Robin Riegelhaupt

Robin Riegelhaupt is a critic with Reviewing The Drama. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (70)
Reviewing The Drama

"Dramaturgically speaking there are some bumps, particularly in the second act. I saw the show early in its run, and there are a couple of numbers that stop the show in the wrong way; they seem out of place and/or aren't the full-fledged 11 o'clock numbers they aim to be. Still, I was taken with this celebration of a different take on beauty...'Bella' is telling another American story, not just by people who aren't usually in the story but about people who aren't usually part of the story." Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"The young and promising Hnath wrote an incredibly compelling play, bringing a modern sensibility and vernacular to this dusty classic. Much of the funny and persuasive dialogue is delivered in speeches, not unlike in Ibsen's play, yet this small but mighty cast palpably reacts to and connects with one another...The play belongs, though, to three-time Tony nominee Laurie Metcalf, who absolutely commands the stage." Full Review

Present Laughter
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

“This fun and fluffy play is filled to the brim with Noel Coward-esque wit, that kind of smart, snappy dialogue that you rarely hear anymore…We're lucky to have such a pitch-perfect production of such a play, and it's an embarrassment of riches to have this cast…For me, though, the absolute treat was getting to see Kevin Kline on stage…He's in top form…He zealously chews scenery, and doesn't miss an opportunity to turn a small moment or movement or look into a big laugh.” Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"While this has the classical elements of a well-made play (fidelity of time and location), those elements don't necessarily translate into riveting drama...The entire first act is exposition...The second act has more meat to it; this is where Miller gets into family drama, which is his bread and butter. It's certainly more interesting, but it still doesn't grab you...I've seen great actors elevate sub-par material, but that's not happening here." Full Review

The Light Years
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"I think what kept me engaged throughout the performance was the desire and hope that there would be something to engage with, something potent, some kind of payoff. That payoff never came...I suppose we're meant to be enchanted by the journey the families take...There were nice performances throughout, particularly from Cash, Lochtefeld, and Barnett, all of which added value to the performance. But it just didn't grab me." Full Review

If I Forget
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"Levenson forces audiences to confront what are, for many, long- and strongly-held beliefs, stances that have cemented as a matter of fact without critical thinking or questioning. Chiefly, he asks what it means to be a modern American Jew...Ultimately, the question driving 'If I Forget' is one Joey, the teenager, poignantly asks: 'What's my inheritance?' He's asking a literal question, but, of course, we can infer the broader question, what is my history, and where do I fit in?" Full Review

In Transit
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"What, at first, seems like a series of sketches turns into a full musical, with story arcs and characters for whom we root...What's so incredible, of course, is what these actors are doing with just their voices...The a cappella arrangements are astounding...'In Transit' tells a mostly simple and somewhat predictable story, but the New York insider jokes and incredible vocal prowess make it an enjoyable ride." Full Review

Sweet Charity
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"They don't make them like Sutton Foster anymore. Her go-for-broke comedic skills make her a quadruple threat...It gets darker at the end, which can throw you for a bit of a loop. But the darkness adds pathos and poignancy, and, in this case, relevance...Mostly, though, this is a great excuse to see one of our living legends in an iconic role, and make it her own...Thankfully, this production and choreographer Joshua Bergasse takes full advantage of his multi-talented leading lady." Full Review

Sweat
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

for a previous production "It is fascinating to watch this in an election year. With 'Sweat,' Nottage takes a sensitive, non-judgmental look at an oft-misunderstood segment of America...Through Nottage's fully drawn characters (and Kate Whoriskey's direction and the actors' performances), we see that there isn't something sinister about these people; they are not stupid or low class or deplorable. They are in transition; the world they knew and helped build is changing quickly." Full Review

Falsettos
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"I like many of the elements, starting with the cast...Many, if not all the songs, are smart and entertaining...But it just doesn't click for me as a musical. And I do think it's the material, not the production...Though it might have been groundbreaking and important in its time (helping it develop a cult following), this 'Falsettos' revival does not add anything to the conversation now, and there doesn't seem to be any urgency to it, a compelling reason to revisit it." Full Review

