Robert Kahn

Robert Kahn is a critic with WNBC. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (154)
WNBC

"Directed by Michael Mayer, whose penchant for pizazz pairs nicely with Moore’s Lefties-Home-Companion storytelling style, 'Surrender' is a slick and engaging mash-up of entertainment and politics. It’s also very much a call-to-arms for civic involvement, in a room where Moore is preaching to the more-or-less converted...I can think of a few places the audience wouldn’t be nearly as friendly as New York, which would make for an even more electrifying event." Full Review

WNBC

"This 'Dream' is just classic Delacorte eye candy. DeBessonet has assembled an enviable cast for a lush production of the multi-pronged Shakespeare comedy set in an enchanted forest...Nielsen’s fans will delight in her comically twitchy presence...The final wedding scene is a rousing affair with the Mechanicals performing to the Duke’s delight, and a string of festive bulbs raised behind the stage." Full Review

Pipeline
Upper W Side
WNBC

"I submit willingly to a drama like 'Pipeline' because, for all the conflict and angst among its characters, each portrait feels true, and justified and genuine...Dominique Morisseau’s intense and poetic new play ...'Pipeline' powers through its 90 minutes under the steady direction of Lileana Blain-Cruz...Pittman is dynamic, a multifaceted and relatable character." Full Review

1984 (Broadway)
Midtown W
WNBC

“An assault on the senses, pointedly designed to run over an audience like a tank crushing resistors in its path…To some degree, the strobe lights, gunshots and gore become such a distraction from the story that they threaten to overwhelm its dire message about government run amok…Sturridge and Wilde are very good...I don’t routinely suggest it’s essential for theatergoers to know source material before seeing its adaptations. Here, though, it’s a good idea.” Full Review

WNBC

"Eustis isn’t going for subtlety...Populated with actors from no fewer than three of TV’s politically styled dramas, this 'Caesar' builds on anti-Trump asides forced into new children’s musicals this season and addressed in full-scale works like 'Building the Wall'...It’s shocking to see a band of conspirators in modern dress take turns plunging a dagger into the body of a leader so clearly modeled on America’s own...Henry's Caesar blusters and leers with every line...It’s quite a performance." Full Review

Venus
Midtown W
WNBC

"An adventurous revival...Jah is marvelous here as a woman imprisoned, yet not wholly a victim...Most of the actors in Signature’s production, which features carnival-like and sometimes too-cluttered direction by Lear deBessonet, play multiple roles...Empowered? Feminist? Pragmatic? In control? Jah’s Venus is all those things in degrees, in spite of the choices she makes, and the choices that are cruelly made for her." Full Review

WNBC

"Nora damaged a lot of people when she left home at the end of Ibsen’s 'A Doll’s House.' Roughly a century and a half later, playwright Lucas Hnath is mining that pain for comic gold in a star-studded sequel (of sorts)...Metcalf's marvelous as a woman naturally good at wheedling and manipulating...Cooper exudes a rueful, self-aware depth that keeps us sympathizing with him...We can only imagine what fun Hnath had cooking up a story about how Nora reaped what he, at least, thinks she sowed." Full Review

WNBC

“Janney is a well-cast successor to Stockard Channing…It’s Hawkins who is the revelation as the deluded man so invested in his web of deceit that even he loses track of his identity…John Benjamin Hickey is great as the status-obsessed, acquisitive art dealer who can’t believe his wife has become enchanted by a petty criminal. Trip Cullman’s direction is peppy.” Full Review

WNBC

"Powerful and chilling...The story is filled with delicious twists and turns up until the end. But the fun in this production is watching these two extraordinary and captivating actresses at play, no matter which role she's tackling. Each at the height of her game, the veteran performers were clearly given latitude to interpret their characters as they will...Both prove to be equally effective in either role — a sign of each actress' talent and the production's overall perfection." Full Review

War Paint
Midtown W
WNBC

"A smart portrayal of the obstacles faced by a pair of America's earliest female entrepreneurs...Benefits foremost from the remarkable symmetry between its leads...The score is tuneful and catchy, winding up to a pair of bittersweet releases for the stars...Good God, the women’s voices are in astounding condition...Their meeting is something of a misty-eyed anticlimax...'War Paint,' mostly, is bliss and makeup." Full Review

