Peter Marks

Peter Marks is a critic with The Washington Post. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (147)
Dana H. (Broadway)
Midtown W
The Washington Post

"A mesmerizing act of electronic ventriloquism...It’s hard to say which is more absorbing: Dana’s story or O’Connell’s uncanny portrayal, requiring her to reproduce in perfect alignment with the audiotape every cough, pause, giggle and slap of the chair in which she sits for much of the 75 minutes of the piece." Full Review

The Washington Post

"In this beautiful capstone work, though, the sense is not so much a resolution as a dissolving; the characters of “What Happened?” have become unmoored, as if the isolation of the pandemic has caused some permanent psychic dislocation." Full Review

The Washington Post

"It’s an illuminating exercise in both self-reflection and groupthink — and an example of how, as audiences emerge from personal hibernation, theater is seeking novel kinds of visceral engagement." Full Review

The Washington Post

"Listen up, Bob Dylan fans: You’ll want to journey to Broadway’s ‘North Country'" Full Review

Medea (BAM)
Brooklyn
The Washington Post

"Beware. This stylish ‘Medea’ adaptation offers no escape, for Rose Byrne or for you." Full Review

Grand Horizons
Midtown W
The Washington Post

"Tried and true formulas work in ‘A Soldier’s Play’ and ‘Grand Horizons’" Full Review

Greater Clements
Upper W Side
The Washington Post

"‘Greater Clements’ is the best new play of the year" Full Review

The Inheritance
Midtown W
The Washington Post

‘The Inheritance’ is epic in length, but not always in satisfaction" Full Review

The Washington Post

"David Byrne brings his entertaining brain to Broadway in ‘American Utopia,’ and it’s totally dope" Full Review

The Washington Post

for a previous production "‘Slave Play’ is a funny, scalding, walk along the boundary between black and white in America" Full Review

The Great Society
Upper W Side
The Washington Post

"In ‘The Great Society,’ history marches numbingly on, and on, and on, and on" Full Review

The Washington Post

"Jake Gyllenhaal is a stage animal for sure. But he needs more feral turf in ‘Sea Wall/A Life.’" Full Review

The Washington Post

for a previous production "This reworked incarnation, under Alex Timbers’s direction, breathes slightly more enjoyably even as it remains too faithful to the pumped-up inclinations of book writers Scott Brown and Anthony King and composer-lyricist Eddie Perfect...On the seriously plus side, two inferior songs have been cut from Act 2...It will never be among my favorite musicals, but I bet there will be a healthy and less-encumbered cheering section for it in New York." Full Review

Tootsie (NYC)
Midtown W
The Washington Post

“Embraceably funny...The sublime Santino Fontana not only gets to strut his farcical stuff, but also sings, amazingly well, in two registers...With a genuinely witty book by Robert Horn and an engaging score by David Yazbek...“Tootsie” is the tuneful winner this Broadway season has been desperate for. It’s a good-natured, conventionally assured book musical of the golden-age variety, expertly directed by Scott Ellis, with a clown car’s worth of comic actors." Full Review

The Washington Post

"Effecting a not-entirely-convincing working-class London accent, Lane gamely tries to make hay of the tedious bluster of Mac’s conceit, about the bloody mess we’re all now in, and how we deal with the aftermath...An attenuated mess of a black comedy, partly in rhymed couplets and lacking even a scabrous sort of gleefulness, strands a theatergoer for 90 minutes in a restless state of ennui...Dramatic dissonance is one thing. An entire evening of flat notes is another." Full Review

The Washington Post

“The lugubrious new Broadway musical that takes us to hell and back, via a jazz and blues-fueled account of the Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice...The embellishing of the myth, through an assembly line of sound-alike songs and mechanistic dance sequences, rambles on...and, only occasionally, with any inspirational joy, or heart...The plot comes across as an accessory to the production’s style rather than the other way around. It’s not a winning formula.” Full Review

The Washington Post

"Confoundingly muddled evening...On the evidence of this latest version, no one is going to go near this thorny brute of a play there again anytime soon. Not that Jackson isn’t an inspired choice for Lear...Little effort has gone into creating the impression that all these characters occupy the same space or to establishing with any secure command of temporal logistics where we are at any given moment." Full Review

The Washington Post

"Time — more than a century, actually — really does seem to fly at the Park Avenue Armory, home at the moment to a spellbinding exercise in storytelling, as it can only be done on a stage...Visually, it’s all remarkable...Beale, Miles and Godley, bearing absolutely no resemblance to one another, convince us utterly that they are all cut from the same Lehman cloth; they propel the story with a force that feels aerodynamic." Full Review

The Washington Post

"A new, first-class Broadway version that at times raises its sparkle quotient to incandescence. Director Scott Ellis and choreographer Warren Carlyle apply so much sizzling flair to their revival of the 1948 show that it has restored my faith in efforts to mount golden-age musicals with books that have, well, seen better days...There is that creamy O’Hara coloratura, too, to sing us all into happy submission and apply to this revival an apropos adjective: unmissable." Full Review