Plenty
East Village
Reviewing The Drama

"Rachel Weisz and Corey Stoll are terrific actors; we know this. Unfortunately, they have no chemistry on stage, leaving a void where there is supposed to be dramatic tension or intrigue. Neither of their characters is interesting, nor are the goings-on around them...Perhaps because of the lack of chemistry and interest, I found nothing compelling about the play, and, in fact, found the two-and-a-half hours I spent watching it to be tedious." Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"Godwin and Karam put an American spin on the Russian staple, making it vital and relevant. (Oh, and funny.)...Though she's doing fine work, Lane seems too young to be Lyubov...At the act break, I was most eagerly awaiting Perrineau's take on Yermolai's big moment and Keenan-Bolger having something to do other than fret. They delivered in spades...It's a vibrant, meaty production, one that feels just as urgent as the original 1904 Moscow Art Theatre production must have felt." Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"As the two women get to know each other and groove to the soul-shaking music we get treated to two vocal powerhouses raising the roof...Playwright Brant, one could argue, wrote 'Marie and Rosetta' to keep these women alive. That sense is palpable, and it gives the show pathos and dramaturgical heft, but for me, it was secondary. Witnessing Lewis and Jones give everything they have in service of these hallowed songs—and that alone—was worth every penny." Full Review

Engagements
Upper W Side
Reviewing The Drama

“It is a tidy and engaging play, well-written and well-executed. Though literary allusions abound, the dialogue sounds natural, and the detours into inner-monolgue-land offer fun and funny diversions. (Also fun diversions: the on-stage dance parties during scene transitions.) I like that Teitler is unafraid to show women behaving badly, reminding us that it's OK to be complicated; to not have it all figured out; to be a little messy.” Full Review

Runaways
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"I think most of the people carrying on about how amazing 'Runaways' is are really saying that the original production was groundbreaking, and that they like being able to revisit it. Without taking anything away from the work the young actors are doing, this didn't strike me as revelatory...To be sure, there are plenty of moving, poignant moments in it...But when the curtain came down and I left the theatre, 'Runaways' didn't stay with me." Full Review

Friend Art
Upper W Side
Reviewing The Drama

"The thing is, 'Friend Art' doesn't rise above the level its title suggests. There are moments that suggest Alvarez is a good writer and that the ideas in 'Friend Art' have potential...But Alvarez only gives us seeds. She doesn't delve into anything too deeply, and, in fact, seems to abandon what had been presented as the A-plot...I saw glimmers of hope for a character study of a modern young woman, and instead I got friend art.” Full Review

Shuffle Along
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

“Wolfe does a masterful job...Nothing feels rushed or packed in, and nothing feels pious or too precious. It is brought to life by an outstanding ensemble taking on tap living-legend Savion Glover's breakneck, pulsating, soulful choreography...Not a history lesson but a celebration of our history...and with George C. Wolfe's vision come to life, even more history is happening in Manhattan.” Full Review

Waitress (NYC)
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"There's a palpable sense of community among the women, which is different from what you typically see on stage and screen...There's a lot going on, but none of it feels rushed or cramped or overwhelming. Ideas—good and bad—are given time to develop and flourish in pop singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles's score...'Waitress' is groundbreaking in that it is the first musical on Broadway with an all-female creative team...Order up!" Full Review

Antlia Pneumatica
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"Washburn plays with time and memory so that even while we're watching 'Antlia Pneumatica', we are questioning what's real. As a theatrical experience, that's interesting...'Antlia Pneumatica' is a somewhat challenging play. As I was watching it, I didn't feel fully engrossed, but the more I think about it, the more I appreciate the experience..It's almost like you have to let this feast for your senses happen to you, and then let your memory take over." Full Review

Bright Star
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"The predictability is disappointing. Despite said predictability, the ending is moving because, well, we're humans...But the predictability equals a lack of investment, so while heading toward that moving ending, rather than rooting for the characters, you just feel like the train that's chugging along the top of the stage. It's not an entirely tedious ride, though...The stars of the show shine brightly, but the whole of 'Bright Star' just doesn't live up to the pedigree of its parts." Full Review