Amelie
Midtown W
WNBC

"Well-intentioned but uninspiring...A somewhat faithful book by Craig Lucas and a banal, disappointing score from Daniel Messé and Nathan Tysen...'Amélie' never seems to figure out what it wants to be, and its flaws lie in a combination of inconsistent directing by the usually reliable Pam MacKinnon and charmless, generic compositions...A closing number between the two leads, 'Where Do We Go From Here?' is promising, but it arrives too late." Full Review

WNBC

"An elaborate staging, which at times vies for attention with the talented cast...Briones is the focal point of this 'Miss,' part-character and part-narrator, emceeing his way across Asia with gyrating hips and snarky asides...Noblezada is effective...The helicopter scene remains phenomenal...My issues with 'Miss Saigon' aren’t deal-breakers: the orchestrations sometimes unintentionally subvert the presence of the actors. And the initial bond between Kim and Chris isn’t sketched out enough." Full Review

WNBC

“A missed opportunity…Byrne’s sung-through score is occasionally anthemic, with touches of Christian rock. It’s generically upbeat and, at the same time, frequently overwrought. The silver lining here is Jo Lampert, as the beautifully androgynous title character…There isn’t ever enough connective tissue between Byrne’s songs to make us care about the girl.” Full Review

WNBC

"Field is not as misty as other Amandas we’ve met. Indeed, she is sharp and declarative in recounting for her kids the gentleman callers who paid her attention in years past. It makes her later delusions all the more resonant...Gold puts his stamp on 'Menagerie' with both hyper-realistic elements and a minimalist set so barren it can only leave us to focus on the actors—the juxtaposition of styles makes this 'Menagerie' as interesting as any I’ve seen." Full Review

WNBC

“Secomb’s performance is threatening and physical, and you’ll wow at the way he becomes unbuttoned and lost in the world during the macabre and cherished first act climax…All the familiar numbers are well-executed…Candlelight, a three-person orchestra give the production its atmosphere without any extravagant pyrotechnics…Here, we get a new twist on an old favorite, a particularly satisfying staging that’s a treat for all of the senses, even taste.” Full Review

The Object Lesson
East Village
WNBC

"Sobelle is inclined to ponder the weight and meaning of the possessions that come into our lives and how they form some unifying thread that helps define us...We're left with a sense of how our stuff interplays with our spiritual lives, the meanings we impart on inanimate objects. Phone conversations are little wisps that vanish into the ether, out of our grasp. But plastic lobsters are forever." Full Review

Yen
West Village
WNBC

"Hedges is excellent here as a boy who copes with life by being prickly and snappish, but who is essentially introspective and caring underneath…Smith is a gifted actor, who makes us believe his storms of devotion and resentment are coming from the gut…Graynor’s Maggie shows her bottomless neediness, without turning us against her.” Full Review

The Present
Midtown W
WNBC

"If at times illuminated with an item of bold lingerie or sniping remark, most of the color in director John Crowley’s frenzied, engaging production comes from the party balloons...Blanchett’s diva-like—a woman in increasingly desperate straits, who yet somehow never seems like a desperate woman...Crowley keeps things moving quickly, given the number of connections he’s obliged to juggle. 'The Present' is ultimately more coherent than this season’s earlier Chekhov offering." Full Review

Sweet Charity
Midtown W
WNBC

"Sutton Foster may well have been born to play Charity. Is there an actress more adept at toggling between hopefulness and heartbreak with just the bat of an eyelash? The New Group’s 'Sweet Charity' is a bittersweet, but sublime revival…Leigh Silverman takes us through all the steps of the classic musical…'Where Am I Going?' closes 'Sweet Charity' on a tender note that brought the company an ovation, and makes for a gut-wrenching reminder that this is no happy-go-lucky tuner." Full Review

WNBC

"'Terms' takes the points of highest emotional intensity from its source material, and strings them together, without the quiet interludes the film used to help us ease into the characters…Ringwald isn’t a prickly wisecracker, like MacLaine, but she’s solid here as an opinionated woman too involved in the life of her daughter…I enjoyed Brown as the sloppy space musketeer, with all his leering, heavy breathing and slouching…Endearing? Sometimes. But not a must-see." Full Review

