Steve Capra

Steve Capra is a critic with New York Critic Blog. This account has been auto-generated, and does not indicate that this person is an active member of Show-Score.com. That said, if you "follow" this member, you will automatically be updated whenever s/he writes a new review.

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Reviews (19)
Bleach
Brooklyn
New York Critic Blog

“The script at first seems predictable...but it turns into something more interesting and creative than we expect...Carey’s direction is delicate, meticulous, never heavy-handed or obvious...Yates is never false...However, he does not have emotional range or depth...Be that as it may. ‘Bleach’ is first-rate cutting edge theater. I’ve never felt closer to a character than this hyper-intimate evening. Well done!” Full Review

The Blue Room
West Village
New York Critic Blog

"It’s a very good play in concept, characters and dialogue. Schnitzler’s play has been updated, but without conceptual change...Max Hunter directs himself and Christina Toth, and they work well together...The show is sexy without ever being vulgar...The cast is not without faults...But they eschew affectation or heavy-handed characterization." Full Review

New York Critic Blog

"We feel superior to a bug-eyed puppet, but through great puppetry we accept Randy as a character...Through a varied vocal life, McIvor creates a complex personality, frustrated, angry, sly. He insults his audience without being offensive, and he’s common without being cheap...This is really smart stand-up...The script needs to stay closer to its premise, and some of the vulgarity goes too far. But 'Randy Writes a Novel' is really funny, an Aussie import much appreciated." Full Review

Or Current Resident
East Village
New York Critic Blog

"It’s refreshing to find a conventional, naturalistic production of a new script...What’s most striking about the script is Ms. Bigwood’s naturalistic dialogue. She’s very skilled at delayed exposition...What’s more, the playwright imbeds the most significant lines in the conversation with marvelous subtlety...Varnell’s direction is smooth and subtle, seemingly effortless...Some of the actors rush their lines...They’ve neglected to balance the needs of naturalism with the needs of the listener." Full Review

New York Critic Blog

“Carriere and Raver are absolutely terrific…Their readings of the poems are marvelous…As Death, Sarah Naughton is as skillful as the two men on stage, but she has less interesting material to work with…Mr. Dobbins has directed this highly formal piece very well, delicately, expressively but without showiness...Mr. Pearce doesn’t really give enough shape to the raw material he’s chosen. It’s the Sassoon and Owen poems themselves that keep us engaged.” Full Review

Rare Birds
East Village
New York Critic Blog

"The script is well crafted, never flagging, with carefully wrought dialogue...Scott Ebersold has directed masterfully. He keeps the stage fluid and dynamic, and he allows his actors to shine. The entire cast performs well, although the two bullies aren’t given much to do except to be mean...And so 'Rare Birds' is a well-executed production of a script that lacks cultural truth. In this topsy-turvy dramatic world, the gays bully the straights. Mr. Szymkowicz needs to rethink his concept." Full Review

Chess Match No. 5
Midtown W
New York Critic Blog

"The play isn’t a drama at all. It’s a Socratic dialogue, a lesson on the nature of music...Interesting as these ideas are, the dialogue alone wouldn’t absorb us in the play. What’s more, there’s no plot or specific characterization. What involves us is the astonishing moment-to-moment life of the two actors, Will Bond and Ellen Lauren...Ms. Bogart’s direction is impeccable...'Chess Match No. 5' is a terrific explication of musical and philosophical ideas, a marvelous tribute to Mr. Cage." Full Review

New York Critic Blog

"Mr. McLean is a very fine actor. His work is precise and meticulous. He gives us all the variety he can find in his stage life...'The Most Reluctant Convert' is an inspired script, and the intellectual workout is masterfully executed. But although the show engages us intellectually, it fails to capture our emotions. Mr. McLean is adept at indicating a new thought, but he too seldom indicates a new emotion." Full Review

New York Critic Blog

"This intellectual source material could make for a ponderous stage production, but the show is terrific–animated and engaging. In place of dramatic tension it serves up a thick irony...McLean gives a brilliant performance as 'His Abysmal Sublimity' Screwtape. In lesser hands the role would be deadly, but Mr. McLean, who also directs the show, keeps us absorbed throughout...'The Screwtape Letters' is quite an accomplishment, intellectually and emotionally absorbing." Full Review