Familiar
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"Gurira has written a wonderful, universal play. The themes she explores in 'Familiar' are timeless, yet it's the details about this family and their roots that distinguish it from other family dramas. I call it a drama, but laughs abound…This is particularly noteworthy now, as many of the plays I've seen recently have felt unremarkable…'Familiar' pops. The performances are stellar, and Gurira's writing is smart...It's a modern classic." Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"While there's plenty of humor along the way, Lonnergan and director Pepe mine the emotional turmoil, building to an ending that is not only sincere and sensitive but one that feels earned. Along the way, I appreciated the great writing...And I loved Olyphant...He gives an engaged and engaging performance in this great, original American play." Full Review

Blackbird
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"'Blackbird' is intense. David Harrower's two-hander packs a lot of history and angst into the knock-down, drag-out war that makes up the 90-minute play...It's not fun. It absolutely will make you uncomfortable—how could it not? (Director Joe Mantello is sensitive and careful not to sensationalize the action.) Yet it's unfortunately relevant today...It's sad. It's infuriating. It will leave you shaken." Full Review

Smart People
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"I was finding the well-written 'Smart People.' directed by Tony winner Kenny Leon, to be a little trite. I don't mean to dismiss the characters' points of view or Ms. Diamond's voice; I mean that the conversations sounded like ones I'd heard before. I was eager for a fresh perspective. Toward the end of the play, I got it." Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"Shifts, reversals, and twists are all fine and can be thrilling when done right. This didn't work for me...It all felt entirely contrived. With a moment of non-fiction interpolated into this work of fiction, 'Our Mother's Brief Affair' seems more like a writing exercise (for the playwright) or a brain teaser (for the audience) than a well-crafted play." Full Review

Somebody's Daughter
Upper W Side
Reviewing The Drama

"There are specifics about family relationships in Asian culture...yet what it means to be somebody's daughter is universal...I was thoroughly engaged in these daughters' stories and found myself unexpectedly moved toward the end. Alex's journey is part coming of age, and deals with first love; I usually groan at such story lines, finding them trite, but not this time...I was comforted to see the way these women grew and came to terms with being somebody's daughter." Full Review

Oslo (Broadway)
Upper W Side
Reviewing The Drama

"The reviews regarding the efficacy of the Oslo Accords are mixed; the play's coda, though hopeful, admits as much. There is still work to be done. Which is what makes this both so intriguing and cringe-inducing...As far as the production is concerned, I appreciated that Rogers took care to let us get to know these characters, and he's aided by Bartlett Sher's direction...Sher incorporates a lot of movement, serving as momentum to keep the talks (and the play) going." Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

for a previous production "Delights in its frivolity...The point is to be entertained. And watching people mess up or walk into a door or get hit with some flying object is entertaining. I know that's not the most sympathetic take on humor, but slapstick has endured for a reason...'The Play that Goes Wrong' is laugh-out-loud funny...Aided, no doubt by Mark Bell's expert direction. (Comedy, especially farce, can go so wrong so quickly. It takes methodical plotting and precision. The company succeeds.)" Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

“The show starts off well, with Joan's transformation from poor farm girl into impassioned warrior a powerful moment (Jo Lampert is giving a strong performance and has a great voice); it then idles in the middle, and picks up a bit at the end. Overall, there's no urgency in the production or storytelling. Most disappointingly, though, especially considering Timbers's ingenuity, is that if felt like a safe, staid production…The direction came off as generic, even timid.” Full Review

Significant Other
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"It has lost nothing in its transfer to Broadway, and, in fact, gained the terrific Rebecca Naomi Jones as a cast member...Once again, I was utterly struck by Jordan's summation of what it all means: finding someone to go through it with...This is the tone playwright Harmon and gifted director, Trip Cullman, sustain throughout: bracing honesty with some lightheartedness and laughs, tracing the highs and lows of relationships...Off-Broadway and on, I was moved by the final tableau." Full Review

