss this is an accessible production that hits the right beats. It’s a glittery, apolitical production but it’s well cast, stylish, summery stuff." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

The overall breezy tone means that the sudden shifts into darkness feels more marked. But this darkness is quickly banished ... in a production intent on spreading good cheer and warm feeling, a little sunshine after a hard winter. Full Review

Scandaltown (London)
Hammersmith
The Stage (UK)

...the pacing of Rachel O’Riordan’s production regularly saps the snap out of the lines. Too often, where it needs to be tight, it’s baggy...more often than not, it feels muted, lacking the fire, anger – and clarity of purpose – that fuels the best satire. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

[Ruth Wilson] is an eminently watchable performer, shifting from feigned resilience to distress, conveying the intensity of feeling...But, good as she is, she feels constrained by this production. Full Review

Mohand & Peter (London)
Elephant and Castle
The Stage (UK)

Devised by the company and directed by Sophie Bertrand Besse, the piece uses physical comedy to tell the story in an accessible and amusing way. Full Review

The Collaboration
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

For a play about mould-breakers, it’s structurally and dramatically formulaic, but McCarten has a real knack for humanising icons – for digging beneath the image to reveal the flaws, the contradictions and emotional complexity. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Lloyd’s production delights in the music of voices – coupled with the Ringham brothers’ sound design and Vaneeka Dadhria’s beatboxing – it continually underscores the fact that this play is, as much as anything, an impassioned love letter to the power of words. Full Review

A Number (Old Vic)
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

Together, [Essiedu] and James immaculately capture the rhythm of Churchill’s writing, all the little hitches, lulls and sentences left hanging. [Turner] draws more humour out of the play than one might expect. Full Review

Little Wimmin
Clapham
The Stage (UK)

It’s mostly as deft as it is daft ... But it struggles to sustain itself over its two-hour running time and for all its playful energy, it feels like there’s a tauter, sharper show contained in here that never wholly emerges. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

This is an accomplished production in many ways, but, almost too focused on the task at hand, it lacks emotional heft, skips too quickly over key scenes and can’t ever fully escape the shadow of the axe. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

The tone sometimes feels heavy-handed and didactic but, at other times, Ince’s approach explodes the play in a necessary way. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Co-directors Rachel O’Riordan and Diane Page bring emotional texture and momentum to all three plays. O’Riordan, who directed the extraordinary Iphigenia in Splott, knows well how to make one voice fill a stage. The pieces together make for a richly layered and reflective triptych. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production Wilkin is an electric performer of her own material. She’s a warm and engaging stage presence, a very physical performer, playing Myah with a mix of goofiness, humour, pathos and fidgety energy. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It’s a gruelling piece to perform, but Dwan, pregnant beneath her skirt of earth, is in her element, at once hypnotic and human. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It ramps up the comedy over the emotional notes at times, but its insistence on showing the audience a good time feels like precisely the right approach at the moment – exactly what people need. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production Nicholas Hytner’s production... delivers everything you’d expect of it. It is cosy, polished, grown up and suitably cockle-warming, deeply traditional, the antithesis of brash. It is egg nog in theatre form.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production Produced in 2020, created predominantly by men but marketed at women, this is nostalgia-by-numbers padded out with ballads, as cynical as it is icky. Full Review

A Number
London Bridge
The Stage (UK)

Though Findlay successfully draws out the horror of the scenario, the domestic setting jars, perhaps not in the way intended. It weighs down a play that contains so much already, dampening its disquieting power.' Full Review

Uncle Vanya
West End
The Stage (UK)

Ian Rickson’s production is polished to a high shine. The emotional arcs, the richness of the performances, the lucidity of the adaptation, the sumptuous design... Full Review

Magic Goes Wrong
West End
The Stage (UK)

for a previous production But, though it doesn’t hit the highs of some previous Mischief outings, it remains a solidly entertaining show, from a company evidently keen to test itself, and, for once, there are a few sweet instances where everything goes right. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production James mcavoy radiates charisma...Yes there are times when Lloyd’s production feels like it’s striving too hard to generate a hip, post-Hamilton vibe, but it tempers this with a sense of humour. Full Review

Antigone (London)
Fitzrovia
The London Evening Standard

"There is something refreshing about seeing these issues - the human consequence of inhumane policies - tackled on stage in such a direct way as well as seeing Muslim prayer and ritual presented with reverence and care." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production "It’s a polished, gorgeous piece of storytelling theatre, undoubtedly, and yet, for me, it was missing something – I felt like I was watching a beautiful piece of engineering." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

"Bill Buckhurst’s production takes a while warming up in the first half... but the pacing and energy levels improve significantly in the second half. ... This joining of voices eclipses everything else and is genuinely uplifting – even glorious." Full Review