WNBC

"Fugard’s drama is slow to unreel, but builds to a confrontation audiences will find absorbing, no matter that Apartheid ended a decade after the play’s debut. Brown is compassionate and believable...Ngaujah, as the more mercurial Willie, has nice chemistry with counterpart...In Robbins’ interpretation, Hally is never very likable, coming off as a young Napoleon from the start. Because his Hally is such a brat, the play is denied a larger sense of any escalating ferocity within the boy." Full Review

Falsettos
Midtown W
WNBC

"'Falsettos'—that very New York tear-jerker of a musical masterpiece by James Lapine and William Finn—gets an extraordinarily satisfying and modern-seeming revival...There isn’t a throwaway song among the 35-plus in this grand affair...Is there a theme more universal than the mystery of why some people fall in love? This eloquent take bridges age and cultural boundaries and is as timeless as they come." Full Review

Plenty
East Village
WNBC

"Weisz is mesmerizing...but the award-winning actress would have been better served by a more coherently directed and designed production...In Leveaux’s interpretation, I was particularly unsure what time or place it was...Weisz, at least, offers a consistent portrayal of a woman who is manic, manipulative and hollow. The character’s arc is devastating, but—and I mean this in the best possible way—her performance is like a slow-motion car crash from which you can’t avert your eyes." Full Review

Love, Love, Love
Midtown W
WNBC

"So … is it better to be born smart, or lucky? That’s the question I found myself coming back to in the days after 'Love, Love, Love,' which finally proves to be making a point—and asking hard questions—about entitlement, fortune and circumstance...'Love, Love, Love' left me both amused, and consumed by thoughts about fortune and fate. This marks two seasons in a row with an engaging and fast-paced play by Mike Bartlett on our shores." Full Review

Heisenberg
Midtown W
WNBC

"Stage veterans Mary-Louise Parker and Denis Arndt are the skilled interpreters for Stephens’s rich two-hander, a spot-on rumination about joy and sadness, and how either can seep into proceedings where neither may have been anticipated...It’s hard to take your eyes off Parker, who allows us to see Georgie as a multidimensional human being...As Alex, Arndt is spare and understated...Like their relationship, 'Heisenberg' is more than the sum of its parts." Full Review

A Parallelogram
Midtown W
WNBC

“You can see the ideas of class and status explored in 'Clybourne Park' percolating in this earlier existential comedy…Director Michael Greif allows Norris’s misanthropy to creep slowly into the proceedings…‘A Parallelogram’ is a dark piece that argues we’re unlikely to emerge from the primordial muck of our own creation.” Full Review

WNBC

"This is a sometimes confusing, endlessly interesting staging that is full of color and scent...The vivid and fully inhabited performances—especially from Isaac—make for a stellar distraction from the challenging matters of staging...Viewed as a vehicle for memorable performances, this is an awesome 'Hamlet'—just note, it’s not a remotely 'classic' one." Full Review

Marvin's Room
Midtown W
WNBC

"Gratifying and affecting...I particularly marveled at the way Taylor processed any bad news that comes Bessie’s way. She segues briskly from shock to resilience...It’s easy, as well, to empathize with Garofalo’s Lee...The American Airlines Theatre isn’t a particularly forgiving venue for a story quite so intimate, but designer Jellinek succeeds in taming the open space...'Marvin’s Room' is at its finest when reminding us that memory is a fierce, potent counterpoint to fear of the unknown." Full Review

WNBC

"Third Rail and Lincoln Center? It’s an alliance that sounds unholy at first blush, but ultimately proves felicitous...Some of the segments evolve into indulgent performance art pieces that unnecessarily bog down 'Ghost Light'...On the other hand, Third Rail is more liberal here letting audience members 'get our hands dirty,' something I wasn’t anticipating...What theatergoer wouldn’t be enticed by a backstage pass to this opulent venue, seasoned with just a touch of the supernatural?" Full Review

The End of Longing
West Village
WNBC

“A sitcom-like rom-com that, regrettably, is neither amorous nor very funny…Many times the plot strains credulity…Perry at times seems uncomfortable with his own material, setting up jokes without waiting for the lines to sink in…There are glimpses of genuine humor and humanity along the way, particularly in the closing monologue Perry has written for himself, but they’re not enough to sustain matters…Derek McClane’s set is one of the best things here.” Full Review