Man From Nebraska
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"Birney gives a layered exploration of the complexities of being a regular guy who's just not sure what happened to his life, how he got here...O'Toole gives a quiet, understated performance as the tossed-aside wife. Though not fully drawn on the page, O'Toole shows that Nancy is just as complicated as Ken...With no offense meant to Letts (or Birney), in this day and age, the more interesting story might be the one about the woman from Nebraska." Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"An original, emotional, affecting musical, free of stunt casting, is on Broadway...Levenson's book is both funny and touching; Pasek and Paul's score features accessible pop and smart, raw lyrics that reveal depth of character. It's going to be a great day because Rachel Bay Jones knocks you out with her portrayal of a frazzled, trying mother, and because Ben Platt gives a stunning, star-making performance as the exposed nerve that is our title character...Platt is the real thing." Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"I had a blast..Despite being on Broadway, there's a scrappy sensibility to the storytelling...It's different, because it takes risks, because it's audacious, it actually excites...I knew Groban would thrill me, but I was not ready for the luminous Denee Benton, who is also making her Broadway debut. She is fabulous, and has a beautiful voice... Natasha is naive but not a flake, and, like Pierre, searching for something true. I think we've found it in this adventurous new musical." Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"McTeer and Schreiber have such great chemistry...It's difficult to watch Valmont ravish Cecile (especially because this Cecile looks so young)...The direction, by Josie Rourke, doesn't help...Schreiber and Sorensen have no chemistry...Sure, McTeer and Schreiber are red hot lovers as the Marquise and Valmont, but everyone and everything else (save the always welcome Peil) pales in comparison. Danger, Will Robinson. Skip this liaison." Full Review

A Life
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"In 'A Life,' Pierce proves worthy of his Tony, fully inhabiting a real person. It's a touching and sensitive portrayal, one that instantly hooked me, and made me care deeply about Nate...Layers and insights are revealed in time (thanks to director Anne Kauffman and scenic designer Laura Jellinek), and I savored Bock's Annie Baker–like silences and extended moments of stillness, of seemingly nothing happening on stage." Full Review

Love, Love, Love
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"Bartlett is a great writer and a keen observer of relationships, and he proves as much with this decade-spanning serio-comedy that traces the relationship of Kenneth (Richard Armitage, appealing, commanding, charming) and Sandra (Amy Ryan, sharp, cunning, captivating) from the swinging '60s to present day, all under the direction of Tony winner Michael Mayer...Bartlett entreats the audience to think about love, love, love, in all its shapes and sizes, in all the directions it can take you." Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"It’s a simple plot, typical of musical comedies from the '40s, mostly meant to entertain and be the conveyance for songs and dances. Lots of songs and dances. And by this measure, the new old-fashioned musical is entirely pleasant. It’s fun and fluffy, and has a creamy, sorbet-colored palette that’s pleasing to the eyes. The book feels fresh and modern, though some of the modernisms come off as a little anachronistic. That’s no bother, though." Full Review

The Layover
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"Through noir tropes, and with the aid of Trip Cullman's incisive direction, Headland explores relationships and gender roles. She presents us with discussions of love and murder, leaving us to draw our own interpretations...Parisse is captivating…Rothenberg is entirely appealing as Dex…’The Layover’ is a wholly intriguing play, with plenty of Headland's dark humor providing color and commentary." Full Review

Privacy
East Village
Reviewing The Drama

“There's a lot of publicity surrounding the Public's production. Publicity is great, but the play's the thing and this play, written by Graham and directed by Rourke, is more like a theatricalized TED talk than a play. Plot or character motivation is used as a device to explore and demonstrate how little privacy we have...Kudos to the ensemble, who (except for Radcliffe) play dozens of characters.” Full Review

The Total Bent
East Village
Reviewing The Drama

"These themes resonate with me. The show, however, didn't quite work...The last 20 minutes of the show is mostly a concert. A ridiculously good concert, but a concert nonetheless…It's exhilarating to watch. But the father–son storyline is still largely unresolved…Had 'The Total Bent' been presented as a song-cycle in Joe's Pub, Stew's comments would have felt appropriate. In the context of a theatrical production, they seemed out of place and aggressive." Full Review