Freestyle Love Supreme
West Village
The Washington Post

“’Freestyle Love Supreme’ is the brainchild of Miranda...It’s a delightfully wit-laced evening of comedy rap devised on the spot by a tight cadre of performers, backed by a pair of equally deft instrumentalists...The fast-thinking geniuses who turn audience suggestions into hilarious, rapid-fire rhyme leave you feeling happy...The show is reinvented at every outing, and the performers so seamlessly transform even the most absurd ideas into rapped stories.” Full Review

The Washington Post

for a previous production "It’s useful to have an actor of a certain gold-plated integrity like Daniels when you take on a piece as deeply embedded in the American consciousness as 'To Kill a Mockingbird'...To build a play in 2018 on these notions requires a writer like Sorkin who can toggle between the radically different mind-set of 1934, when the story takes place; 1960, when the novel was published; and today...Director Bartlett Sher has assembled a terrific cast." Full Review

Network (NYC)
Midtown W
The Washington Post

"Chayefsky’s celebrated screenplay is...dolled up with all sorts of distracting gadgetry by that maestro of fancy doodads, Ivo van Hove...One of the play’s multiple themes is how we’re controlled by TV and the other gizmos we’ve created. The fact that, at times, van Hove forces our eye toward the screens, even when humans are standing front and center before us, is one of the production’s better jokes. But Cranston is the only human in a cast 23 strong with any power to move us." Full Review

The Washington Post

“Maybe the most haunting thing about ‘Beetlejuice’ is the creepy feeling of inspiration run amok...Overcaffeinated, overstuffed, and virtually charmless...The movie’s morbid laughter in the face of death has been replaced by juvenile tee-heeing at the ways Beetlejuice can shock the other characters with his bawdy naughtiness...Predictably peppy pop score...Before ‘Beetlejuice’ makes its way to the Winter Garden...a trip back to a lab where they fix musicals may be in order.” Full Review

The Ferryman (NYC)
Midtown W
The Washington Post

"'The Ferryman' is a searing social document...A riveting work of art...Butterworth weaves an enthralling tapestry of melodrama, wryness, and suspense...Butterworth and Mendes have masterminded 'The Ferryman' for maximum wallop, and the actors, to a person, are brilliant executors...One of the most ferociously rewarding climaxes of my playgoing experience. That sensation, of a tension released by consummate storytelling, is what a theater lover lives for." Full Review

The Washington Post

"The marvelous aural effect created on the stage by writer-director Conor McPherson and 16 other cast members is of hardship and disappointment ennobled by the healing power of song...The voices of the playwright and songwriter coalesce harmoniously; they seem to be in conversation with each other...'North Country' is a breakthrough for the songbook form...If this wrenching gaggle of souls doesn’t migrate next to a home uptown, then it will be Broadway that is the poorer." Full Review

The Washington Post

"A sublime 3½-hour dash through the history of American capitalism that passes in what feels like no time." Full Review

The Washington Post

"The play instead comes across as the embodiment of an escalating frustration over how to make Black lives matter...The magnetic Hill and Smallwood infuse Moses and Kitch with exuberant physicality; though they create distinct characters, the ineffable, mutual dependence they conjure is their chief accomplishment." Full Review

The Washington Post

"Such an exercise could be invasive or cringe-inducing. But the cards guide participants so gently through the sessions lasting about 45 minutes, and the communication that they provoke can be so sweet and surprising that it all comes across as a joyful resetting of one’s bearings for being out in the world." Full Review

West Side Story
Midtown W
The Washington Post

"This gutsy new ‘West Side Story’ is unlike any you’ve seen — and it’s exhilarating" Full Review

The Washington Post

"Tried and true formulas work in ‘A Soldier’s Play’ and ‘Grand Horizons’" Full Review

The Washington Post

"Laura Linney, going it alone on Broadway as both a mother and her estranged daughter" Full Review

The Washington Post

"You oughta know this about ‘Jagged Little Pill’: It’s hard to swallow as a Broadway musical." Full Review

The Washington Post

"As rock-star portrayals go, it doesn’t get any better than Adrienne Warren as Tina Turner" Full Review

Soft Power
East Village
The Washington Post

"Ever wondered how China sees America? ‘Soft Power’ offers amusing ideas." Full Review

The Washington Post

"Miranda and company devise raps on the spot. And you’re in your happy place." Full Review

The Washington Post

"‘Hercules’ proves strong enough to lift all of Central Park, but only for a few days." Full Review

The Washington Post

"Will you love ‘Moulin Rouge!’ as a stage musical? Well, you’ll certainly fall in like." Full Review

Ink
Midtown W
The Washington Post

“An engrossing, richly detailed play...A smart sequence that runs through how a story goes from typewriter to hot type to newsprint is highly entertaining...The impressive Carvel portrays Murdoch as sly and ruthless, but Graham’s idea is not a caricature by any means; the publisher is a scrupulous businessman...If the gutter is where readers wanted their news to wallow, Murdoch and company were content to lead them to it. Here’s hoping that lovers of plays...will want to follow, too." Full Review

