Nelson Pressley

Nelson Pressley is a critic with Washington Times. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (11)
Noura
Midtown W
The Washington Post

for a previous production "Raffo’s restless, unpredictable riff on Henrik Ibsen’s 'A Doll’s House' and modern Iraq, of all things, shapes up as this festival’s best bet...Settle’s grand, simple staging at the Lansburgh Theatre and Raffo’s impassioned central performance command attention...The finish is torrential, and the portrait of a woman torn between cultures and family members is nearly searing...The slow crescendo and deep repercussions of 'Noura' make it the festival’s most ambitious and substantial premiere." Full Review

Draw the Circle
West Village
The Washington Post

for a previous production "Mashuq Mushtaq Deen has a good story to tell in 'Draw the Circle,' and a fresh way to tell it...Deen does good work switching vocal patterns and postures, but he’s more compassionate than chameleonic in his characterizations. Director Chay Yew keeps the lean performance percolating briskly...The story’s framework is simple yet striking, and more than a novelty: it’s an apt, big-hearted way to puzzle together many pieces of Deen’s journey." Full Review

The Washington Post

for a previous production "Davidman passionately throws his arms around the problem and wrestles, convinced that somehow something constructive can be done...The show, performed without intermission and with few slack passages, is a potent, heartfelt survey of histories and positions, and it grows increasingly intimate and even visually poetic the further in Davidman gets...'Wrestling Jerusalem' is anything but the last word on its issue; instead, it swings open the gate for the more particular festival stories to come." Full Review

The Metromaniacs
Midtown W
The Washington Post

for a previous production "STC's ingenious resurrection of an obscure 18th-century French comedy. This almost criminally enjoyable world premiere reunites director Kahn and Ives, the master adapter...What Ives treats us to is a juicy pileup of rivalries among a set of Paris 'metromaniacs,' or poetry addicts...Kahn’s production goes like a shot. The cast speaks brilliantly, hopping onto the high wire of Ives’s rhymes and nailing punch lines that glisten with classical flair and contemporary savvy." Full Review

ELF The Musical
Midtown W
The Washington Post

for a previous production "Director Sam Scalamoni’s production, with a lot of flat scenery by Christine Peters, is visually chintzy in its renderings of North Pole workshops and Manhattan skylines. It’s hard to describe the performances when the enterprise is so cartoonish; the actors all seem capable, yet they rarely get an opportunity to display much personal appeal...The show might not want to be anything more than a big silly toy, but it doesn’t spin. It’s wound too tight." Full Review

Washington Times

"A bold work of art, and stylistically the most daring piece of theater, to hit mainstream musicals in years. You gotta love it - and judging by the roars at a preview performance for critics and insiders last week, Broadway does. "The Lion King" - arguably the most expensive puppet show in history - is a long, imperfect musical. But it is also a dazzling, one-of-a-kind entertainment." Full Review

Handbagged
Midtown E
The Washington Post

for a previous production “Fast-paced..Comically self-aware...Buffini’s breezy script is laced with crosstalk, and it’s booby-trapped with rebellion...Buffini doesn’t seem to like Thatcher, but she gets how her muscular magnetism attracted followers hungry for a newly great Britain. The script has a prismatic quality; the light of history glints differently depending on who’s telling it. Buffini has fun shifting the attention around, and Rubasingham’s production is so sure-footed that the whole show shines.” Full Review

The Originalist
Midtown E
The Washington Post

for a previous production "The glory of Gero’s performance is how artfully it balances the actual man with the comic demands of John Strand’s crowd-pleasing play...Gero woos the crowd beautifully with a virtuosic blend of bluster, intellect and devastating wit...Rather than being strictly realistic, Cat gives robust, unadulterated voice to Scalia’s critics...It may be that rare play of political ideas that can woo audiences in territory marked blue, red, or purple." Full Review

Kerrmoor (FringeNYC)
East Village
The Washington Post

for a previous production "'Kerrmoor' is clear as a bell, aided by McCully’s sturdy, authentic performance in the central role...The dialogue rings with twang and rapture as Agatha’s daughter Lorna and Lorna’s half-sister Kylie get as wild and wide-eyed (and manipulative) as the girls in Arthur Miller’s 'The Crucible.' The old faiths and bigotries run deep in this insular setting, and the earnest 'Kerrmoor' is a kind of exorcism...The single-minded protest and rites of 'Kerrmoor' run their swift course efficiently." Full Review

The Washington Post

for a previous production "The cinematic style nicely frames the parade of character studies. Bit by bit, Lewis’s argument comes into sharp relief in a show that is blessedly free of finger-wagging. The project does presuppose an audience interested in a literary mode of religious explanation, and to judge by the rapt crowd at Saturday afternoon’s largely full performance, 'Divorce' is reaching its congregation." Full Review

The Washington Post

for a previous production "It’s frankly schmaltzy, and it’s barely written — it zips through selected moments of Hines’s life, creating a mood more than telling a story. Patrons not smitten by the show’s throwback music might find 'Tappin’ ' a trifle thin. But Hines rarely chooses songs you don’t want to hear, and the anecdotes seem to gush out of him. When he finally lets his feet do the talking for a few rhythmic minutes near the end, it’s a pleasure to be in the company of a shameless, ebullient vaudeville heart." Full Review