Pacific Overtures
East Village
WNBC

"A spare and serene story that seems particularly relevant in a day when nations everywhere are reexamining stances on globalization...'Pretty Lady,' one of my favorite songs from the score, is handled beautifully, with the slaying of British soldiers at song’s end left mostly to the imagination...'Pacific Overtures' is a complicated musical, even by Sondheim standards. But Doyle has shaped a delicate production that’s comparatively easy to parse." Full Review

Bandstand
Midtown W
WNBC

“It is about some material that doesn't normally get the musical treatment, and that’s the show’s biggest selling point…Osnes brings considerable stage presence to her role…The trajectory of Taylor’s book is largely standard, and occasionally witty by virtue of self-awareness at how corny the jokes are…‘Bandstand’ deserves props for exploring serious subject matter without the distraction of a political message. Cott and Osnes do their best to sell it.” Full Review

WNBC

"More often than it should, 'Charlie' fails children when trying to speak to adults, and vice versa...An inability to hit the right tone and sustain it is a serious problem...The music is a combination of other songs from the film and mostly bland new work by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman...For all its attempts to recreate the delight of Roald Dahl’s story, it left me with something of a toothache." Full Review

WNBC

"'Groundhog Day' shares with 'Matilda' both an intriguing darkness and enough on-stage razzle-dazzle to seize your attention and hold it across two generally gut-busting acts...Director Warchus stages most scenes with vibrancy, particularly a car chase sequence...It’s marvelously good fun. As is, for the most part, all of 'Groundhog Day.' The musical is mostly consistent with the devilish humor in its cinematic predecessor, and Karl is a magnetic leading man.” Full Review

Present Laughter
Midtown W
WNBC

“A talented cast in a rather plodding revival…It’s fantastic to see Kline perform…He is still the master of bumbling and pomposity, but this performance doesn’t radiate pep and vigor…Patel gives a strange performance...Director von Stuelpnagel might have asked him to dial it back a notch…Any opportunity to see this kind of cast doing a Coward play with such high production values is worth seeing. I’m just not 100 percent convinced this is the ‘Present’ anybody was expecting.” Full Review

Sweat
Midtown W
WNBC

"Nottage eloquently captures the malaise among a group of longtime coworkers at a Berks County, Pennsylvania, mill...'Sweat' should be hailed for its visceral performance by Johanna Day...'Sweat' positively smokes through its two-hour-plus run...Nottage obviously hit on something vital in her research—with 20/20 hindsight. 'Sweat' gives off a tangible vibe, and if some better understood the issues raised by this play before the election, they wouldn’t have been surprised by the outcome." Full Review

WNBC

"I can see why 'The Price' isn’t staged as frequently as the Miller classics. The second act spins into an exhausting cyclone of old slights and misunderstandings to justify the silences between siblings. Director Terry Kinney does his best to keep things reeled in, but some of the interaction between the brothers borders on tedious...In the hands of a quartet as skilled as this, what we’re left remembering finally is not Miller’s art, but something of a master class in great performing." Full Review

WNBC

"A dignified, often funny new musical...Some of the characters are real; others are recognized to be composite sketches of the people whom writers Sankoff and Hein met. Inevitably, many of the portrayals feel like stock characters but the acting is excellent all around...'Come From Away' manages to find a spiritual angle to a horrific story, depicting the goodness in humanity while still allowing us room for the feelings of loneliness and fear that will always be connected to that time." Full Review

Significant Other
Midtown W
WNBC

"An endearing romantic comedy...Glick has fully realized his character...One word for this performance? Relatable...Barrie’s earning deserved accolades for this role, and it’s because of her unsaccharine performance...These actors have had time to steep in their roles, something we see manifest in silly, spastic, surprisingly well-choreographed dance sequences at assorted bachelorette parties. The piece ends in a sincere fashion." Full Review

The Penitent
Chelsea
WNBC

"Mamet’s play is often a jumble of non-cohesive ideas, but it still holds together better than recent pieces such as 'The Anarchist' and 'China Doll.' Viewed as an indictment of journalism or the law—take your pick—'The Penitent' is timely and exciting and, in the best of ways, awfully depressing...Overall, my response here was warm-ish. Some themes pop up like a muddled game of socioreligious whack-a-mole, but the play itself entertains and boasts a variety of interesting performances." Full Review