Burn This
Midtown W
The Washington Post

"Absolutely delightful, witnessing Adam Driver, in an utterly captivating turn...The slightly discordant element for the audience here is forming the belief that this woman of inordinate self-control would have the patience for such a potential romantic train wreck; Russell never gives the impression that her Anna is capable of letting go to the degree that would seem necessary...Though, we are all so in the thrall of Driver...that we believe in his ability to turn Anna’s head. He’s such a na... Full Review

The Washington Post

"In the characterizations by John Lithgow as Bill and Laurie Metcalf as Hillary, under the direction of Joe Mantello, you’re treated to an engrossing psychological tennis match...With splendid assistance from two other actors — Zak Orth as Hillary pollster Mark Penn and Peter Francis James, materializing for a meetup as then-presidential candidate Barack Obama — the play sketches an emotional/professional mind-meld that might keep a panel of shrinks busy." Full Review

The Washington Post

"A vibrantly, cerebrally remastered golden-age musical that is held back a bit by some weak-tea singing and dancing...Some actors add twangy flourishes to their numbers, or caterwaul the high notes, which only put you in mind of better renditions you’ve heard, or that the voices aren’t quite up to the demands...What’s best in this ‘Oklahoma!’ is the morally ambiguous cue Fish develops so smartly from Rodgers and Hammerstein’s own narrative impulses." Full Review

The Washington Post

"It would be hard to identify a work for the theater with its finger more cogently and rewardingly on the pulse of America right now...The endearingly funny evening...puts you contentedly in mind of one of our inalienable rights: the pursuit of happiness...Schreck is key to the play’s advanced level of enchantment. It’s her self-effacing buoyancy that sustains the piece, even at the few moments when it teeters on the brink of excessive digression." Full Review

The Washington Post

"Buoyed by the suave choreography of Sergio Trujillo and thrill-a-minute performances by such stars-in-the-making as Jeremy Pope and Ephraim Sykes, 'Ain’t Too Proud' proves to be two or three cuts above the standard-issue anthology pop musical...The propulsive narrative of 'Ain’t Too Proud' not only reflects Morriseau’s understanding of how to invest an audience in the Temptations’ emotional spirals, but also McAnuff’s savvy at packing the music into every available nook and cranny." Full Review

The Washington Post

"'Be More Shrill' would be a better title for director Stephen Brackett’s heinously overamplified and overacted production...You get the feeling that Iconis’s score — with lyrics often resorting to doggerel — and Tracz’s satire-laced book might have retained some measure of charm in less hyperventilating style and more intimate surroundings...2½ hours of teenage insecurities turned into pop opéra bouffe make for a patience-trying endurance test." Full Review

The Washington Post

"Hawke proves to be the roaring featured attraction in Roundabout Theatre Company’s revival of Shepard’s 1983 absurdist comedy, directed with a sometimes uncertain grasp on the material by James Macdonald...Dano pulls up somewhere short of convincing as a viable match for Lee. Even so, this 'True West' has its tickling rewards, particularly in the early going, when the menace in the play is at its most nerve-racking." Full Review

The Jungle
Brooklyn
The Washington Post

"Anyone who is capable of a scintilla of human decency could not help but be moved by the human face this intense and powerfully immersive play puts on people fleeing oppression in their homelands...To be sure, the two-hour, 45-minute production has its excesses...The drama’s success in imbuing with personality those trapped in the camp...may be its most important achievement. No weak link exists in the 18-member ensemble, and some actors offer particularly vivid accounts." Full Review

The Washington Post

"This jukebox musical — the latest in a burgeoning genre that will one day no doubt run out its streak with a tribute show to Milli Vanilli — is so devoid of insight that it takes some of its cliched pop lyrics for earnest commentary, on Cher’s rinse-and-repeat career of rise and fall and rise and fall and...Mackie’s sequin-drenched creations, tacky to the max, make the appropriate splashes in this oddly pasted-together evening." Full Review

The Washington Post

"Director Neugebauer and company generate all of the evening’s requisite tenseness...Lonergan’s ear for the crosscurrents of love and recrimination is as fine as that of any American dramatist. His skill gets a useful workout in 'The Waverly Gallery,' which may be his richest play, emotionally speaking. That Neugebauer forces some unneeded window dressing onto the proceedings is unfortunate...May compels audiences to the belief that they have found another great dramatic actress:” Full Review

The Washington Post

“’Lifespan of a Fact’s’ confrontation boils down in...Silverman’s lucidly handled, 90-minute production to a test of wills and three distinct perspectives articulated by a trio of hardheaded characters...The play would well have been a yawner had not these characters all been generously and sympathetically inhabited. Jones couldn’t be better...And Radcliffe provides the canny pivotal performance that demonstrates why the world needs sticklers.” Full Review

The Washington Post

“A heart-piercing production as sublime as I’ve ever seen Chekhov performed...The actors...speak in intentionally normal tones of voice, and if you have trouble catching every word, Nelson has said he doesn’t much care...By distilling the text to a seemingly fresh variety of conversational truthfulness...Vanya’s silent suffering feel brutally real. And when in this instance Vanya’s patience finally runs out, Sanders’s explosion is nothing less than cataclysmic.” Full Review