New York Critic Blog

"There’s a bit of a story here, a type of structure, but it’s sketchy. The activity of the auction doesn’t substitute for a framing device. And the period before the auction itself begins, interesting as it is for a while, lasts too long without the show’s central business to engross us. In all, Going Once! Laughing Twice!!, is fun, creative and flawed." Full Review

New York Critic Blog

"It's really good, a lively and entertaining stage response to Ms. Shelley...Hromsco has directed the show with a great, refined sense of fun...The scene in which the Creature comes to life is played to great effect...Just as we want - but we never feel like we've seen it before, and it's never heavy-handed...The cast does a good job...The script is smart...The music is suitably varied, with some handy duets, if not particularly memorable. It relishes melodrama." Full Review

A Blanket of Dust
Soho/Tribeca
New York Critic Blog

“Squires keeps his script lean...The characters have no identity aside from their attitudes toward the issue, aside from the sketchy romance. There’s no particularization...Unfortunately, this style makes the play less a drama than a mere argument...The director, Christopher Murrah, has picked up on the polemic and directed his actors to YELL in nearly every scene...We soon grow tired of this - worse, annoyed.” Full Review

Shooter
Midtown W
New York Critic Blog

"Skillfully written...Ean Sheehy gives a terrific performance as Jim, exposing the character’s journey with focus and clarity...However, both the playwright and the director overdo the intensity...Ms. Hilbe keeps her actors at the peak of intensity throughout the play...It’s great to find Mr. Graber examining the same subject in 'Shooter' for the contemporary audience, and in such an adroit production." Full Review

New York Critic Blog

"Trivializing God is a staple of bad plays...In this play God is weak, easily manipulated, and not even funny...And we don’t care what’s happening in this play because the script doesn’t make us care. The writing is sketchy; it glosses over dramatic action. There’s no dramatic tension...Padden does the best he can considering the material. He keeps everything moving along at a nice clip...He’s staged in the round; it makes for a nice intimacy, but doesn’t salvage the play." Full Review

New York Critic Blog

"Fusion Theatre’s mission is to merge classical theatre with opera...The technique works very well...O’Dea gives a superb performance as Antigone...Groen, as well, gives a marvelous, complex performance as Creon. In fact, the entire cast is first-rate. O’Dea directs the show, and she keeps it sharp and focused throughout...The staging strips drama to bare truth. She eschews theatricality and gives us a direct honesty...This production is excellent, exquisite, a great success." Full Review

Vanity Fair
Midtown W
New York Critic Blog

"It’s a terrific production, altogether satisfying...Eric Tucker directs with enormous precision and humor. The stage is constantly animated. The pace never flags and we never weary of these 19th-century characters who behave so badly and are so like us...There are moments when the playwright throws rather too much at us at once, and we’re confused. But The Pearl Theatre Company has mounted a great success." Full Review

New York Critic Blog

"The acting is quite good. Parsons has directed the show well, with a clear distinction between its thoughtful passages and its humorous ones...And so 'The Last Days of Judas' Iscariot presents us with a promising concept that’s not mined for its potential. Most of its characters are no more than cartoons. Its various ideas aren’t embedded into its concept and, with its obscenity and its insult to seniors, it’s offensive." Full Review

New York Critic Blog

"The concept is enormously creative, a hyper-intellectual fantasy in the genre of Shaw’s 'Don Juan in Hell.' And it’s very well executed. It’s directed by Michael Parva, who keeps an eloquent tone to the whole thing, a sort of realism within a surreal moment...McTaggart’s performance as Martin Luther is terrific, with a strong and precise internal life...The ideological point of the whole thing is obscured by some overwriting...But 'Martin Luther on Trial' is a unique accomplishment." Full Review

New York Critic Blog

"An ambitious, elaborate production...The company has pulled together too many disparate elements. The robotic puppet has nothing in common visually with the actor or with the shadow puppet representing the man. It’s the focus of 'The Digger,' but whatever statement its robotness is making is lost among the ideas and techniques in this post-modernist pastiche." Full Review