Sunset Boulevard
Midtown W
WNBC

"Aside from the enormous orchestra—and perhaps a bulbous chandelier that makes the one from 'Phantom' seem like a toddler’s night light—there’s little here to distract from Close’s mesmerizing Norma, or Lloyd Webber’s pop friendly score...Michael Xavier stands out as writer Joe Gillis...The musical is over the top, and we remain head over heels for Close’s so-very-delicate Norma Desmond." Full Review

WNBC

"An artful and melodic staging directed by Ruben Santiago-Hudson...The marvelous Thompson is dignified, but not unyielding...Michael Potts is a firecracker as Turnbo...Stage vets Harvy Blanks, Anthony Chisholm and Ray Anthony Thomas provide strong support...Wilson’s vehicle is a group of men driving second-class cars, but tired of being treated like second-class citizens. The MTC's ensemble does a glorious job bringing home that message." Full Review

In Transit
Midtown W
WNBC

"'In Transit' takes that most harped-on of artistic cliches—it’s the journey, not the destination—and builds it out, with a superior cast and some catchy music...Some of the storylines played out unpredictably in the best of ways. At other times, 'In Transit' settled into overly worn devices...'In Transit' manages to create a reality-distortion field that left me feeling the MTA isn’t the hostile environment I know it all too well to be...Go ahead and swipe your MetroCard." Full Review

Dead Poets Society
East Village
WNBC

"Jason Sudeikis makes a convincing stage debut...Director John Doyle, the CSC chief and respected Sondheim interpreter, has, as is his way, stripped down 'Dead Poets' to the essentials...Mann and Pais both bring sensitivity to the stage. Cody Kostro is equally on point as their rebellious classmate Charlie Dalton...'Dead Poets Society' stands on its own as an effective work of drama, even for a generation of audiences who may have no idea what preceded it." Full Review

WNBC

''The Great Comet' will be lauded for its innovative and transformative approach to storytelling...Malloy’s score is heavily influenced by Russian folk and classical music, and then underlined with powerful electro-pop...At times I’ll admit to finding some of it inaccessible...'The Great Comet' team has managed something unusual for Broadway, an intimate and affecting musical that can really be said to have populist appeal...Bravo." Full Review

Sweat
Midtown W
WNBC

for a previous production "The story is suspenseful but hardly new, and certainly a fixture of our daily election season media diet...All the characters are honorable people who want to put in an honest day's work and be respected accordingly, though they're given varying degrees of likability. 'Sweat' is a remarkably nimble and lucid drama, and for that reason alone I’m probably guilty of having expected profound wisdom—instead, it left me more upset than enlightened. All these good questions, with no easy answers." Full Review

A Life
Midtown W
WNBC

"Features an unsettling performance by theater mainstay David Hyde Pierce, as an everyman gay New Yorker in his mid-50s...Single (again) and with a caring social circle, Pierce’s Nate Martin, an ad agency proofreader, might well have been a stand-in for half the audience members at the recent performance I attended. He’s a guy like us. That’s relevant, given the startling direction 'A Life' veers off in, halfway through." Full Review

The Front Page
Midtown W
WNBC

"A swell revival of the frenetic comedy...Like the industry it satirizes, 'The Front Page' shows its age: The cast is jarringly lily white. Women are an afterthought...But, the pros in 'The Front Page' know how to manage the material and deliver an ink-stained good time. This is a period piece that hearkens back to a time when reporters carried flasks and an HR rep would be tossed out a window if she introduced a dialogue about harassment or proper workplace behavior." Full Review

WNBC

“An alternately despairing and giddy production…Roundabout’s 'Cherry Orchard' is visually in the past, but aurally in the present. The result is a mixed bag lacking symbolic resonance: The audience gets neither the tragic grandeur nor the comedy of the aristocracy seeing its dominance end. Rather, this is a portrait of one clueless family losing their fortune because they don’t know how to save a buck.” Full Review

WNBC

"Book yourself into 'Holiday Inn' just to see the pyrotechnics when tap whiz Corbin Bleu dances around, dodging faux explosives that are snapping at his feet. The 'High School Musical' star breathes into it new life...'Holiday Inn' is a lovely excuse to get lost in the Berlin chestnuts, particularly as they’ve been reimagined by choreographer Jones. The new story sometimes tries too hard to be charming and old-fashioned, but overall 'Holiday Inn' is a satisfying autumn offering." Full Review