Closer (London)
Hammersmith
The Stage (UK)

"This 25th-anniversary production makes the audience appreciate why it was as successful as it was – it’s very tautly written, not a line is wasted, and also, at times, very funny – while acknowledging it’s a product of its time." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

"For the most part 'Jack Absolute Flies Again' is content to deal in comfortable nostalgia of the barrel-rolled hair and bomber-jacket variety, familiar wartime tropes given a sitcom sheen. It’s always relatively entertaining, often very funny indeed, but its frothiness becomes tiresome after a while and it’s more celebratory than interrogative of the time it’s portraying." Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It becomes polemical towards the end, perhaps to its detriment. But it’s hard to argue with Comer’s performance, which is never less than captivating and impassioned. Full Review

The 47th (London)
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

The play is not an exercise in crystal ball-gazing, rather a reflection on the ripples caused by the Capitol attacks and the repercussions for American democracy...It’s Carvel who leaves the biggest impression, bestriding the production in a magnificent and grimly apposite fashion. Full Review

Cock (London)
West End
The Stage (UK)

Despite the best efforts of the cast, the characters always feel primarily like sexual chess pieces engaged in a game in which there can be only one victor. Full Review

Uncanny Valley
Clapham
The Stage (UK)

Conceived and directed by Stefan Kaegi, the show has an inevitable static quality...Uncanny Valley is a philosophical exercise as much as a technical one, less about robots than our own pre-programming. Full Review

Running with Lions
Hammersmith
The Stage (UK)

Michael Buffong’s production is solid rather than showy, but it hits all the emotional beats of the play and draws out its warmth...This is really a promising debut, a compassionate play about a family coming to terms with its past – and its future. Full Review

A Number (Old Vic)
Southwark
The Stage (UK)

Together, [Essiedu] and James immaculately capture the rhythm of Churchill’s writing. [Turner] draws more humour out of the play than one might expect. Full Review

Manor
Waterloo
The Stage (UK)

While director Fiona Buffini engineers a couple of moments of tension, the pacing is erratic and the plotting muddled. The play contains some richly written passages ... but at other times it’s blunt and heavy-handed. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

It’s an intentionally provocative play that coats its ugly premise with wit and words. The production feels almost too polished at times, but no less powerful for it. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Kramer’s play sometimes feels like it is a series of speeches, but they’re speeches still capable of making you sob...Kramer’s play is living history, written without the benefit of hindsight, and it remains undimmed by time. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

By opening the play out to multiple casts, it comes to feel more of a metatheatrical exercise – its dramatic mechanics more apparent – and less an eviscerating exploration of the universe. Full Review

Under Milk Wood
Waterloo
The Stage (UK)

This production captures some of that magic; it contains instances of comedy and pathos but some of the world-building lacks clarity and, at times, it falls awkwardly between two stools, breaking its spell. Full Review

J'Ouvert
West End
The Stage (UK)

Joseph’s writing captures the heat and colour of carnival, but also provides a more layered look at its history and political significance. Full Review

Walden
West End
The Stage (UK)

The play knits together a number of interesting and pertinent threads: about humankind’s responsibility to the world, but also about individuality and genetics, and the American thirst for expansion. Full Review

Harm
Shepherds Bush
The Stage (UK)

The play is at its best when it is at its darkest – when digging into the narrator’s sense of self-loathing, or highlighting how single, childless women can still be made to feel like pariahs. But it resists getting its hands really grubby – from sinking elbow-deep into the muck. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production It’s a finely crafted piece, with some lines sweet enough to drink, others capable of breaking you apart. Full Review

The Stage (UK)

While the production is not short of over-the-top pleasures, in this condensed version some of the subplots feels truncated and rushed...it seems to run out of steam.' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

Smith’s writing has a strong poetic style, a bold, bodily quality; it is full of ripples and echoes... Elizabeth Freestone’s production...is frustratingly restrained.' Full Review

The Welkin
Waterloo
The Stage (UK)

While the first half is beautifully calibrated, tight as a high wire, things slacken a bit in the second half...this audacious play’s strength lies in the richly textured picture it paints of these women and their lives...' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

A potent study of women, power and patriarchy...Hickson writes with her usual mix of wit, intelligence, empathy and a metallic clarity of thought, interlacing history with anachronism...' Full Review

The Stage (UK)

for a previous production Matthew Warchus’ production seems ... to want to have its Christmas cake and eat it. Many of the lines hit even harder now than they did in 2017, with Dickens’ ideas about society, and how it cares for its poor and vulnerable, ringing out like a bell. Full Review