Indecent
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

for a previous production "'Indecent' is a well-crafted and interesting play (with music). Though the structure and the very conceit of digging into and reflecting on our own history did bring thoughts of other recent artistic endeavors, there are more than enough specifics—culturally, historically, and otherwise—to distinguish it from the pack. What resonates the most is Asch's original question to his peers, 'Why does every Jew on stage have to be a paragon?'" Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"Director Jonathan Kent has assembled an all star cast. It's great watching stage and screen veterans Byrne and Shannon go toe-to-toe...Tony winner Gallagher is terrific…But it's Jessica Lange who is, unsurprisingly, the stand out. Watch as she dances around the stage while Mary dances around the issue...Listen as her voice changes on a dime, betraying the confusion and fog that keeps Mary in her own world. She is mesmerizing." Full Review

American Psycho
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

“I walked out of ‘American Psycho’ the musical thinking that it was too sanitized...I find I'm ambivalent about this production. There are elements to praise, but it doesn't thrill like a thriller should...There are some choices and 80's nods in this production that baffle me or feel like pandering...The ending, like in the movie, is enigmatic...And that's part of my struggle with the show. There's a foreboding sense of doom in the air... but ‘American Psycho’ just doesn't feel dangerous.” Full Review

Head of Passes
East Village
Reviewing The Drama

"Truly, it's a riveting performance from Ms. Rashad...Rashad's performance is like nothing you've seen before. She grabs hold of the material—and you—and doesn't let go until she's had her say, the water has flooded in (literally; fantastic scenic design by G.W. Mercier), and she feels she has reached... I don't know. A resolution? A new day? Maybe just some sort of stasis? Whatever it is, it will blow you away." Full Review

Dry Powder
East Village
Reviewing The Drama

"Burgess is clever and throughout her smart, sharp play, it seems dry powder can refer to not just funds that are expendable, but people, too...Playwright Burgess skillfully draws all four characters fully, giving each of them a distinct dialect, if you will. None of them speak in exactly the same way, helping to distinguish their personalities. For all its merits, including Kail's use of Rachel Hauck's scenic design as a storytelling device, I found 'Dry Powder' to be just fine." Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"It's a lovely story, quaint, old-fashioned, and sincere, the kind of story we don't see these days, which makes this glorious revival such a welcomed treat...'She Loves Me' is traditional in its book musical structure, but a large, dance-happy ensemble is nowhere to be found. Instead, 'She Loves Me,' with its overture and entr'acte, gorgeous orchestrations, and sincerely hopeful tone is an intimate musical...It's a great production of a great show. I love it!" Full Review

Reviewing The Drama

"For this Alfred Uhry–Robert Waldman musical, Timbers returns to the scrappy, ensemble-reliant style he so expertly used with 'Peter and the Starcatcher' and 'Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson.' In doing so, he gets to the core of what theatre is about—a group of people working in concert to tell a story. It's full of glee and giddiness, and you'll have a blast for the too-brief 90 minutes you're in Timbers's care...Make your way to this delightful romp of a musical while you can." Full Review

Dot
Gramercy
Reviewing The Drama

"Domingo has written an unsparingly honest play, one that sees family members talking to one another like only family members can. Directed by Susan Stroman, the pacing is terrific, and I could appreciate the way the conversations overlapped. 'Dot' is equal parts hilarious and devastating...'Dot' gave me that jolt of ferocity and authenticity I want in theatre; something meaty, with great writing and terrific performances. It's the first must-see new play of 2016." Full Review

Prodigal Son
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"By the end of the day, it's just another coming of age story, another tale of a young, white Christian boy becoming a young, white Christian man. (Can I get some Neil Simon or some women or some non-Caucasians up in here?) It was entertaining enough, but nothing special. " Full Review

Noises Off
Midtown W
Reviewing The Drama

"A cast that is simply an embarrassment of riches…This is just fabulous. Particularly with a farce, it's all in the timing, and director Herrin gets it just right…Doors slam at just the right moment; a treacherous phone cords wraps so diabolically around a characters; an axe is caught, one-handed, in the nick of time. And this cast…The standout is the luminescent Megan Hilty…We knew she was good, but with this role, Hilty raises the bar for comedic acting." Full Review