Rollo Romig

Rollo Romig is a critic with New Yorker. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (8)
New Yorker

“Directed with a gently surreal touch by Rebeck, the actors impersonating the celebrities are delightful: Sale’s Wilson is paunchy and aloof, and Wohl’s Morris is an offhand megalomaniac. But it’s the crew members whose perspectives make the premise of this show so weirdly engrossing. Ackerman is interested in big ideas which is one of the best jokes here: to load such heavy stuff onto such an absurd frame.” Full Review

New Yorker

for a previous production “The performance space...is a cozy attic...an aptly intimate setting...for this one-person show about a Presbyterian widow...Directed by Amy Jones...Elise Forier Edie’s script scans a bit more like a first-person short story than like a monologue to be performed. But Ripley fully inhabits the role, employing a profound command of inflection and mannerism that makes her character engrossingly genuine and conversational; she finds humor in the most unexpected little places." Full Review

Imagining Madoff
Midtown W
New Yorker

for a previous production "So engrossing and philosophically lively...The cast of this belated New York City première, directed by Jerry Heymann, is exquisite: as Madoff, Jeremiah Kissel prowls the stage like some eloquent but enigmatic animal; as Galkin, Gerry Bamman pinpoints the tragic intersection of wisdom and obliviousness. And Jenny Allen adds a rich third dimension as Madoff’s secretary, who struggles to presume her own innocence in her testimony at his trial." Full Review

New Yorker

“Stage adaptation by Charlotte Moore, who also directs...This is a full-on Christmas musical, including a set that looks like the inside of a snow globe and the unapologetic performance of nearly two dozen Yuletide carols. If these conditions are acceptable to you, the experience will be cozy and sweet and funny and warm, with subtle undertones of melancholy and loss." Full Review

Original Sound
West Village
New Yorker

"The exploitation theme is a lot more compelling than the selfishness theme, which plays out too familiarly in situations with Danny’s sister and with his roommate. But the best scene is about neither: at the center of the play is a gorgeous extended musical sequence between Danny and Ryan that captures the magic moment when a collaboration clicks." Full Review

New Yorker

“Produced for the Pan Asian Repertory Theatre, Gomolvilas’s clever, multilayered play is gratifyingly subtle in its inquiry into migration—the pain of crossing over for the living and the dead alike. Liu’s direction shifts deftly among registers: comedy, melancholy, suspense, and several genuine scares, achieved with the help of some smart lo-fi effects but especially through the performances. Hirano plays an alarmingly agile ghost.” Full Review

Spaceman
East Village
New Yorker

“Intense and frightening play by Stevens, directed by Titus...Molly pinballs from professional to goofy to agitated, and interlocutors and insentient companions only underline her solitude: there’s mission control, whose messages arrive after a frustrating delay; the various TV shows that are helping to bankroll the mission, which send a maddening barrage of questions...The sound design, lights, and even the lack of gravity come to feel like characters.” Full Review

New Yorker

"The Ensemble for the Romantic Century has made the inspired choice of pairing a staging of Dickinson’s poems and letters, read by Angelica Page, with a chamber-music performance...Directed by Donald T. Sanders, the production includes some unnecessary elements that often undermine the urgency of the music and the verse...But Page is a superb interpreter of Dickinson, lending a fresh depth and spirit to even the most familiar poems." Full Review